Genesis 47

Written and compiled by Gary Kukis

Genesis 47:1–31

Pharaoh Welcomes Joseph’s Family/The Famine Continues


These studies are designed for believers in Jesus Christ only. If you have exercised faith in Christ, then you are in the right place. If you have not, then you need to heed the words of our Lord, Who said, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son, so that every [one] believing [or, trusting] in Him shall not perish, but shall be have eternal life! For God did not send His Son into the world so that He should judge the world, but so that the world shall be saved through Him. The one believing [or, trusting] in Him is not judged, but the one not believing has already been judged, because he has not believed in the Name of the only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son of God.” (John 3:16–18). “I am the Way and the Truth and the Life! No one comes to the Father except through [or, by means of] Me!” (John 14:6).


Every study of the Word of God ought to be preceded by a naming of your sins to God. This restores you to fellowship with God (1John 1:8–10). If there are people around, you would name these sins silently. If there is no one around, then it does not matter if you name them silently or whether you speak aloud.


Document Navigation

Preface

Quotations

Outline of Chapter

Charts, Graphics, Short Doctrines

Doctrines Alluded to

Chapters Alluded to

Dictionary of Terms

Introduction and Text

First Verse

Addendum

A Complete Translation

Chapter Word Clouds


Links to the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies of Genesis (HTML) (PDF) (that is what this document is). This incorporates 2 previous studies done in the book of Genesis. However, much of this material was thrown together without careful editing. Therefore, from time to time, there will be concepts and exegetical material which will be repeated, because there was no overall editing done once all of this material was combined.

 

There is a second, less complete set of weekly lessons of Genesis (HTML) (PDF). Every word of that study can be found in the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies.

 

This study makes reference to a wide-range of sources. There are quotations from doctrinal teachers, of course; but from Catholic commentaries and from other sources as well. Wherever I found relevant truth, I quoted from it or was inspired by it. Even though it is clear that some churches have a better concept of our reason for being here, that does not mean that there is no truth to be found anywhere else. So, from time to time, I will quote from John Calvin, even though I do not subscribe to 5-point Calvinism; I will quote from some Catholic sources, even though I believe that they are very wrong regarding Mary, the pope, apostolic succession and other such doctrines. The intention is for this to be the most thorough and accurate study of Genesis available anywhere.

 

Also, it is not necessary that you read the grey Hebrew exegesis tables. They are set apart from the rest of the study so that you can easily skip over them (based upon the suggestion of a friend). However, if you ever doubt the translation of a word, phrase or a verse, these translation tables are then available.


Preface: Joseph brings his family into Egypt permanently in Gen. 47, introducing them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh assigns to his family the land of Goshen, which is apparently not too far from the palace of Pharaoh.


The famine continues in the land, and Joseph continues to sell the available grain, eventually taking the people of Egypt and their lands for Pharaoh. The priests of the land were not subject to these payments. Joseph institutes what is essentially an income tax in perpetuity.


Jacob, near the end of his life, makes Joseph swear to bury him in Canaan. This final section might have been better placed with Gen. 48.


There are many chapter commentaries on the book of Genesis. This will be the most extensive examination of Genesis 47, where you will be able to examine in depth every word of the original text. Every attempt has been made to make this both a complete and self-contained study. Therefore, all references, vocabulary, and related concepts should be found within this extensive study. Easy access links to more in-depth studies of some vocabulary words, concepts and doctrines are also provided.


Quotations:


Outline of Chapter 47:

 

Preface

Introduction

 

         vv.     1–12         Pharaoh Meets’ Joseph’s Brothers and Father and Gives Them Egyptian Land

         vv.    13–26         The Famine Continues

         vv.    27–31         Jacob Requires that Joseph Bury Him in the Land of Canaan

 

Summary

Addendum


Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines:

 

         Preface               Quotations

 

         Introduction 

         Introduction         The Prequel of Genesis 47

         Introduction         The Principals of Genesis 47

         Introduction         The Places of Genesis 47

         Introduction         The Patriarchal Timeline for Genesis 47

         Introduction         A Synopsis of Genesis 47

         Introduction         Paragraph Divisions of Modern Translations for Genesis 47 (from Dr. Bob Utley)

         Introduction 

         Introduction 

 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.       6              Goshen and the Hebrews

         v.       6              Map of Goshen in Egypt

         v.       6              Map of Avaris

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      12              A New Theory of the Authorship of Genesis

         v.      12              Evidence that the history of Genesis was known to the Hebrew people early on

         v.      13              Hajime Murai’s Structure of Genesis 47:13-26

         v.      14              What We Learn from Joseph Selling the Grain

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      21              Two Interpretations of Genesis 47:21

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      26              Why are churches untaxed?

         v.      26              Parallels Between What Joseph Did and What Jesus Christ Does For Us

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      28              William Ramey’s Chiasmos of Genesis 47:28–48:22

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      31              The Many Pairings of the Patriarchal Age (by Wenstrom)

 

         Summary            A Set of Summary Doctrines and Commentary

         Summary            Why Genesis 47 is in the Word of God

         Summary            What We Learn from Genesis 47

         Summary            B. H. Carroll Summarizes Genesis 47

         Summary            Edersheim Summarizes Genesis 47

         Summary 

 

         Addendum 

         Addendum          Josephus’ History of this Time Period

         Addendum          A Complete Translation of Genesis 47

         Addendum          Word Cloud from a Reasonably Literal Paraphrase of Genesis 47

         Addendum          Word Cloud from the Exegesis of Genesis 47


Chapter Outline

 

Charts, Graphics, Short Doctrines

Beginning of Document

Doctrines Covered or Alluded to

Chapters of the Bible Alluded to

Definition of Terms

Introduction and Text

Addendum

www.kukis.org

 

Exegetical Studies in Genesis


Doctrines Covered or Alluded To

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional doctrines and links are found in Definition of Terms below.


Chapters of the Bible Alluded To and/or Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

 

 

 

 


Many who read and study this chapter are 1st or 2nd generation students of R. B. Thieme, Jr., so that much of this vocabulary is second nature. One of Bob’s contributions to theology is a fresh vocabulary along with a number of concepts which are theologically new or reworked, yet still orthodox. Therefore, if you are unfamiliar with his work, the definitions below will help you to fully understand all that is being said. Also, I have developed a few new terms and concepts which require definition as well.

In addition, there are other more traditional yet technical theological terms which will be used and therefore defined as well.

Sometimes the terms in the exegesis of this chapter are simply alluded to, without any in-depth explanation of them. Sometimes, these terms are explained in detail and illustrated. A collection of all these terms is found here: (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Definition of Terms

Rebound (Restoration to fellowship with God)

In the New Testament, this is naming your sins to God, so that you are both restored to temporal fellowship with God and are then filled with the Spirit of God. In the Old Testament, naming your sins to God would result in a restoration of fellowship and, in some cases, the empowerment of the Holy Spirit once again (the Holy Spirit was not given to all Old Testament believers). See the Doctrine of Rebound (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Some of these definitions are taken from

http://gracebiblechurchwichita.org/

http://rickhughesministries.org/content/Biblical-Terms.pdf

http://www.gbible.org/index.php?proc=d4d

http://www.wordoftruthministries.org/terms-and-definitions/

http://www.theopedia.com/

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————


An Introduction to Genesis 47


I ntroduction: Gen. 47 divides up easily into 3 sections (and it quite amazes me that very few translations offer headings for each section): (1) Joseph brings in 5 of his brothers and then his father to meet and to speak with Pharaoh, and to get official permission to live in the land of Egypt; (2) the remainder of the famine is discussed, and we find out how Joseph dealt with it; and (3) Jacob recognizes that he is near the end of his life, and he tells this to his son Joseph and extracts from him a promise to bury him in the land of Canaan.


As you can see, these sections are quite disparate and not really related, apart from Joseph being at the heart of each vignette. It would have made a great deal of sense for the final section to have been placed with Gen. 48, which deals with Jacob’s adoption and blessing of his two grandsons.


As we have noticed throughout these final chapters of Genesis, the chapter divisions often seem unnecessary or incorrectly placed. In the previous chapter, all of Joseph’s relatives have moved to Egypt, and that last thing that happened was, Joseph told his brothers to be honest about their profession of keeping animals. We begin this new chapter by those brothers standing before Pharaoh and telling him about their profession. It would have made sense for Gen. 46:31–34 (where Joseph tells his brothers what to say to Pharaoh) to be in the same chapter as Gen. 47:1–11 (where Pharaoh meets and interviews the brothers of Jacob, hearing about their profession, and assigning them specific land in Egypt where they might live).


Gen. 47:11 (or 12) is the conclusion of the wonderful narrative which begins with Joseph as a young man, age 17, being sold by his brothers into slavery in Egypt; to this point where the family of Joseph (his father and brothers) have arrived in Egypt to live, and have met with Pharaoh. This continuous narrative began in Gen. 37:1 and takes us to Gen. 47:11 (or 12) (there was an intermission in Gen. 38).


At various times, this narrative is probably delivered by two men, Joseph and Judah, each one taking turns, speaking before their families (which would make perfect sense, as these men together assume the rights and privileges of the firstborn). It is possible that Leah originally spoke a portion of this narrative as well, telling about the birth of her sons and her sister’s sons.


It is my educated guess that their father Jacob spoke Gen. 1–36 from memory, at various times, while in Egypt. Reading the Torah aloud seems to be very much in line with current Jewish traditions and Jewish traditions from the time of Jesus Christ. The only difference is, Jacob and his sons would have done this from memory.


Coming to the end of this continual narrative does not mean that we leave Joseph and his family. However, the narratives from Gen. 47:13 and forward tend to be more episodic (as were the chapters on Abraham). Same people, same family, same location (for the most part); but a clear diverging from the continuous narrative which we have enjoyed up to this time.


In Gen. 47, Joseph stands before Pharaoh to introduce to him his father and some of his brothers.


Gen. 47 is a chapter which speaks of great changes in the land of Egypt. Joseph never allowed the country to become socialistic or communistic. Every year that grain was needed, those who needed it had to pay some sort of a price. It was not distributed freely, except to the priests. Furthermore, those who paid everything that they had for this grain were grateful. They did not have their hands out and then complain when not enough was given to them; they were grateful that Joseph kept them and their families alive.


Also in this chapter we will see Joseph settle his family in the land of Goshen with Pharaoh's permission and Jacob will enter into the dying phase of his life. Because of his words and actions, I have often had to draw conclusions as to his spiritual state. I am certain there are some people who questioned this. In this chapter, we can tell by his period of dying that his life was a spiritual mess.


It is important to understand what has gone before.

The Prequel of Genesis 47

 

Gen. 47 will begin with

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


We need to know who the people are who populate this chapter.

The Principals of Genesis 47

Characters

Commentary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


We need to know where this chapter takes place.

The Places of Genesis 47

Place

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Patriarchal Timeline for Genesis 47


Legend

Birth or death

God speaks with Abraham

Historical incidents (most of which are related to Abraham)

Parenthetical dates (2065 b.c.) simply refer to taking the date assigned by the chronologist and using Scripture to determine the next date.

The entire Abrahamic Timeline (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

The entire Patriarchal Timeline (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

With Abraham, there are continual references to his age, which helps to determine relative dates. There are far fewer references to the ages of Isaac, Jacob and Joseph, which means that there is more guesswork involved in determining dates during their lifetimes.


MacDonald

(N. Berkeley Bible)

Reese’s Chronology Bible

Bible Hub

Ages

Scripture

Event/Description

2234 b.c.

2097 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:24

Terah, Abram’s father, is born. Gen 11:24–26 Nahor lived 29 years and fathered Terah. After he fathered Terah, Nahor lived 119 years and fathered other sons and daughters. Terah lived 70 years and fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

 

1978 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:25

Death of Nahor, Abram’s uncle

 

1969 b.c.

 

Noah is 950

Gen. 9:28–29

Death of Noah

2164 b.c.

1967 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:26–27

Abraham (Terah’s son) and Lot (Haran’s son) born in Ur of the Chaldeans. Abram would be the 43rd generation from Adam. Gen 11:26 Terah lived 70 years and fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

2078 b.c.

1881 b.c.

2080 b.c.

Abraham is 86

Gen. 16:15–16

Ishmael born to Abraham and Hagar in the land of Canaan. Gen 16:16 Abram was 86 years old when Hagar bore Ishmael to him.

2064 b.c. (2066 b.c.)

 

2066 b.c.

Abraham is 100

Gen. 21:1–7 1Chron. 1:34

Isaac born to Abraham. Isaac would be the 44th generation from Adam. Gen 21:5 Abraham was 100 years old when his son Isaac was born to him.

 

1841–

1816 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:12–16 1Chron. 1:29–31

Ishmael’s children.

 

1834 b.c.

1829 b.c. (Klassen)

2054 b.c.

 

Gen. 22:1–19

Abraham is told by God to go to the land of Moriah to offer up his son Isaac to God as a sacrifice. This was a 3-day journey away. They then go to Beer-sheba, which could simply indicate that they are returning home to Beer-sheba.

Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge puts this date at 1872 b.c., based upon Antiquities by Josephus.

(2029 b.c.)

1830 b.c.

2030 b.c.

Abraham is 137

Gen. 23:1–20

The death of Sarah. She dies in Kirjatharba, it is Hebron, in the land of Canaan. Gen 23:1 Now Sarah lived 127 years; these were all the years of her life. She is buried in a cave of the field of Machpelah before Mamre; it is Hebron, in the land of Canaan, purchased by Abraham from the sons of Heth.

(2026 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 24:1–67 Gen. 25:20

Isaac (Abraham’s son) and Rebecca. Gen. 25:20 Isaac was 40 years old when he took as his wife Rebekah daughter of Bethuel the Aramæan from Paddan-aram, and sister of Laban the Aramæan. At this time, Isaac is living in the Negev. It is likely that Abraham lived there as well; or near to there.

 

 

2026 b.c.

Isaac is 40

Gen. 25:20

Isaac marries Rebecca. Gen. 25:20

 

1826 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:1

Abraham marries Keturah. Smith puts the date at 1860 b.c.; and Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge at 1853 b.c.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 25:2–4 1Chron. 1:32–33

Abraham’s fathers children by Keturah.

 

1817 b.c.

 

Shem is 600

Gen. 11:11

Death of Shem.

2004 b.c.

1807 b.c.

2006 b.c.

Abraham is 160; Isaac is 60

Gen. 25:19, 21–26

Jacob & Esau born to Isaac. Gen 25:26 After this, his brother came out grasping Esau's heel with his hand. So he was named Jacob. Isaac was 60 years old when they were born. Therefore, Abraham would be 160 years old.

(1991 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 25:5–6

Isaac is the heir of all things that Abraham has (but, most importantly, of the covenant of God with Abraham).

1989 b.c.

1792 b.c.

1991 b.c.

Abraham is 175

Gen. 25:7–10

Abraham dies. Gen 25:7 This is the length of Abraham's life: 175 years. He is buried in the cave of Machpelah near Mamre, in the field of Nephron (this would be with Sarah).

 

 

 

 

Gen. 25:11

God blesses Isaac.

(1943 b.c.)

1788 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:17

The death of Ishmael. Gen 25:17 This is the length of Ishmael's life: 137 years. He took his last breath and died, and was gathered to his people.

 

 

 

Eber is 464

Gen. 11:17

Death of Eber.

 

1782 b.c.

1978 b.c.

 

Gen. 25:27–34

Jacob obtains Esau’s birthright for a mess of pottage.

 

1782 b.c.

1740 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:1–5

A famine in the land; God renews covenant with Isaac at Gerar.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 26:6–10

Rebecca and Isaac in Gerar.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 26:11–16

Isaac is blessed by God in Gerar.

 

1782 b.c.

1735 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:17–22

Strife between Isaac and Philistines in and near Gerar.

 

1767 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 26:34–35

Esau marries two Canaanite women.

 

1757–

1739 b.c.

1733 b.c.

(Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:23–25

Isaac makes an altar in Beer-sheba.

(1943 b.c.)

1744 b.c.

 

Ishmael is 137

Gen. 25:17–18

The death of Ishmael.

 

1738 b.c.

c 1732 b.c.

(Klassen)

1977 b.c.

 

Gen. 26:26–33

Isaac’s alliance with Abimelech at Beersheba.

(1929 b.c.)

1737 b.c.

1730 b.c. (Klassen)

1929 b.c.

 

Gen. 27:1–46

Jacob by deception receives a final blessing from Isaac that was meant for Esau.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 28:1–5

Jacob goes to his Uncle Laban’s home in Padan-aram for a wife.

 

 

1928 b.c.

 

Gen. 28:10–22

Jacob’s dream; God speaks to Jacob.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 28:6–9

Esau marries a daughter of Ishmael.

 

 

1906 b.c. (For descendants)

 

Gen. 36:1–42

Esau’s marriages and descendants.

 

1736 b.c.

1730 b.c. (Klassen)

1928 b.c.

 

Gen. 29:1–14

Jacob in Haran (Charan).

 

1736–

1729 b.c.

1730–

1723 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 29:15–20

Jacob works 7 years to marry Rachel, but is deceived by Laban, and Jacob marries Leah, her older sister.

 

1729 b.c.

1724 b.c. (Klassen)

1921 b.c.

 

Gen. 29:21–31

Jacob marries Rachel

(1915 b.c.)

1729–

1716 b.c.

1723–

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1921 b.c.

1916 b.c. (Rachel bears Joseph)

 

Gen. 29:32–34

Gen. 30:1–6

Gen. 29:35

Gen. 30:9, 7–8, 10–24

Jacob has 12 children by his wives, Rachel and Leah; and by their personal servants as well. Reese breaks the timeline down in smaller increments in his book.

1915 b.c.

 

 

 

Gen. 

Joseph is born.

 

1711 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 36:31–33

1Chron. 1:43–44

Gen. 26:34–39

1Chron. 1:45–50

Gen. 36:40–43

1Chron. 1:51–54

The kings of Edom.

(1909 b.c.)

1716 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 30:25–43

Gen. 31:1–16

Jacob’s final years with Laban.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 31:17–55

Jacob’s departure from Laban.

 

 

1908 b.c.

 

Gen. 32:1–23

Jacob returns to Canaan.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 32:24–32

Gen. 35:10

Jacob wrestles with the angel.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 33:1–16

Jacob meets Esau face to face.

 

1715 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 33:17–20

The resumption of Jacob’s journey.

 

1711–

1708 b.c.

1706–

1705 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 38:1–5

1Chron. 2:3

Judah fathers 3 sons.

 

1700 b.c.

1687 b.c. (Klassen)

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 34:1–31

Dinah, daughter of Judah, is defiled.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 35:1–15

Jacob returns to Bethel.

 

1700 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1903 b.c.

 

Gen. 35:16–19 48:7 35:20–22

Rachel dies when giving birth to Benjamin.

(1898 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 35:27 37:1

The return to Hebron.

 

1699 b.c.

 

Joseph is 17

Gen. 37:2–11

Joseph—his early days and his dreams.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 37:12–35

Joseph in Shechem and Dothan.

1897 b.c.

 

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 37:36 39:1

Joseph is sold into slavery, to end up in Egypt.

 

c1699–

1690 b.c.

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:2–6

Joseph enjoys prosperity in Egypt.

 

c1695 b.c.

1707 b.c. (Klassen)

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 38:6–11

Judah and Tamar.

 

1692 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 38:12–26

Judah’s wife dies.

 

1692 b.c.

1691 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 38:27–30

1Chron. 2:4

The birth of Pharez, the 41st generation from Adam.

 

c1690 b.c.

1689 b.c. (Klassen)

1889 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:7–19

Joseph flees adultery.

 

 

1889 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:20–23

Joseph is put into jail; yet prospers in jail.

(1887 b.c.)

1688 b.c.

1887 b.c.

 

Gen. 40:1–23

Joseph gives the interpretation of the dreams of the baker and the butler.

1884 b.c.

1687 b.c.

 

Isaac is 180

Gen. 35:28–29

The death of Isaac. Now the days of Isaac were 180 years. (Gen. 35:28)

(1885 b.c.)

1686 b.c.

1886 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:1–37

Joseph interprets the Pharaoh’s dream.

 

 

1886 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:38–44

Joseph is made governor.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 41:45

Joseph marries Asenath.

1884 b.c.

1686–

1679 b.c.

1886 b.c. (Beginning)

 

Gen. 41:46–49

The 7 years of plenty.

 

1685–

1683 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 41:50–53

Sons are born to Joseph.

 

1685–

1681 b.c.

 

 

Ex. 6:16 Num. 3:17 1Chron. 6:1, 16

The descendants of Levi are born.

 

1679–

1672 b.c.

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:54–57

The seven years of famine.

(1876 b.c.)

1678 b.c.

1677 b.c. (Klassen)

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 42:1–44:34

Joseph provides his family with food.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 45:1–15

Joseph reveals himself to his brothers.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 45:16–28

Jacob hears that his son, Joseph, is still alive, and he prepares to travel to Egypt himself.

 

1677 b.c.

 

 

Ruth 4:18 1Chron. 2:5

Birth of Hezron, the 40th generation.

1873 b.c.

1677 b.c.

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 46:1–7, 28

Jacob goes to Egypt after God’s assurance in Beersheba.

 

 

1875 b.c.

Jacob is 130

Gen. 46:8–27 Ex. 1:1–5

Summary of the 70 who came to Egypt. Compare Gen. 47:8–9 and 46:27 for Jacob’s age.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 46:29–34 47:1–12

The people of Joseph are established in Egypt.

 

1676–

1675 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 47:13–21

Joseph continues as prime minister in Egypt, exercising wise leadership during the famine.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:22–26

The land of the priests in Egypt.

 

1672–

1593 b.c.

 

 

1Chron. 2:6–8

Zerah, the brother of Pharez, and his descendants.

 

1671 b.c.

1660 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 48:1–22

Blessings to Manasseh and Ephraim.

 

1660 b.c.

1665 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

Birth of Berith to Ephraim.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:28–31

The last days of Jacob; his charge to Joseph.

 

 

1859 b.c.

 

Gen. 49:1–32

Jacob speaks to his sons, giving them their final blessings and encouraging them.

1857 b.c.

1660 b.c.

1859 b.c.

Jacob is 147

Gen. 49:33

The death of Jacob.

 

 

1859 b.c.

 

Gen. 50:1–14

The burial of Jacob.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 50:15–21

The fears of Joseph’s brothers after the death of Jacob.

 

1638 b.c.

1644 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

Birth of Resheph (who is in the line between Ephraim and Joshua).

 

1625 b.c.

1620 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Num. 26:58

Birth of Aram (Levi’s grandson and Moses’ father.

 

1623 b.c.

1604 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

The birth of Ram, the 39th generation.

 

1615 b.c.

1625 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

The birth of Telah, in the line between Ephraim and Joshua.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 50:22–23

Joseph’s last days.

 

1606 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 50:24–25

Joseph’s last words.

1805 b.c. (1805 b.c.)

 

1806 b.c.

Joseph is 110

Gen. 50:26 Ex. 1:6

The death of Joseph. His brothers also die.

 

1606–

1462 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 47:27 Ex. 1:7

The population explosion among the Jews living in Egypt.


Bibliography

MacDonald’s timeline is from: http://www.bibleistrue.com/qna/qna63.htm accessed October 11, 2011 and August 12, 2014. Included in MacDonald’s timeline is a timeline for Egypt interspersed.

See http://www.bibleistrue.com/qna/qna63dating.htm for his justification of his timeline.


The Bible Hub timeline (accessed January 11, 2015) appears to be pretty thorough, but no one specifically is credited.

From: http://www.christianshepherd.org/bible_study_guides/abram_to_the_exodus.pdf (Christian shepherd). This source believes that the Jews live only a short time in Egypt (210 years).

The Reese Chronological Bible; KJV translation; Editor: Edward Reese; ©1977 by Edward Reese and Klassen’s dating system ©1975 by Frank R. Klassen; Ⓟ1980 by Bethany House Publishers, South Minneapolis, MN; pp. 18–19, 54–74.


The Modern Language Bible (The New Berkeley Version), Revised Edition; ©1969 by Hendrickson Publishers, Inc.; pp. 10–54.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Here is what to expect from Genesis 47:

A Synopsis of Genesis 47

 

 

 

 

Like all chapters of the Word of God, you need more than just the simple plot outline to understand what God wants us to know.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The first title is often applicable to the entire chapter (although it may pertain just to the verses which follow it to the next section heading). You will note that 3 translations divided this chapter in exactly the same 3 places.

Paragraph Divisions of Modern Translations for Genesis 47 (from Dr. Bob Utley)

NASB

NKJV

NRSV

TEV

NJB (FOLLOWS MT)

Jacob's Family Settles in Goshen

Jacob Settles in Goshen
(46:38-47:12)

Jacob and His Sons Settle in Egypt
(Gen. 46:28 to Gen. 47:12)

Jacob and His Family in Egypt
(Gen. 46:28 to Gen. 47:12)

Pharaoh Grants an Audience

Gen. 47:1-6

Gen. 47:1-6

Gen. 47:1-6

Gen. 47:1-3 a

Gen. 47:1-5 a-6b

 

 

 

Gen. 47:3-6

 

 

 

 

 Gen. 47:7-8

Gen. 47:5b-11

Gen. 47:7-12

Gen. 47:7-12

Gen. 47:7-12

Gen. 47:9-12

 Gen. 47:12

 

Joseph Deals with the Famine

 

The Famine

Joseph's Agrarian Policy

Gen. 47:13-19

Gen. 47:13-19

Gen. 47:13-19

Gen. 47:13-15

Gen. 47:13-14

 

 

 

 Gen. 47:16-17

Gen. 47:15-17

 

 

 

Gen. 47:18-19

 Gen. 47:18-19

Result of the Famine

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:20-26

Gen. 47:20-26

Gen. 47:20-26

Gen. 47:20-24

Gen. 47:20-22

 

 

 

 Gen. 47:25-26

Gen. 47:23-26

 

Joseph's Vow to Jacob

Jacob's Adoption and Blessings of Ephraim and Manasseh
(Gen. 47:27 to Gen. 48:22)

Jacob's Last Request

Jacob's Last Wishes

Gen. 47:27-28

Gen. 47:27-31

Gen. 47:27-28

Gen. 47:27-30 a

Gen. 47:27-31

Gen. 47:29-31

 

Gen. 47:29-31

 Gen. 47:30 b

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:31

 

From Dr. Bob Utley, Copyright © 2014 Bible Lessons International; www.freebiblecommentary.org; from e-sword; Gen. 47 chapter comments).

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


As always, 3 separate translations will be produced for each verse. The slavishly literal translation attempts to preserve word order and number, making it more literal than Young’s translation (however, I do not preserve the consistency of the translation that Young does). The moderately literal translation may add or delete a definite article, change the number of a noun to correspond with the English sense of thinking, and the order is often changed in order to better represent our English sentence structure. The paraphrase is an attempt to give a thought-for-thought interpretation of what each verse tells us.


Pharaoh Meets' Joseph's Brothers and Father and Gives Them Egyptian Land


Kukis slavishly literal:

 

Kukis moderately literal:

And so goes in Joseph and so he makes known to Pharaoh and so he says, “My father and my brothers and their flock and their herd and all that [is] to them have come from a land of Canaan and behold them in a land of Goshen.”

Genesis

47:1

Joseph went in to Pharaoh and he announced [the arrival of his family], saying, “My father, my brothers, their flocks and their herds and all that [belongs] to them have come from the land of Canaan and observe, they [are] in the land of Goshen [now].”

Kukis not-so-literal paraphrase:

Joseph went in to speak to Pharaoh and to announced the arrival of his family. He told him, “My lord, my father and my brothers have arrive and they have their flocks, herds, and all their belongings in tow with them. They have come from the Canaan and they are now in Goshen.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:

 

Ancient texts:                       Note: I compare the Hebrew text to English translations of the Latin, Syriac (= Aramaic) and Greek texts, using the Douay-Rheims translation; George Lamsa’s translation, and Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton’s translation as revised and edited by Paul W. Esposito, respectively. I often update these texts with non-substantive changes (e.g., you for thou, etc.). I often use the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible instead of Brenton’s translation, because it updates the English text.

 

The Septuagint was the earliest known translation of a book (circa 200 b.c.). Since this translation was made before the textual criticism had been developed into a science and because different books appear to be translated by different men, the Greek translation can sometimes be very uneven.

 

When there are serious disparities between my translation and Brenton’s (or the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible), I look at the Greek text of the Septuagint (the LXX) to see if a substantive difference actually exists (and I reflect these changes in the English rendering of the Greek text). I use the Greek LXX with Strong’s numbers and morphology available for e-sword. The only problem with this resource (which is a problem for similar resources) is, there is no way to further explore Greek verbs which are not found in the New Testament. Although I usually quote the Complete Apostles’ Bible here, I have begun to make changes in the translation when their translation conflicts with the Greek and note what those changes are.

 

The Masoretic text is the Hebrew text with all of the vowels (vowel points) inserted (the original Hebrew text lacked vowels). We take the Masoretic text to be the text closest to the original. However, differences between the Masoretic text and the Greek, Latin and Syriac are worth noting and, once in a great while, represent a more accurate text possessed by those other ancient translators.

 

In general, the Latin text is an outstanding translation from the Hebrew text into Latin and very trustworthy (I say this as a non-Catholic). Unfortunately, I do not read Latin—apart from some very obvious words—so I am dependent upon the English translation of the Latin (principally, the Douay-Rheims translation).

 

Underlined words indicate differences in the text.

 

Bracketed portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls are words, letters and phrases lost in the scroll due to various types of damage. Underlined words or phrases are those in the Dead Sea Scrolls but not in the Masoretic text.

 

I will only list the translation from the Dead Sea Scrolls if it exists and if it is different from the Masoretic text.

 

The Targum of Onkelos is actually the Pentateuchal Targumim, which are The Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan Ben Uzziel. On the Pentateuch With The Fragments of the Jerusalem Targum From the Chaldee by J. W. Etheridge, M.A. From http://www.becomingjewish.org/texts/targum/onkelos_genesis.html and first published in 1862.

 

The very fact that we have ancient Greek, Latin, Syriac and Arabic translations of the Bible testifies to its accuracy. There may be a difference word or phrase here or there; the Greek may have a singular where the Hebrew has a plural, but there is no set of doctrines in the Latin Bible which are any different from those found in the Greek Bible or the Syriac Bible. These different cultures when they chose to translate the Bible chose to translate it as accurately as possible. Where human viewpoint would expect to find doctrinal differences between the Bible of the Hebrews, of the Greeks or of the Romans, no such differences exist.


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so goes in Joseph and so he makes known to Pharaoh and so he says, “My father and my brothers and their flock and their herd and all that [is] to them have come from a land of Canaan and behold them in a land of Goshen.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum (trans. Etheridge)      .

Targum (Onkelos)                  And Joseph came and showed Pharoh, and said, My father and my brethren, and their sheep and their oxen, and all that they have, are come from the land of Kenaan, and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen. Translation for Onkelos and Pseudo-Jonathan by J. W. Etheridge, M.A. (1862).

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And Joseph came and informed Pharoh, and said, My father and my brethren, with their sheep all oxen and all that they have, are come from the land of Kenaan, and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

Jerusalem targum                  .

Revised Douay-Rheims         .

Douay-Rheims 1899 (Amer.) Then Joseph went in and told Pharao, saying: My father and brethren, their sheep and their herds, and all that they possess, are come out of the land of Chanaan: and behold they stay in the land of Gessen.

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Then Yoseph went in and told Pharaoh, and said, "My father and my brothers, with their flocks, their herds, and all that they own, have come out of the land of Canaan; and behold, they are in the land of Goshen."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    THEN Joseph came and informed Pharaoh, and said to him, My father and my brothers and their flocks and their herds and all that they have, are come from the land of Canaan; and, behold, they are now settled in the land of Goshen.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Joseph came and told Pharao, saying, My father, and my brethren, and their cattle, and their oxen, and all their possessions, are come out of the land of Chanaan, and behold, they are in the land of Gesem. This is the New Brenton translation from http://www.katapi.org.uk/

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             .

Easy English                          Joseph went to Pharaoh. He told him, ‘My father and brothers, and all their animals are now in Goshen. They have come from Canaan. And they have brought everything that belongs to them.’

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  Israel Settles in Goshen

Joseph went in to Pharaoh and said, “My father and my brothers and all their families are here. They have all their animals and everything they own from the land of Canaan with them. They are now in the land of Goshen.”

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  .

God’s Word                         Jacob [Israel] Meets Pharaoh

Joseph went and told Pharaoh, “My father and my brothers have arrived from Canaan with their flocks, herds, and everything they have. Now they are in Goshen.”

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

International Children’s B.     .

The Message                         Joseph went to Pharaoh and told him, “My father and brothers with their flocks and herds and everything they own have come from Canaan. Right now they are in Goshen.”

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           .

Contemporary English V.       Joseph took five of his brothers to the king and told him, "My father and my brothers have come from Canaan. They have brought their sheep, goats, cattle, and everything else they own to the region of Goshen." Then he introduced his brothers to the king,

The Living Bible                     Upon their arrival, Joseph went in to see Pharaoh.

“My father and my brothers are here from Canaan,” he reported, “with all their flocks and herds and possessions. They wish to settle in the land of Goshen.”

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             Jacob Settles in Goshen

Joseph went in to the king and said, “My father and my brothers have arrived from Canaan with their flocks and herds and everything they own. They are now in the land of Goshen.”

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           Jacob Blesses Pharaoh

Then Joseph went to see Pharaoh and told him, “My father and my brothers have arrived from the land of Canaan. They have come with all their flocks and herds and possessions, and they are now in the region of Goshen.”


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          So JoSeph went and told Pharaoh: 'My father and brothers have arrived from the land of CanaAn with their cattle, oxen, and all their possessions. And {Look!} they are now in the land of Gesem.'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Joseph’s Family Settles in Goshen

After this, Joseph went to inform Pharaoh. “My father and brothers have come here from Canaan,”a he said, “and they’ve come with their flocks, herds, and everything else they have. I settled them in the Goshen territory!”

New Advent (Knox) Bible       So Joseph approached Pharao with the news that his father and his brethren had brought their sheep and cattle and all they possessed away from Chanaan, and were there in the land of Gessen.

Revised Knox Bible                .

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     Jacob blessed the king of Egypt

Joseph chose five of his older brothers to go with him to talk to the king. He introduced his older brothers to the king, and then he said, “My father and my older brothers and younger brother have come from Canaan land. They have brought all their sheep and goats and cattle and everything else that they own, and they are living now in Goshen region.” The king asked the brothers, “What work do you do?” They replied to the king, “We are shepherds, just as our ancestors were.” This translation mixed vv. 1–2 together. I included v. 3 as well for context.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Joseph was to come in, and was to announce to Pharaoh, even was he to say: My father and my brothers, their small cattle and their large cattle, are to have come in from the solid grounds of Canaan, to the solid grounds of Goshen.

Conservapedia                       .

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                .

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And Joseph went and told Pharao and said: my father and my brethren their sheep and their beasts and all that they have, are come out of the land of Canaan and are in the land of Gosan.

HCSB                                     Pharaoh Welcomes Jacob

So Joseph went and informed Pharaoh: “My father and my brothers, with their sheep and cattle and all that they own, have come from the land of Canaan and are now in the land of Goshen.”

Jubilee Bible 2000                  Then Joseph came and told Pharaoh and said, My father and my brethren and their sheep and their cows and all that they have are come out of the land of Canaan; and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

H. C. Leupold                         CHAPTER XLVII

11. Establishment of Israel in Goshen and Egyptian Famine Measures (47:1-26)

Then Joseph went in and told Pharaoh and said: My father and my brethren, together with their flocks and herds and all that they possess, have come from the land of Canaan; and, see, they are in the land of Goshen.

Lexham English Bible            .

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                Jacob Blesses Pharaoh

Then Joseph came and informed Pharaoh, “My father and my brothers and their flocks and their cattle and everything that belongs to them have come from the land of Canaan, and behold, they are in the land of Goshen.”


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  Joseph went and told Pharaoh, “My father and brothers with their sheep and cattle and all their possessions have come from the land of Canaan to Goshen.”

The Heritage Bible                 And Joseph came, and caused it to stand out boldly to Pharaoh, and said, My father, and my brothers, and their flocks, and their herds, and all that is theirs, have come from the land of Canaan, and behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   Settlement in Goshen.

Joseph went and told Pharaoh, “My father and my brothers have come from the land of Canaan, with their flocks and herds and everything else they own; and they are now in the region of Goshen.”

New Jerusalem Bible             So Joseph went and told Pharaoh, 'My father and brothers have arrived from Canaan with their flocks and cattle and all their possessions. Here they are, in the region of Goshen.'

New Revised Standard V.      .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Then Yosef went in and told Pharaoh, “My father and brothers have come from the land of Kena‘an with their flocks, livestock and all their possessions; right now they are in the land of Goshen.”

exeGeses companion Bible   YAAQOV IN MISRAYIM

Then Yoseph comes and tells Paroh and says,

My father and my brothers

and their flocks and their oxen and all they have

have come from the land of Kenaan;

and behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

Israeli Authorized Version      .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               Then Joseph came and reported to Pharaoh, saying, “My father and my brothers, with their flocks and herds and all that is theirs, have come from the land of Canaan and are now in the region of Goshen.”

Kaplan Translation                 Jacob Arrives in Egypt

Joseph went and told Pharaoh. He said, 'My father and brothers have come from Canaan, along with their sheep, their cattle, and all their belongings. They are now in the Goshen district.' The Kaplan Translation, particularly in Exodus through Deuteronomy, takes note of historic rabbinic opinions.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           Then Yosef came and told Pharaoh, and said, Avi and my achim, and their tzon, and their bakar, and all that they have, are come out of Eretz Kena’an; and they are now in Eretz Goshen.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Jacob Settles in Goshen

Joseph went in and spoke to ·the king [LPharaoh] and said, “My father and my brothers have arrived from Canaan with their flocks and herds and everything they own. They are now in the land of Goshen [45:10].”

Kretzmann’s Commentary    Verses 1-10

Jacob and Five of his Sons Presented to Pharaoh

Then Joseph came, and told Pharaoh, and said, My father and my brethren, and their flocks, and their herds, and all that they have, are come out of the land of Canaan; and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen. This was the formal and official notification of their arrival in Pharaoh's domain.

NET Bible®                             Joseph’s Wise Administration

Joseph went and told Pharaoh, “My father, my brothers, their flocks and herds, and all that they own have arrived from the land of Canaan. They are now [Heb “Look they [are] in the land of Goshen.” Joseph draws attention to the fact of their presence in Goshen.] in the land of Goshen.” When it comes to making an actual material change to the text, the NET Bible® is pretty good about indicating this. Since most of these corrections will be clear in the more literal translations below and within the Hebrew exegesis itself, I will not continue to list every NET Bible® footnote. Language footnotes will be placed in the Hebrew exegesis. Some footnotes will quoted elsewhere in this document.

Syndein/Thieme                     Then Joseph came and told Pharaoh, and kept on saying, My father and my brethren, and their flocks, and their herds, and all that they have, are come out of the land of Canaan; and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

{Note: More 'typology'. Pharaoh is a 'type' of God the Father and Joseph is a 'type' of Jesus Christ. The 'wagons' represented God's provisions and 'my brethren' represent believers in time. Positional Truth - Jesus said "I and the Father am One" - identical characteristics - One in Essence. Believers in Christ are in Union with Christ and Positionally are in Union with Christ and God provides the provisions for us in time.}.

The Voice                               So Joseph went to Pharaoh.

Joseph (to Pharaoh): My father and brothers have arrived from the land of Canaan with their flocks and herds and the rest of their belongings. They are now waiting in the land of Goshen.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Yoseph [Adding] came and he told to Paroh [Great house], and he said, my father and my brothers and their flocks and their cattle and all which belonged to them came from the land of Kena'an [Lowered] and look at them in the land of Goshen [Draw near],...

Concordant Literal Version    And coming is Joseph and telling Pharaoh, and is saying to him, "My father and my brothers, and their flocks and their herds, and all that is theirs, come from the land of Canaan. And behold them in the land of Goshen.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      Jacob's Family Settles in Goshen

So Joseph went in and told Pharaoh, “My father and my brothers, with their flocks and herds and all that they possess, have come from the land of Canaan. They are now in the land of Goshen.”

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    And Joseph came in and made known to Pharaoh, and said, My father and my brothers, and their flocks and their herds, and all which is theirs, have come in from the land of Canaan. And, behold, they are in the land of Goshen. Green placed the final sentence with v. 2.

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Niobi Study Bible                   Joseph Is Governor of Egypt
Then Joseph came and told Pharaoh, and said, "My father and my brethren, and their flocks and their herds and all that they have, have come out of the land of Canaan; and behold, they are in the land of Goshen."

NASB                                     Jacob’s Family Settles in Goshen

Then Joseph went in and told Pharaoh, and said, “My father and my brothers and their flocks and their herds and all that they have, have come out of the land of Canaan; and behold, they are in the land of Goshen.”

New European Version          Jacob’s Family Settle in Egypt

Then Joseph went in and told Pharaoh, and said, My father and my brothers, with their flocks, their herds, and all that they own, have come out of the land of Canaan; and behold, they are in the land of Goshen.

New King James Version       Then Joseph went and told Pharaoh, and said, “My father and my brothers, their flocks and their herds and all that they possess, have come from the land of Canaan; and indeed they are in the land of Goshen.”

Owen's Translation                .

Ron Snider’s Translation       .

Stuart Wolf’s Translation       .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Joseph comes, and declares to Pharaoh, and says, “My father, and my brothers, and their flock, and their herd, and all they have, have come from the land of Canaan, and lo, they are in the land of Goshen.”

 

The gist of this passage:     Joseph comes in and speaks to Pharaoh, telling him that this family has all arrived, with all of their possessions, and they are now in the land of Goshen.


Genesis 47:1a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415


Translation: Joseph went in to Pharaoh... Joseph goes in to speak to Pharaoh. In the Hebrew, to Pharaoh is with the next phrase. However, it makes more sense in the English to place that here.


Interestingly enough, Joseph will not always have this same relationship to Pharaoh. In Gen. 50:4–5, we read: And when the days of weeping for him were past, Joseph spoke to the household of Pharaoh, saying, "If now I have found favor in your eyes, please speak in the ears of Pharaoh, saying, 'My father made me swear, saying, "I am about to die: in my tomb that I hewed out for myself in the land of Canaan, there shall you bury me." Now therefore, let me please go up and bury my father. Then I will return.'"


Genesis 47:1b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

nâgad (נָגַד) [pronounced naw-GAHD]

to make conspicuous, to make known, to expound, to explain, to declare, to inform, to confess, to make it pitifully obvious that

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect

Strong's #5046 BDB #616

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829


Translation: ...and he announced [the arrival of his family],... Joseph makes an announcement to Pharaoh. Pharaoh knew that Joseph’s family were coming—in fact, Pharaoh made provision for Joseph’s family, sending wagons up to Canaan for them to load up with all of their stuff. No doubt, Pharaoh said at that time, “Please tell me when they have arrived.”


Genesis 47:1c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾâb (אָב) [pronounced awbv]

father, both as the head of a household, clan or tribe; ancestor, grandfather; founder, civil leader, military leader; master, teacher

masculine singular noun with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

tsôʾn (צֹאן) [pronounced tzohn]

small cattle, sheep and goats, flock, flocks

feminine singular collective noun with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #6629 BDB #838

Also spelled tseʾôwn (צְאוֹן) [pronounced tseh-OWN].

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

bâqâr (בָּקָר) [pronounced baw-KAWR]

bull, cow, ox, collectively: herd, cattle, oxen

masculine singular collective noun with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #1241 BDB #133

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

kôl (כֹּל) [pronounced kohl]

the whole, all, the entirety, every

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #3605 BDB #481

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced ash-ER]

that, which, when, who, whom; where

relative pronoun

Strong's #834 BDB #81

Together, kôl ʾăsher mean all which, all whom, all that [which]; whomever, whatever, whatever else, all whose, all where, wherever.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

3rd person masculine plural, singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, of, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Kenaʿan (כְּנַעַן) [pronounced keNAH-ģahn]

which possibly means merchant and is transliterated Canaan

masculine proper noun; territory; pausal form

Strong’s #3667 BDB #488


Translation: ...saying, “My father, my brothers, their flocks and their herds and all that [belongs] to them have come from the land of Canaan... Joseph gives a reasonably detailed account; his family has arrived and it is his father and brothers, along with their animals and all of their belongings.


Their wives and children are not named specifically. Perhaps this would be understood as a part of and all that is to them.


Genesis 47:1d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

hinnêh (הִנֵּה) [pronounced hin-NAY]

lo, behold, or more freely, observe, look here, look, listen, note, take note, duly note [that]; pay attention, get this, check this out

interjection, exclamatory particle, demonstrative particle; with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #2009 (and #518, 2006) BDB #243

With the 3rd person masculine plural suffix, hinnêh literally means behold them; however, it is an idiom which seems to mean, they are here, they are right here. Others translate this and indeed they [are] (NKJV); behold, they [are] (NASB, NEV); they are now (ESV, ExB, JPS, NET Bible, NLT, the Voice); here they are (NJB); and, see, they are (Leupold) (translations taken from Gen. 47:1).

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Goshen (גֹּשֶן) [pronounced GOH-sheen]

 a drawing near; and is transliterated Goshen

proper noun/location

Strong’s #1657 BDB #177

BDB: [Goshen is] a region in northern Egypt, east of the lower Nile, where the children of Israel lived from the time of Joseph to the time of Moses.


Translation: ...and observe, they [are] in the land of Goshen [now].” I believe that Joseph lives in Goshen and that he wants his family to be with him.


This appears to be set apart from the general Egyptian population. I base this on two things: (1) Joseph’s eagerness to have his family placed there; (2) the importance of separation of the Jewish people. You may recall that one of the great threats to the nascent Jewish people was being intermixed with other races or families (Gen. 34 is only one example of this).


This is all proper protocol which Joseph is displaying here. He has informed Pharaoh of his being reunited with his family and Pharaoh told him to bring the family to Egypt. Now that they have arrived, they are of a significant enough number to work out whatever legal details must be worked out in order for them to dwell in the land of Goshen.


Genesis 47:1d And behold, they are in the land of Goshen.”


For some reason, this is Gen. 47:2a in the MKJV.


This suggests that Goshen has to be on the border of Egypt, as this is where Joseph’s fathers and brothers stopped their caravan.


Genesis 47:1 Then Joseph came and told Pharaoh, and said, “My father and my brothers, and their flocks, and their herds, and all that they have, have come out of the land of Canaan. And behold, they are in the land of Goshen.”


You will notice how Joseph prepares Pharaoh for the fact that his brothers are all ranchers. They arrive with their flocks and herds. Joseph makes this announcement before the court of Pharaoh.


It is reasonable to assume that Pharaoh has no little knowledge of geography and that he knows where Canaan is. Most or all of the Pharaohs of Egypt would know geography and history.


——————————



And from a whole of his brothers he took five men. And so he makes to them to stand to faces of Pharaoh. And so says Pharaoh unto his brothers, “What [is] your occupation?” And so they say unto Pharaoh, “A shepherd of a flock your servants [are] also we also our fathers.”

Genesis

47:2–3

He took five of his brothers and placed them before Pharaoh. Pharaoh said to his brothers, “What [is] your occupation?” And they said, “Your servants [are] shepherds of the flock, both we and our father.”

Joseph took five of his brothers and he brought them to stand before Pharaoh. The Pharaoh asked his brothers, “What do you do for a living?” They answered, “We are shepherds, just as our fathers were.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And from a whole of his brothers he took five men. And so he makes to them to stand to faces of Pharaoh. And so says Pharaoh unto his brothers, “What [is] your occupation?” And so they say unto Pharaoh, “A shepherd of a flock your servants [are] also we also our fathers.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And of the extreme [Of the entire number comprised between the first and last?] of his brethren he took five men, and made them stand before Pharoh. And Pharoh said to his brethren, What are your employments? And they said to Pharoh, thy servants are shepherds; both we and our fathers.

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And from the extreme of his brethren he took five men, Zebulon, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, and Asher, and resented them before Pharoh. And Pharoh said to Joseph's brethren, What is your work? And they said to Pharoh, Thy servants are pastors of sheep, both we and our fathers.

Revised Douay-Rheims         Five men also the last of his brethren, he presented before the king:

And he asked them: What is your occupation? They answered: We thy servants are shepherds, both we, and our fathers.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        From among his brothers he took five men, and presented them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh said to his brothers, "What is your occupation?" They said to Pharaoh, "Your servants are shepherds, both we, and our fathers."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And he took from among his brothers five men and presented them to Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to Josephs brothers, What is your occupation? And they said to Pharaoh, Your servants are shepherds, both we and also our fathers, from our youth.

Septuagint (Greek)                And he took of his brethren five men, and set them before Pharaoh. And Pharao said to the brethren of Joseph, What is your occupation? and they said to Pharao, Your servants are shepherds, both we and our father.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             .

Easy English                          Joseph chose 5 of his brothers. And he took them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh asked the brothers, ‘What is your job?’ The brothers replied, ‘We are shepherds. And our ancestors were shepherds.’

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  .

God’s Word                         Since he had taken five of his brothers with him, he presented them to Pharaoh.

Pharaoh asked the brothers, “What kind of work do you do?”

They answered Pharaoh, “We are shepherds, as were our ancestors.

Good News Bible (TEV)         So Joseph took five of his brothers and went to the king. He told him, “My father and my brothers have come from Canaan with their flocks, their herds, and all that they own. They are now in the region of Goshen.” He then presented his brothers to the king. The king asked them, “What is your occupation?”

“We are shepherds, sir, just as our ancestors were,” they answered. The GNB combines vv. 1 & 2; so v. 1 is included for context.

International Children’s B.     Joseph chose five of his brothers to introduce to the king.

The king said to the brothers, “What work do you do?”

And they said to him, “We, your servants, are shepherds. Our ancestors were also shepherds.”

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              Then he presented his brothers to the king. The king asked: »What is your occupation?« »We are shepherds, Sir, just as our ancestors were,« they answered.


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           From all of his brothers, he selected five men and presented them before Pharaoh.

Pharaoh said to Joseph’s brothers, “What do you do?”

They said to Pharaoh, “Your servants are shepherds, both we and our ancestors.”

Contemporary English V.       Joseph took five of his brothers to the king and told him, "My father and my brothers have come from Canaan. They have brought their sheep, goats, cattle, and everything else they own to the region of Goshen." Then he introduced his brothers to the king, who asked them, "What do you do for a living?" "Sir, we are shepherds," was their answer. "Our families have always raised sheep.

But in our country all the pastures are dried up, and our sheep have no grass to eat. So we, your servants, have come here. Please let us live in the region of Goshen." Vv. 1 & 4 are included for context.

The Living Bible                     .

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           .


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Then he took five of his brothers and brought them before Pharaoh. And when Pharaoh asked them, 'What is your occupation?' they replied, 'Your servants (both we and our father) are shepherds.'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        He brought along five of his brothers to present before Pharaoh.

Pharaoh asked his brothers, “What are your occupations?”

“Your servants are shepherds,” they replied, “both we and our ancestors.

New Advent (Knox) Bible       He also presented his five youngest brethren to the king, and these, when the king asked what their employment was, answered, Thy servants are shepherds, as their fathers were before them.

Revised Knox Bible                .

Translation for Translators     .


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   He is to have taken a segment of his brothers, five men, and was to set them, turned before Pharaoh. Pharaoh was to say to his brothers: Your occupation is? They were to say to Pharaoh: Your servants are to shepherd small cattle, as our fathers.

Conservapedia                       He took five of his brothes, from among those having the most extensive households [The Hebrew word translates as "outstanding."], and presented them at court. Pharaoh said to his brothers, "What is your occupation"? And they said to Pharaoh, "Your servants are shepherds, both we and our fathers before us." Joseph had encouraged them to lie. But when they were presented at court, they told the truth.

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                Then he selected five from his brothers to take and present to Pharoh, and Pharoh asked his brothers, " What is your business ? "' When they replied to Pharoh, " Your slaves are shepherds of sheep, — as we are, so were our fathers."

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And Joseph took a part of his brethren: even five of them, and presented them unto Pharao. And Pharao said unto his brethren: what is your occupation? And they said unto Pharao: shepherds are your servants, both we and also our fathers.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  And of the least of his brethren he took five men and presented them unto Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said unto his brethren, What is your occupation? And they said unto Pharaoh, Thy slaves are pastors of sheep, both we and also our fathers.

Lexham English Bible            And from among his brothers he took five men and presented them before Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brothers, "What [is] your occupation?" And they said to Pharaoh, "Your servants [are] keepers of sheep, both we and also our ancestors."

H. C. Leupold                         Now he had taken five men from the total number of his brethren, and he presented them unto Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brethren: What is your business? And they said to Pharaoh: Shepherds of flocks thy servants are—both we and our fathers.

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         .

Wikipedia Bible Project          And from among his brothers he took five, and he presented them before Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brothers: "What do you do?" and they said to Pharaoh, shepherds are your servants--- ourselves and our fathers also."


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 And he took five men out of his brothers, and placed them before the face of Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brothers, What is your occupation? And they said to Pharaoh, Your servants are shepherds of flocks, both we and our fathers.

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   He then presented to Pharaoh five of his brothers whom he had selected from their full number. When Pharaoh asked them, “What is your occupation?” they answered, “We, your servants, like our ancestors, are shepherds.

New Jerusalem Bible             He had taken five of his brothers, and he now presented them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh asked his brothers, 'What is your occupation?' and they gave Pharaoh the answer, 'Your servants are shepherds, like our fathers before us.'

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            He had chosen five of his brothers, and he brought them into Pharaoh's presence. When he asked them what their occupation was, they answered, “We are shepherds like our fathers before us, and we have come to stay in this country, because owing to the severe famine in Canaan there is no pasture there for our flocks. We ask your majesty's leave to settle now in Goshen.” V. 4 is included for context.


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           .

exeGeses companion Bible   And Paroh says to his brothers, What is your work?

And they say to Paroh, Your servants tend flocks

- both we and our fathers.

And they say to Paroh,

We come to sojourn in the land;

for your servants have no pasture for their flocks;

for the famine is heavy in the land of Kenaan:

and now, we beseech you,

that you settle your servants in the land of Goshen.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               And selecting a few of his brothers, he presented them to Pharaoh. 3Pharaoh said to his brothers, “What is your occupation?” They answered Pharaoh, “We your servants are shepherds, as were also our fathers.

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 From among his brothers, he selected five men [ome say that these were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Issachar and Benjamin, the weakest of the brothers (Bereshith Rabbah 95; Rashi). According to others, they were the strongest of the brothers: Zebulun, Dan, Naphtali, Gad and Asher (Targum Yonathan; Bava Kama 92a).] and presented them to Pharaoh.

Pharaoh asked [Joseph's] brothers, 'What is your occupation?'

'We are shepherds,' they replied to Pharaoh, 'we and our fathers before us.'

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And he took some of his achim, even five anashim, and presented them unto Pharaoh.

And Pharaoh said unto his achim, What is your occupation? And they said unto Pharaoh, Thy avadim are roeh tzon, both we, and also Avoteinu.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                He took five men from among his brothers and presented them to Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brothers [as Joseph expected], “What is your occupation?” And they said to Pharaoh, “Your servants are shepherds, both we and our fathers [before us].”

The Expanded Bible              Joseph ·chose [took] five of his brothers to ·introduce [present] to ·the king [LPharaoh].

·The king [LPharaoh] said to his brothers, “What work do you do?”

And they said to him, “We, your servants, are shepherds, just as our ·ancestors [fathers] were.”

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And he took some of his brethren, out of their total number, even five men, and presented them unto Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said unto his brethren, What is your occupation? And they said unto Pharaoh, Thy servants are shepherds, both we and also our fathers. As Joseph had foreseen the question of Pharaoh, so his instruction to his brothers had just covered the case.

NET Bible®                             He took five of his brothers and introduced them to Pharaoh [Heb “and from the whole of his brothers he took five men and presented them before Pharaoh.”].

Pharaoh said to Joseph’s [Heb “his”; the referent (Joseph) has been specified in the translation for clarity.] brothers, “What is your occupation?” They said to Pharaoh, “Your servants take care of flocks, just as our ancestors did [Heb “both we and our fathers.”].”

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Now Joseph had chosen five of his brothers and brought them along to present to Pharaoh.

Pharaoh (to Joseph’s brothers): What is your occupation?

Joseph’s Brothers: Your servants are shepherds. We tend sheep and goats as our ancestors did before us.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and from the far end of his brothers he took five men and he presented them to the face of Paroh [Great house], and Paroh [Great house] said to his brothers, what is your work, and they said to Paroh [Great house], your servants are feeders of the flocks, us and also our fathers,...

Concordant Literal Version    And from the outstanding men of his brothers he takes with him five mortals, and putting them is he before Pharaoh. And saying is Pharaoh to Joseph's brothers, "What is your occupation?And saying are they to Pharaoh, "Graziers of flocks are your servants, both we and our forefathers.

Context Group Version          And from among his brothers he took five men, and presented them to Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brothers, What is your (pl) occupation? And they said to Pharaoh, Your slaves are shepherds, both we, and our fathers.

Darby Translation                  And he took from the whole number of his brethren, five men, and set them before Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to his brethren, What is your occupation? And they said to Pharaoh, Thy servants are shepherds, both we and our fathers.

Emphasized Bible                  Moreover out of the whole number of his brethren, he took with him five men,—and set them before Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said unto the brethren of Joseph—What is your occupation? And they said unto Pharaoh—Feeders of flocks, are thy servants, both we and our fathers.

English Standard Version      .

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         He took five men from among his brothers and presented them before Pharaoh.

Pharaoh asked his brothers, “What is your occupation?”

And they said to Pharaoh, “Your servants are shepherds, both we and also our fathers.”

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          .

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And out of his brothers he has taken five men, and sets them before Pharaoh; and Pharaoh says unto his brothers, “What are your works?” and they say unto Pharaoh, “Your servants are feeders of a flock, both we and our fathers;”

 

The gist of this passage:     Joseph takes 5 of his brothers and presents them to Pharaoh. When asked about their work, they tell Pharaoh that they are all shepherds.

2-3

Genesis 47:2a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, of, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

qâtseh (קָצֶה) [pronounced kaw-TSEH]

end, extremity, outskirts; the whole, the sum

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #7097 BDB #892

With the min preposition, it means from the end of; at the end of; after.

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26

lâqach (לָקַח) [pronounced law-KAHKH]

to take, to take away, to take in marriage; to seize

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #3947 BDB #542

chămishshâh (חֲמִשָּה) [pronounced khuh-mish-SHAW]

five

feminine singular numeral

Strong’s #2568 BDB #331

ʾănâshîym (אֲנָשִים) [pronounced uh-NAW-sheem]; also spelled ʾîyshîym (אִישִים) [pronounced ee-SHEEM]

men; inhabitants, citizens; companions; soldiers, followers

masculine plural noun

Strong's #376 BDB #35


Translation: He took five of his brothers... I have skipped a portion of the Hebrew, where Joseph has take from the end of his brothers. This suggests that Joseph chose either the 5 oldest brothers or 5 of them who were standing off to one side.


Interestingly enough, Joseph knows enough about his brothers not to bring them all out, but only half of them. There is no doubt a reason for this, although I am not certain what that reason is. Perhaps there would be less talking and confusion to have only 5 of them there.


Joseph did not want to fill Pharaoh's room with all of his family, but he did want to bring a significant number of them and those who would make a good impression on Pharaoh. This is a formal introduction to the leader of the land who will make a legal determination as to where these immigrants will stay.


Perhaps the number of brothers which Joseph brings forward is intentionally smaller than Pharaoh and his staff.


Genesis 47:2b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

yâtsag (יָצַג) [pronounced yaw-TSAHG]

to make to stand, to set, to station, to place, to leave, to establish, to let stay

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #3322 BDB #426

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

pânîym (פָּנִים) [pronounced paw-NEEM]

face, faces, countenance; presence

masculine plural construct (plural acts like English singular)

Strong’s #6440 BDB #815

Together, they mean upon the face of, before, before the face of, in the presence of, in the sight of, in front of. When used with God, it can take on the more figurative meaning in the judgment of. This can also mean forwards; the front part [or, the edge of a sword]. Lepânîym (לְפָּנִים) can take on a temporal sense as well: before, of old, formerly, in the past, in past times. Literally, this means to faces of.

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829


Translation: ...and placed them before Pharaoh. Joseph brings his brothers and presents them to Pharaoh.


Genesis 47:2 And he took some of his brothers, five men, and presented them to Pharaoh.


Joseph chose 5 of his brothers to meet Pharaoh (which I find interesting in itself). It would be my guess that this is about the maximum number of brothers that Pharaoh could meet and keep easily differentiated in his head.


Genesis 47:3a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26

mâh (מָה) [pronounced maw]

what, how, why; what [thing]; anything, something, whatever

interrogative; exclamatory particle; indefinite pronoun; relative pronoun

Strong’s #4100 BDB #552

occupation with the 2nd person masculine plural suffix

 

 

 


Translation: Pharaoh said to his brothers, “What [is] your occupation?” Then, just as it is today, nearly the first thing a man asks another man (or a woman asks a man) is, what do you do for a living? Not often, do you meet someone and the first thing they say is, “So, what is your favorite color?” Or, “How much money is in your wallet right now?” Or, “How old are you?” (unless the child is 16 or younger) A man is very much associated with his work. That is a normal thing, and, Biblical as well.


My assumption here is, Pharaoh is also thinking about how he will integrate these men into his society. These men are immigrating into his country, and he appears to want this to work out. Their occupations are key.


Genesis 47:3b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829

râʿâh (רָעָה) [pronounced raw-ĢAWH]

shepherding, tending [a flock]; a shepherd, herdsman, one who tends sheep

masculine singular, Qal active participle; construct form

Strong’s #7462 BDB #944

tsôʾn (צֹאן) [pronounced tzohn]

small cattle, sheep and goats, flock, flocks

feminine singular collective noun

Strong’s #6629 BDB #838

ʿebâdîym (עְבָדִים) [pronounced ģeb-vaw-DEEM]

slaves, servants; workers; underlings; subjects; slavery, bondage, servitude; this can mean military men, soldiers in the plural

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #5650 BDB #713


Translation: And they said, “Your servants [are] shepherds of the flock,... Recall that Joseph told them that this would be the proper answer. It is not dishonest; Joseph does not want them coming up with any weird angle or anything else.


Apparently, Joseph could guide them into the land of Goshen with him, which is his intention.


Genesis 47:3c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

gam (גַם) [pronounced gahm]

both...and, furthermore...as well as, also...also, that...so; either...or (but not used disjunctively)

when gam is repeated

Strong’s #1571 BDB #168

ʾănachenûw (אֲנַחְנוּ) [pronounced uh-NAHKH-noo]

we; (sometimes a verb is implied)

1st person plural pronoun

Strong’s #587 BDB #59

gam (גַם) [pronounced gahm]

both...and, furthermore...as well as, also...also, that...so; either...or (but not used disjunctively)

when gam is repeated

Strong’s #1571 BDB #168

ʾâbôwth (אָבוֹת) [pronounced awb-VOOTH]

fathers, ancestors, both as the heads of households, clans or tribes; founders, civil leaders, military leaders

masculine plural noun with the 1st person plural suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3


Translation: ...both we and our father.” Many translations have as is our father here, which reasonably and loosely translates the Hebrew phrase. The idea here is, this is what they have been trained to do from their youth up; this has been the occupation of their father and grandfather for a long time.


None of them are saying, “We are shepherds, but we’d like to try our hand at house painting.”


Genesis 47:3 And Pharaoh said to his brothers, “What is your occupation?” And they said to Pharaoh, “Your servants are shepherds, both we and our fathers.”


You will note that conversation between men has not changed much in 4000 years. When you meet some new people, almost inevitably, one of the first questions asked—particularly of males—is, what do you do for a living?


This appears to be Pharaoh’s first question to the brothers.


When they claim to be shepherds, we and our fathers; they are referring back to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. This suggests that they are unlikely to adopt a new profession.


——————————



And they said unto Pharaoh, “To live in the land we have come, for [there is] no pasture for the flock which [are] to your servants, for was great the famine in a land of Canaan. And now would remain please your servants in a land of Goshen.”

Genesis

47:4

They said to Pharaoh, “We have come [in order] to live in the land [here], for [there is] no pasture for the flocks which [belong] to your servants, because the famine was great in the land of Canaan. Therefore, your servants would [like] to live in the land of Goshen.”

They then said to Pharaoh, “We have come here in order to live in your land, for there is not enough sufficient pastureland for us because the famine was great Canaan. Therefore, your servants are making a formal request to live in the land of Goshen.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And they said unto Pharaoh, “To live in the land we have come, for [there is] no pasture for the flock which [are] to your servants, for was great the famine in a land of Canaan. And now would remain please your servants in a land of Goshen.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And they said to Pharoh, To dwell in the land are we come for there is no pasture for thy servants' flocks; for the famine prevails in the land of Kenaan, and we pray thee let thy servants dwell in the land of Goshen.

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And they said to Pharoh, To dwell in the land are we come, because there is no place of pasture for thy servants' sheep, for the famine hath prevailed in the land of Kenaan; let thy servants therefore now dwell in the land of Goshen.

Revised Douay-Rheims         We are come to sojourn in thy land, because there is no grass for the flocks of thy servants, the famine being very grievous in the land of Chanaan: and we pray thee to give orders that we thy servants may be in the land of Gessen.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        They said to Pharaoh, "We have come to live as foreigners in the land, for there is no pasture for your servants' flocks. For the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. Now therefore, please let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    They said moreover to Pharaoh, We have come to sojourn in the land; for there is no pasture for your servants flocks; for the famine is severe in the land of Canaan; now, therefore, let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen.

Septuagint (Greek)                And they said to Pharao, We are come to sojourn in the land, for there is no pasture for the flocks of your servants, for the famine has prevailed in the land of Chanaan; now then, we will dwell in the land of Gesem. And Pharao said to Joseph, Let them dwell in the land of Gesem; and if you know that there are among them able men, make them overseers of my cattle. So Jacob and his sons came into Egypt, to Joseph; and Pharao, king of Egypt, heard of it.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And they said to Pharaoh, We have come to make a living in this land, because we have no grass for our flocks in the land of Canaan; so now let your servants make a place for themselves in the land of Goshen.

Easy English                          They said to Pharaoh, ‘We have come here because the famine is very bad in Canaan. We would like to stay here for a while because our animals do not have any grass to eat. Now, please let us, who are your servants, stay in Goshen.’

International Children’s B.     hey said to the king, “We have come to live in this land. There is no grass in the land of Canaan for our animals to eat. The hunger is very terrible there. So please allow us to live in the land of Goshen.”

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  The brothers said to Pharaoh, “Sir, we are shepherds, just as our ancestors were shepherds before us.” They said to Pharaoh, “The famine is very bad in Canaan. There are no fields left with grass for our animals, so we have come to live in this land. We ask you to please let us live in Goshen.” A portion of v. 3 is included for context.

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

The Message                         He had taken five of his brothers with him and introduced them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh asked them, “What kind of work do you do?”

“Your servants are shepherds, the same as our fathers were. We have come to this country to find a new place to live. There is no pasture for our flocks in Canaan. The famine has been very bad there. Please, would you let your servants settle in the region of Goshen?” Vv. 2–3 are included for context.

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      They also said to him, “We’ve come to live in Egypt for a while. There isn’t enough food anywhere in Canaan. There isn’t any grass for our flocks. So please let us live in Goshen.”

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           They continued, “We’ve come to the land as immigrants because the famine is so severe in the land of Canaan that there are no more pastures for your servants’ flocks. Please allow your servants to settle in the land of Goshen.”

Contemporary English V.       But in our country all the pastures are dried up, and our sheep have no grass to eat. So we, your servants, have come here. Please let us live in the region of Goshen."

The Living Bible                     And they replied, “We are shepherds like our ancestors. We have come to live here in Egypt, for there is no pasture for our flocks in Canaan—the famine is very bitter there. We request permission to live in the land of Goshen.”

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             They said to the king, “We have come to live in this land, because there is no grass in the land of Canaan for our animals to eat, and the hunger is terrible there. So please allow us to live in the land of Goshen.”

New Life Version                    They said to Pharaoh, "We have come to live in the land, for there is no field with food for our flocks. The time without food is hard in the land of Canaan. So now we ask of you, let your servants live in the land of Goshen."

New Living Translation           We have come to live here in Egypt for a while, for there is no pasture for our flocks in Canaan. The famine is very severe there. So please, we request permission to live in the region of Goshen.”


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Then they said to Pharaoh: 'We have come to stay in [your] land, because there is no pasture for your servant's flocks, due to the famine in the land of CanaAn. So now we are living in the land of Gesem.'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        We’ve come to live for a while [The Heb. lacks for a while] in this region, since there is no pasture back in Canaan [The Heb. lacks back in Canaan] for your servants’ flocks. May your servants please live in the Goshen territory?”

New Advent (Knox) Bible       .

Revised Knox Bible                We have come to seek hospitality in this land of yours, my lord, because the drought lies heavy on Chanaan, and there is no pasture for our flocks; our plea is, that you would grant your servants a home in the country of Gessen.

Translation for Translators     They also said to him, “We have come here to live for a while in this land, because the famine is very severe in Canaan, and our animals have no ◂pasture/grass to eat► there. So now, please let us live in the Goshen region.”


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   They were to say to Pharaoh: To stay on these solid grounds are we to have come - is there for your servants, pasture for the small cattle? For the famine is grievous on the solid grounds of Canaan, that your servants were to inhabit the solid grounds of Goshen.

Conservapedia                       They also said to Pharaoh, "We have come to stay temporarily in the land. Your servants have no pasture for their flocks, because the famine is severe in Canaan. So please, let us live in the land of Goshen."

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                They also said to Pharoh, " We have come to reside in the land, for there is no pasture for your slaves' sheep, because the famine is heavy in the land of Canan, so allow your slaves to live in the land of Goshen."

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           They said moreover unto Pharao: for to sojourn in the land are we come, for your servants have no pasture for their sheep so sore is the famishment in the land of Canaan. Now therefore let your servants dwell in the land of Gosan.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         They said moreover unto Pharaoh: To sojourn in the land have we come; for there is no pasture for the flocks which thy servants have—for the famine is heavy in the land of Canaan. May thy servants, pray, settle in the land of Goshen.

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                Then they said to Pharaoh, “We came to dwell temporarily in the land, since there is no pasture for the flocks that belong to your servants, for the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. So now, please let your servants live in the land of Goshen.”

Urim-Thummim Version         They also said to Pharaoh, we have come to live in the land, for there is no pasture for the flock that your servants have, for oppressive is the famine in the land of Canaan; so now, let your servants live in the land of Goshen.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And they said to pharaoh "We came to inhabit the land, because there are no pastures for your servants' sheep, because the hunger is heavy in the land of Canaan; and now your servants will please settle in the land of Goshen."


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  We have come to settle in the land for there is no more pasture for our sheep, so severe is the famine in the land of Canaan. And now we pray you, may we stay in the land of Goshen?”

The Heritage Bible                 And they said to Pharaoh, We have come to reside temporarily in the land, because your servants have no pasture for their flocks, because the famine is heavy in the land of Canaan; and now, please, let your servants sit down in the land of Goshen.

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   We have come,” they continued, “in order to sojourn in this land, for there is no pasture for your servants’ flocks, because the famine has been severe in the land of Canaan. So now please let your servants settle in the region of Goshen.” Ex 23:9; Dt 23:8.

New Jerusalem Bible             They went on to tell Pharaoh, 'We have come to stay in this country for the time being, since there is no pasturage for your servants' flocks, Canaan being stricken with famine. So now please allow your servants to settle in the region of Goshen.'

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           He took five of his brothers and presented them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh said to his brothers, “What is your occupation?” They answered Pharaoh, “Your servants are shepherds, both we and our ancestors,” and added, “We have come to live in the land, because in the land of Kena‘an there is no place to pasture your servant’s flocks, the famine is so severe there. Therefore, please, let your servants live in the land of Goshen.” Vv. 1–3 are included for context.

exeGeses companion Bible   And they say to Paroh,

We come to sojourn in the land;

for your servants have no pasture for their flocks;

for the famine is heavy in the land of Kenaan:

and now, we beseech you,

that you settle your servants in the land of Goshen.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               .

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 'We have come to stay awhile in your land,' they explained to Pharaoh, 'because there is no grazing for our flocks, so severe is the famine in Canaan. If you allow us, we will settle in the Goshen district.'

Orthodox Jewish Bible           They said morever unto Pharaoh, For to sojourn in the land are we come; for thy avadim have no mireh (pasture) for their tzon; for the ra’av (famine) is heavy in Eretz Kena’an; now therefore, let now thy avadim dwell in Eretz Goshen.

The Scriptures 1998              And they said to Pharaoh, “We have come to dwell in the land, because there is no pasture for your servant’s flocks, for the scarcity of food is severe in the land of Kenaʽan. And now, please let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen.”


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              They said to ·the king [LPharaoh], “We have come to ·live [sojourn; reside as aliens] in this land, because there is no ·grass in the land of Canaan for our animals to eat [Lpasturage for the flocks of your servants], and the ·hunger [famine] is ·terrible [severe; heavy] there. So please allow ·us [Lyour servants] to live in the land of Goshen.”

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    They said moreover unto Pharaoh, for to sojourn in the land, to live here only a while as strangers, are we come; for thy servants have no pasture for their flocks; for the famine is sore in the land of Canaan. Now, therefore, we pray thee, let thy servants dwell in the land of Goshen.

NET Bible®                             Then they said to Pharaoh, “We have come to live as temporary residents [Heb “to sojourn.”] in the land. There [Heb “for there.”] is no pasture for your servants’ flocks because the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. So now, please let your servants live in the land of Goshen.”

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Joseph’s Brothers: We’ve come to reside in this land as foreigners for a time because there is no place in the land of Canaan for us to pasture our flocks on account of the severity of the famine. Now please, allow your servants to settle in the land of Goshen until this famine is over.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and they said to Paroh [Great house], to sojourn in the land have we come given that no pastures for the flocks which belong to your servants given that the hunger is heavy in the land of Kena'an [Lowered] and now, please, your servants will settle in the land of Goshen [Draw near],...

Concordant Literal Version    .

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      They said to Pharaoh, "We have come to sojourn in the land, for there is no pasture for your servants' flocks, for the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. And now, please let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen."

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    And they said to Pharaoh, We have come in to stay in the land, because there is no pasture for the flocks which belong to your servants, for the famine is heavy in the land of Canaan. And now please let your servants live in the land of Goshen.

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          .

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   And they said to Pharaoh, To sojourn in the land we have come; for there is no pasture for your slaves' flocks; for the famine is intense in the land of Canaan: now therefore, we pray you, let your slaves dwell in the land of Goshen.

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                They also said to Pharaoh, “We have come to live as foreigners in the land, for there is no pasture for your servants’ flocks. For the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. Now therefore, please let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen.”

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And they say unto Pharaoh, “To sojourn in the land we have come, for there is no pasture for the flock which your servants have, for grievous is the famine in the land of Canaan; and now, let your servants, we pray you, dwell in the land of Goshen.

 

The gist of this passage:     Joseph’s brothers ask permission to live in the land of Egypt, as Canaan has been devastated by the famine.


Genesis 47:4a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

Owens lists this as a wâw conjunction, but it is a wâw consecutive.

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

gûwr (גּוּר) [pronounced goor]

to reside, to temporarily reside, to sojourn; to reside without ownership; to gather together with, band together with

Qal infinitive construct

Strong’s #1481 BDB #157

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #776 BDB #75

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

1st person plural, singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97


Translation: They said to Pharaoh, “We have come [in order] to live in the land [here],... At this point, the brothers of Joseph make a formal request of Pharaoh. It properly requires his permission for them to live in Egypt.


Genesis 47:4b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

for, that, because; when, at that time, which, what time

explanatory or temporal conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

The NET Bible: The Hebrew uses a causal particle to connect what follows with what precedes. The translation divides the statement into two sentences for stylistic reasons.

ʾêyn (אֵין) [pronounced ān]

nothing, not, [is] not; not present, not ready; expresses non-existence, absence or non-possession; [there is] no [none, not one, no one, not]

particle of negation; substantive of negation

Strong’s #369 BDB #34

mireʿeh (מִרְעֶה) [pronounced meer-ĢEH]

fodder for cattle; feeding place [for wild beasts]; pasturage, pasture

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #4829 BDB #945

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

tsôʾn (צֹאן) [pronounced tzohn]

small cattle, sheep and goats, flock, flocks

feminine singular collective noun with the definite article

Strong’s #6629 BDB #838

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced ash-ER]

that, which, when, who, whom; where

relative pronoun

Strong's #834 BDB #81

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

ʿebâdîym (עְבָדִים) [pronounced ģeb-vaw-DEEM]

slaves, servants; workers; underlings; subjects; slavery, bondage, servitude; this can mean military men, soldiers in the plural

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #5650 BDB #713


Translation: ...for [there is] no pasture for the flocks which [belong] to your servants,... They explain the reason to him; there is no longer a place in Canaan where they can bring their flocks to grace. This suggests that there is very little rain resulting in very little vegetation growing on Canaan.


Genesis 47:4c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

for, that, because; when, at that time, which, what time

explanatory or temporal conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

kâbêd (כָבֵד) [pronounced kawb-VADE]

to honor, to glorify, to recognize; to be great, to be vehement, to be heavy, weighty, burdensome

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #3513 BDB #457

My e-sword in the KJV has the adjective/noun cognate instead.

râʿâb (רָעָב) [pronounced raw-ĢAWBV]

famine, hunger; scarcity of grain; used figuratively for a lack of God’s Word

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #7458 BDB #944

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Kenaʿan (כְּנַעַן) [pronounced keNAH-ģahn]

which possibly means merchant and is transliterated Canaan

masculine proper noun; territory; pausal form

Strong’s #3667 BDB #488


Translation: ...because the famine was great in the land of Canaan. The famine means, there is little that is growing in the land. Logically, this suggests that there is little rain falling so the crops and the grasses are not growing. Wherever they take their flocks and herds, they cannot find any land with the grasses that they need.


Now, the famine is all over, so what about Egypt? The difference in Egypt is probably twofold—Goshen may be near water, which means it would be near plant life. Secondly, Egypt has grain, so their cattle can feast upon the grain as well.


Genesis 47:4d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʿattâh (עַתָּה) [pronounced ģaht-TAWH]

now, at this time, already

adverb of time

Strong’s #6258 BDB #773

When followed by an imperative or an interrogative, we + the adverb ʿattâh mean and so, thus, things being so, therefore, now therefore, now then, in conclusion. Sometimes, the concept of time is lost when this combination is used to incite another.

yâshab (יָשַב) [pronounced yaw-SHAHBV]

to remain, to stay; to dwell, to live, to inhabit, to reside; to sit

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #3427 BDB #442

nâʾ (נָא) [pronounced naw]

now; please, I pray you, I respectfully implore (ask, or request of) you, I urge you

a primitive particle of incitement and entreaty

Strong's #4994 BDB #609

Nâʾ is used for a submissive and modest request. It is used to express a wish (Job 32:21: “Oh, that I may not respect any man’s person”); to incite or to urge (Jer. 5:24); it is depreciatory when affixed to the 2nd person with a particle of negation (do not, I implore you—see Gen. 33:10 19:18); with the it expresses a wish or request (Psalm 124 129:1 SOS 7:9), a challenge (Jer. 17:15), asking leave (Gen. 18:4), and depreciation with a negation (Gen. 18:32). In many of these examples, we would express this with the addition of the word let.

ʿebâdîym (עְבָדִים) [pronounced ģeb-vaw-DEEM]

slaves, servants; workers; underlings; subjects; slavery, bondage, servitude; this can mean military men, soldiers in the plural

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #5650 BDB #713

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Goshen (גֹּשֶן) [pronounced GOH-sheen]

 a drawing near; and is transliterated Goshen

proper noun/location

Strong’s #1657 BDB #177


Translation: Therefore, your servants would [like] to live in the land of Goshen.” This is the formal request, that they be allowed to live in the land of Goshen, which is a portion of Egypt.


Egypt had an immigration policy; even though Pharaoh had personally suggested to Joseph to bring his family to Egypt, there was still the formality of officially meeting the potential citizens and determining their part in the land of Egypt. Foreignors did not just arrive in a country and settle in wherever they felt like. Furthermore, a large group such as this could even pose a potential threat to the country's security so this meeting is proper immigartion procedure during those times. Jacob's family formally state their occupations, reveal their respect for the authority of the land, and formally state their requests for area of residency.


Genesis 47:4 And they said to Pharaoh, “For we have come to live in the land. For your servants have no pasture left for their flocks. For the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. And now please let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen.”


You will note that immigration has not changed much either. The brothers have come to a well-organized national entity; they are speaking to the head of that national entity; and they ask for permission to live there. This is the proper way to immigrate to another country. The land is a reference to Egypt.


The reason for their immigration is, they are no longer able to support their livestock in Canaan, due to the drought. At this point, we are two years into the drought.


——————————


I had some difficulty dividing this passage up. The first translation may show a break in a different place than the second.


And so says Pharaoh unto Joseph, to say, “Your father and your brothers have come unto you. A land of Egypt [is] to your faces she in a best of the land cause to dwell your father and your brothers. They will live in a land of Goshen and if you have known and there [is] in them men of strength and you have set them princes of cattle over which [are] to me.”

Genesis

47:5–6

Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying, “[I see that] your father and brothers have come to you [here in] the land of Egypt. It is before you; let your father and brothers live in the best of the land. They will live in the land of Goshen, and [just in case] you know that they are competent men [lit., if you know that in them, (they are) men of strength (and substance)], then place them over my men who are over the cattle [that I own].”

Pharaoh them spoke directly to Joseph, saying, “I am glad that your father and brothers and come to you here in Egypt. The land is before you; let your relatives live in the best of the land. Give them the choicest areas in Goshen. Also, if any of them are competent men, I would like to place them over the cattle which I own.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says Pharaoh unto Joseph, to say, “Your father and your brothers have come unto you. A land of Egypt [is] to your faces she in a best of the land cause to dwell your father and your brothers. They will live in a land of Goshen and if you have known and there [is] in them men of strength and you have set them princes of cattle over which [are] to me.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Pharoh spake to Joseph, saying, Thy father and thy brethren are come to thee; the land of Mizraim is before thee in the best of it let thy father and thy brethren dwell, (even) in the land of Goshen: and if thou know any of them to be men of ability, appoint them to be chiefs over my flocks.

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And Pharoh spake to Joseph, saying, Thy father and thy brethren have come to thee. The land of Mizraim is before thee. In the fairest part of the land make thy father and thy brethren to dwell: let them dwell in the land of Goshen. And if thou know any among them men of ability, appoint them masters over my flocks.

Revised Douay-Rheims         The king therefore said to Joseph: Thy father and thy brethren are come to thee. The land of Egypt is before thee: make them dwell in the best place, and give them the land of Gessen. And if thou knowest that there are industrious men among them, make them rulers over my cattle.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Pharaoh spoke to Yoseph, saying, "Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is before you. Make your father and your brothers dwell in the best of the land. Let them dwell in the land of Goshen. If you know any able men among them, then put them in charge of my livestock."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Pharaoh said to Joseph, Your father and your brothers have come to you; The land of Egypt is before you settle your father and your brothers in the best of the land; let them dwell in the land of Goshen; and if you know of any able men among them make them overseers over all my cattle.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Pharao spoke to Joseph, saying, Your father, and your brethren, are come to you. Behold, the land of Egypt is before you; settle your father and your brethren in the best land.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And Pharaoh said to Joseph, Let them have the land of Goshen; and if there are any able men among them, put them over my cattle. And Jacob and his sons came to Joseph in Egypt, and when word of it came to the ears of Pharaoh, king of Egypt, he said to Joseph, Your father and brothers have come to you; all the land of Egypt is before you; let your father and your brothers have the best of the land for their resting-place.

Easy English                          Pharaoh said to Joseph, ‘Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is here for them. Your fathers and brothers can stay in the best part of the land. They can live in Goshen. You may know some of them who are good at what they do. If you do, then they can keep my own animals safe.’

International Children’s B.     .

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  .

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

The Message                         Pharaoh looked at Joseph. “So, your father and brothers have arrived—a reunion! Egypt welcomes them. Settle your father and brothers on the choicest land—yes, give them Goshen. And if you know any among them that are especially good at their work, put them in charge of my own livestock.”

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Since your father and brothers have arrived, the land of Egypt is available to you. Settle your father and brothers in the land’s best location. Let them live in the land of Goshen. And if you know capable men among them, put them in charge of my own livestock.”

Contemporary English V.       The king said to Joseph, "It's good that your father and brothers have arrived. I will let them live anywhere they choose in the land of Egypt, but I suggest that they settle in Goshen, the best part of our land. I would also like for your finest shepherds to watch after my own sheep and goats."

The Living Bible                     And Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Choose anywhere you like for them to live. Give them the best land of Egypt. The land of Goshen will be fine. And if any of them are capable, put them in charge of my flocks, too.”

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Now that your father and brothers have joined you here, choose any place in the entire land of Egypt for them to live. Give them the best land of Egypt. Let them live in the region of Goshen. And if any of them have special skills, put them in charge of my livestock, too.”


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          So, that's how Jacob and his sons came to Egypt (to JoSeph). And when Pharaoh (the king of Egypt) heard about that, 5 he told JoSeph: '[Now that] your father and brothers have come to you, 6 {Look!} the whole land of Egypt is before you. Choose the best land as a place for your father and brothers to settle!'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Then Pharaoh replied to Joseph, “Now that your father and your brothers have come to you, Egypt [Lit. from the land of Egypt, and so throughout the chapter] is at your disposal [Lit. is before you], so settle your father and brothers in the best part of the land! Let them live in the Goshen territory. If you learn that any of them are especially skilled, put them in charge of my livestock.”

New Advent (Knox) Bible       .

Revised Knox Bible                So the king told Joseph, Now that your father and your brethren have come here to bear you company, the whole land of Egypt is at your disposal; bid them dwell where they are best able to dwell, occupying the country of Gessen. And if you know any of their number to be skilful at their craft, give them charge of my own herds.

Translation for Translators     The king said to Joseph, “I am happy that your father and your older brothers and younger brother have come to you. They can live wherever you want in the whole country of Egypt. Give your father and your brothers the best part of the land. They can live in Goshen. And if you know that any of them have any special ability to work with livestock, have them be in charge of my own livestock, too.”


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Pharaoh was to direct Joseph, to the intent: Your father and your brothers are to have come, and the solid grounds of the Egyptians are turned before them. On the best of the solid grounds was your father and brothers, to settle down a settling down. On the solid grounds of Goshen were they to settle down. Is you to have known, that there persists a man of ability, he is to have been set, as a leader over my livestock.

Conservapedia                       Pharaoh said to Joseph, "Your father and your brothers have come to you. The whole land of Egypt is before you. Have your father and brothers live in the best of the land; let them live in the land of Goshen. If you know any man of aptitude among them, appoint them as foremen over my cattle."

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                Pharoh therefore in reply said to Joseph, "Your father and your brothers have come to you ; the land of the Mitzeraim is before you, so fix your father and brothers on the best of it. Let them settle in the land of Goshen, and if you know also a skilful man amongst them, appoint him superintendent of my farms."

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And Pharao said unto Joseph: your father and your brethren are come unto you. The land of Egypt is open before you: In the best place of the land make both your father and your brethren dwell: And even in the land of Gosan let them dwell. Moreover if you know any men of activity among them, make them rulers over my cattle.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         And Pharaoh said to Joseph: Thy father and thy brethren have come to thee. The land of Egypt is at your disposal; settle thy father and thy brethren in the best part of the land; let them settle in the land of Goshen. And if thou knowest of competent men among them, appoint them to have charge of the stock which belong to me.

NIV, ©2011                             Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Your father and your brothers have come to you, and the land of Egypt is before you; settle your father and your brothers in the best part of the land. Let them live in Goshen. And if you know of any among them with special ability, put them in charge of my own livestock.”

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         And Pharaoh spoke to Joseph saying, your father and your brothers are come to you. The land of Egypt is before you so in the choicest parts of the land settle your father and brothers, to live in the land of Goshen. Let them remain there and if you know any men of ability among them, then make them rulers over my livestock.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And Pharaoh said to Joseph: "Your father and your brother came to you. The land of Egypt is before you--- settle your father and your brothers in the best of the land: they will be settled in the land of Goshen--- and if you know that they have soldiers, I will put them them as managers of the herds that I have.


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 And Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying, Your father and your brothers have come to you; The land of Egypt is before your face; let your father and brothers sit down in the best of the land; let them sit down in the land of Goshen; and if you know by seeing and there are men of resources among them, put them chief rulers over the livestock that is mine.

New American Bible (2002)   Pharaoh said to Joseph, "They may settle in the region of Goshen; and if you know any of them to be qualified, you may put them in charge of my own livestock." Thus, when Jacob and his sons came to Joseph in Egypt, and Pharaoh, king of Egypt, heard about it, Pharaoh said to Joseph, "Now that your father and brothers have come to you, the land of Egypt is at your disposal; settle your father and brothers in the pick of the land."

New American Bible (2011)   .

New Jerusalem Bible             Then Pharaoh said to Joseph,'They may stay in the region of Goshen, and if you know of any capable men among them, put them in charge of my own livestock.' Jacob and his sons went to Egypt where Joseph was. Pharaoh king of Egypt heard about this and said to Joseph, 'Your father and brothers have come to you. The country of Egypt is open to you: settle your father and brothers in the best region.'

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Pharaoh said to Yosef, “Your father and brothers have come to you, and the land of Egypt lies before you. Have your father and brothers live on the best property in the country — let them live in the land of Goshen. Moreover, if you know that some of them are particularly competent, put them in charge of my livestock.”

exeGeses companion Bible   And Paroh says to Yoseph, saying,

Your father and your brothers come to you:

the land of Misrayim is at your face;

settle your father and brothers in the best of the land

- settle them in the land of Goshen:

and if you know any men of valour among them,

set them governors over my chattel.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               .

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 Pharaoh said to Joseph, 'Your father and brothers have now come to you. The land of Egypt is at your disposal. Settle your father and brothers in the best area. Let them settle in the Goshen District. If you have capable men among them, you can appoint them as livestock officers over my [cattle].'

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Pharaoh spoke unto Yosef, saying, Avicha and acheicha are come unto thee;

Eretz Mitzrayim is before thee; in the best of the land make avicha and acheicha to dwell; in Eretz Goshen let them dwell; and if thou knowest any anshei chayil among them, then make them sarei mikneh (royal overseers of livestock) of mine.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Then ·the king [LPharaoh] said to Joseph, “Your father and your brothers have come to you, and ·you may choose any place in Egypt for them to live [Lthe land of Egypt is before you]. Give your father and your brothers the best land; let them live in the land of Goshen. And if any of them are skilled shepherds, put them in charge of my ·sheep and cattle [Llivestock].”

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And Pharaoh spake unto Joseph, saying, Thy father and thy brethren are come unto thee; the land of Egypt is before thee, in the best of the land make thy father and brethren to dwell; he might give them places to live in whatsoever part he considered most excellent for their purposes, in the land of Goshen let them dwell. It is a fine bit of tact on the part of Pharaoh in yielding to Joseph the right and the decision as to the settlement in Goshen. And if thou knowest any men of activity among them, able, energetic men, then make them rulers over my cattle, they were to be given positions as chief herdsmen.

NET Bible®                             Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is before you; settle your father and your brothers in the best region of the land. They may live in the land of Goshen. If you know of any highly capable men [Heb “men of skill.”] among them, put them in charge [Heb “make them rulers.”] of my livestock.”

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Pharaoh (to Joseph): Your father and brothers have come to you for help. You have the entire land of Egypt at your disposal. Settle your family in the best areas of the land. Let them live in Goshen, and if you know of any who are particularly good at what they do, then put them in charge of my livestock.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Paroh [Great house] said to Yoseph [Adding] saying, your father and your brothers came to you, the land of Mitsrayim [Troubles] is to your face, she is in the best of the land, your father and your brothers will surely settle in the land of Goshen [Draw near] and if you know and there is in them men of force then you will set them in place as nobles of livestock upon which belong to me,...

Concordant Literal Version    And speaking is Pharaoh to Joseph, saying, "Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt, before you is it. In the best of the land cause your father and your brothers to dwell. Dwelling are they in the land of Goshen. And should you, forsooth, know able mortals among them, then place them as chiefs over the cattle which are mine.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  And Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying, Thy father and thy brethren are come to thee. The land of Egypt is before thee; in the best of the land settle thy father and thy brethren: let them dwell in the land of Goshen. And if thou knowest men of activity among them, then set them as overseers of cattle over what I have.

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is before you. Settle your father and your brothers in the best of the land. Let them settle in the land of Goshen, and if you know any able men among them, put them in charge of my livestock.”

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Niobi Study Bible                   And speaking is Pharaoh to Joseph, saying, "Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt, before you is it. In the best of the land cause your father and your brothers to dwell. Dwelling are they in the land of Goshen. And should you, forsooth, know able mortals among them, then place them as chiefs over the cattle which are mine.

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is at your disposal; settle your father and your brothers in the best of the land, let them live in the land of Goshen; and if you know any capable men among them, then put them in charge of my livestock.”

New European Version          .

New King James Version       Then Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying, “Your father and your brothers have come to you. The land of Egypt is before you. Have your father and brothers dwell in the best of the land; let them dwell in the land of Goshen. And if you know any competent men among them, then make them chief herdsmen over my livestock.”

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Pharaoh speaks unto Joseph, saying, “Your father and your brothers have come unto you: the land of Egypt is before you; in the best of the land cause your father and your brothers to dwell—they dwell in the land of Goshen, and if you have known, and there are among them men of ability, then you have set them heads over the cattle I have.”

 

The gist of this passage:     Pharaoh gives the brothers of Joseph the choice of the land; but strongly suggests that they choose Goshen. He says if there are any men of ability that the should take on the responsibility of his livestock.


Genesis 47:5a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

Qal infinitive construct

Strong’s #559 BDB #55


Translation: Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying,... Pharaoh has been very happy that Joseph has come before him and has become his right-hand man.


What Pharaoh says may explain Joseph taking the time and telling his brothers what to say to Pharaoh.


Genesis 47:5b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʾâb (אָב) [pronounced awbv]

father, both as the head of a household, clan or tribe; ancestor, grandfather; founder, civil leader, military leader; master, teacher

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

3rd person plural, Qal perfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied) with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #413 BDB #39

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Mitserayim (מִצְרַיִם) [pronounced mits-RAH-yim]

double straights; transliterated Mizraim; also Egypt, Egyptians

masculine singular, proper noun

Strong’s #4714 BDB #595


Translation: ...“[I see that] your father and brothers have come to you [here in] the land of Egypt. Pharaoh appears to be making an obvious observation.


Genesis 47:5 And Pharaoh spoke to Joseph, saying, “Your father and your brothers have come to you.


Pharaoh had called for Joseph to bring his family into Egypt. In fact, he ordered Joseph to call for his family—so that there was no mistaking Pharaoh’s intentions.


At this point, Pharaoh is providing a summation of what has just occurred, along with his orders (which are an official acceptance of Joseph’s family into Egypt). He will assign to them a particular place to live as well.


Genesis 47:6a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

pânîym (פָּנִים) [pronounced paw-NEEM]

face, faces countenance; presence

masculine plural noun (plural acts like English singular); with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #6440 BDB #815

Together, they literally translate to, to your faces. However, they properly mean before you, before your face, in your presence, in your sight, in front of you. When used with God, it can take on the more figurative meaning in Your judgment.

hîyʾ (הִיא) [pronounced hee]

she, it; also used as a demonstrative pronoun: that, this (one)

3rd person feminine singular, personal pronoun; sometimes the verb is, is implied

Strong’s #1931 BDB #214


Translation: It is before you;... She here refers back to the land. Pharaoh is going to give Joseph carte blanc when it comes to the land. His family is going to be allowed to live anywhere that they want.


Genesis 47:6b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

mêyţâb (מֵיטָב) [pronounced may-TAWBv]

the good or best [of anything]

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #4315 BDB #405

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #776 BDB #75

yâshab (יָשַב) [pronounced yaw-SHAHBV]

cause to remain [stay, inhabit, sit, dwell]; make [a woman] to live [with someone]; cause [a land] to be inhabited

2nd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperative

Strong's #3427 BDB #442

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

ʾâb (אָב) [pronounced awbv]

father, both as the head of a household, clan or tribe; ancestor, grandfather; founder, civil leader, military leader; master, teacher

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26


Translation: ...let your father and brothers live in the best of the land. Pharaoh orders Joseph to cause his brothers to live in the best of the land.


Genesis 47:6c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

yâshab (יָשַב) [pronounced yaw-SHAHBV]

to remain, to stay; to dwell, to live, to inhabit, to reside; to sit

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #3427 BDB #442

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Goshen (גֹּשֶן) [pronounced GOH-sheen]

 a drawing near; and is transliterated Goshen

proper noun/location

Strong’s #1657 BDB #177


Translation: They will live in the land of Goshen,... There are two ways to look at this: (1) Pharaoh says, “Live wherever you want to live; (2) but wherever you choose, it will be in the land of Goshen. Or, Pharaoh tells them to live wherever they want; and he already knows that Joseph wants them to live in Goshen. I think the latter situation is the accurate understanding of it.


Genesis 47:6d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾîm (אִם) [pronounced eem]

if, though; lo, behold; oh that, if only; when, whenever; since, though when (or, if followed by a perfect tense which refers to a past event)

primarily an hypothetical particle

Strong's #518 BDB #49

The particle ʾîm (אִם) can be used as a demonstrative (lo, behold), an interrogative (usually expecting a negative response and often used with other particles and rhetorically), and as a conditional particle (if, though); an indication of a wish or desire (oh that, if only; this is a rare usage).

yâdaʿ (יָדַע) [pronounced yaw-DAHĢ]

to know, to perceive, to acquire knowledge, to become acquainted with, to know by experience, to have a knowledge of something; to see; to learn; to recognize [admit, acknowledge, confess]

2nd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #3045 BDB #393

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

yêsh (יֵש) [pronounced yaysh]

being, substance, existence; used as a substitute for to be (without reference to number or tense); there [is, are]; to be present, to be ready, to exist

substantive with a 3rd person masculine singular suffix; the verb to be may be implied

Strong’s #3426 BDB #441

The substantive yêsh often acts as a substantive plus the absolute status quo verb to be; e.g., [if] there be (1Sam. 20:8), there is (Esther 3:8), there shall be (Jer. 31:6). However, this acts not as a mere copula [pronounced KOP-ye-la], but existence is emphasized. In the KJV, the verbal portion of this is often italicized. The second word in the second line of Job 6:6 is the substantive of existence or being—or is there, or does there exist. We often render this there is, even though there is no verb.

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾănâshîym (אֲנָשִים) [pronounced uh-NAW-sheem]; also spelled ʾîyshîym (אִישִים) [pronounced ee-SHEEM]

men; inhabitants, citizens; companions; soldiers, followers

masculine plural noun

Strong's #376 BDB #35

chayil (חַיִל) [pronounced CHAH-yil]

army, force; strength, courage, power, might; efficiency; and that which is gotten through strength—wealth, substance

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #2428 BDB #298


Translation: ...and [just in case] you know that they are competent men [lit., if you know that in them, (they are) men of strength (and substance)],... This part is somewhat difficult to translate; and I think the idea here is, Pharaoh says, “Now, if any of your brothers are particularly competent (like you), I would like to make use of them.”


Now, it would make sense to Pharaoh that, if Joseph’s brothers were anything like him, he could certainly use some good managerial help.


Genesis 47:6e

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

sîym (שִׂים) [pronounced seem]; also spelled sûwm (שׂוּם) [pronounced soom]

to put, to place, to set; to make; to appoint

2nd person masculine singular, Qal perfect with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong's #7760 BDB #962

sar (שַׂר) [pronounced sar]

chieftain, chief, ruler, official, captain, prince, leader, commander

masculine plural construct

Strong’s #8269 BDB #978

James Rickard: “Princes” is the plural Noun SAR, שָׂר, that means, “prince, ruler, leader, chief, chieftain, official, captain or official” whether political, military or religious.

mîqeneh (מִקְנֶה) [pronounced mik-NEH]

cattle, livestock (specifically sheep, cows and goats); herds, flocks

masculine singular (collective) plural noun

Strong’s #4735 BDB #889

ʿal (עַל) [pronounced ģahl ]

upon, beyond, on, against, above, over, by, beside

preposition of proximity

Strong’s #5921 BDB #752

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced ash-ER]

that, which, when, who, whom; where

relative pronoun

Strong's #834 BDB #81

Literally, these translate to mean upon which, over which, over that. This combination of ʿal and ʾăsher mean because, because that, in that.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 1st person singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510


Translation: ...then place them over my men who are over the cattle [that I own].” Pharaoh apparently had a particular job opening.


Now, perhaps Joseph is thinking that he does not want his brothers to have positions of authority under Pharaoh.


Pharaoh is not a man of prejudice. He is too realistic for that. When in high school (as a student and not as a teacher), I had certain prejudices against all kinds of people; I had a very narrow social circle that I approved of and a lot of groups that I thought very little of, in my narrow way of thinking. However, when I began teaching, I found that there were all different kinds of kids, all different kinds of groups, and found that it would be quite counter-productive to hold any prejudices toward my young people. Although there is a widespread prejudice against those who shepherd livestock, Pharaoh recognizes their ability in this field and would entrust his own herds with these men.


Genesis 47:6 The land of Egypt is before you. Make your father and brothers to live in the best of the land; in the land of Goshen let them live. And if you know men of ability among them, then make them overseers of livestock, over what is mine.”


Even though the Egyptians may not have appreciated close proximity to shepherds and livestock, it was still a necessity. The Pharaoh had his own livestock; and he was putting Jacob’s family in charge of it.


My take is, this is a privilege yet also a serious responsibility which the brothers are to assume, as guests of the Pharaoh in his land. Based upon what I have read, this would be considered one of those dirty jobs that you give over to immigrants (jobs that Egyptians won’t do). This is not slave labor, however; as this is the lifelong occupation of Joseph’s brothers.


The Pharaoh is not much different from most people today. Most of us love a good steak; but we are less than fond of the smell of animals being raised for food. The smell of a steak on the barbeque is one of the greatest smells in the world; the smell of a ranch—well, some people can appreciate that, but most cannot.


Some dynasties of Egyptians tend to be extremely clean; and people who work farms and keep animals tend not to be (in their eyes). It is possible that Pharaoh had been looking to move his livestock elsewhere; and this affords him the perfect way to do that.


There appears to be a real emphasis on the place called Goshen. I would guess that it is somehow isolated from the rest of Egypt—perhaps by some natural barriers.


What we do know about Goshen.

Goshen and the Hebrews

1.      The land of Goshen was fairly close to where Joseph lived, so that he could keep in close contact with his family. Gen. 45:10 46:28

2.      When the sons of Jacob first came to Egypt, they must have come into the land by Goshen or entered in close to Goshen, as their primary dealings were with Joseph. Gen. 42–43

3.      When they entered Egypt, they waited in Goshen for Pharaoh to tell them where to live. Gen. 47:2

4.      Goshen is where Joseph wanted his family to live. Gen. 46:34

5.      The family of Jacob temporarily stayed in Goshen when they first arrived, but were then permanently assigned to that area by Pharaoh. Gen. 47:1–6

6.      Goshen turned out to be an ideal area for the family of Jacob; they greatly prospered there. Gen. 47:27

7.      By the time of the Exodus, it is likely that some Egyptians lived in this area as well. Exodus 3:22 11:2 12:35–36

8.      God isolated the sons of Jacob from some of the plagues of Egypt. Whether this was done by supernatural means or simply because of the isolation of Goshen, we do not know. Ex. 8:22 9:26

9.      While living in Goshen, the children of Israel grew to a population of 2 million in the space of about 400 years. This is not a miraculous amount of growth; but it is a very healthy growth rate—particularly for people who were enslaved.

10.    Goshen is also called the land of Rameses in Gen. 47:11 Ex. 12:37.

11.    Once the sons of Israel leave Egypt, Goshen will never be mentioned again (the name is found in Joshua, but it refers to a different place).

12.    Commentators are still discussing today exactly where Goshen is in Egypt. Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature spent 4 full pages on this topic alone. Few commentators gave it this much discussion.

13.    Fausset: Joseph naturally placed his family on the border land between Egypt and Palestine, the promised land, and at the same time near himself at Tunis or else Memphis the capital of Egypt.1

genesis47.gif

14.    ISBE: The region thus very clearly indicated was not of any great extent, having an area of only about 900 square miles, including two very different districts. The western half, immediately East of the Bubastic branch of the Nile, stretches from Zoan to Bubastis (at both of which cities records of the Hyksos ruler Apepi have been found), or a distance of about 35 miles North and South. This region is an irrigated plain which is still considered to include some of the best land in Egypt. The description of the land of Rameses (see RAAMSES), in the 14th century b.c., shows its fertility; and Silvia says that the land of Goshen was 16 miles from Heroöpolis, and that she traveled for two days in it “through vineyards, and balsam plantations, and orchards, and tilled fields, and gardens.” 2 ISBE makes the assumption that they knew exactly where Goshen is; the Cyclopedia referenced above spends more than 3 pages discussing the various places where Goshen might have been located.


Map of Goshen in Egypt from News You Can Believe; accessed September 19, 2017. Some maps places Goshen further south. This location seems logical, as the sons of Jacob would have traveled through this general area in order to buy grain, encountering their brother Joseph there. If you are thinking ahead to the Exodus, and the Jews crossing over the Sea of Reeds, it is possible that leg of the Red Sea came further up.

As an addendum to the location of Goshen, there have been recent archeological discoveries in Egypt, in the location noted on the map above. Avaris is the name given to this city/area where they believe evidence of a Semitic city has been found.

genesis471.gif

Map of Avaris is from Patterns of Evidence; accessed September 19, 2017.


From Patterns of Evidence: When speaking about Avaris, Professor John Bimson from Trinity University in Bristol, England mentioned that many other Semitic sites from the Middle Bronze Age also exist in the area nearby. Bimson noted that, “If we go back to the 18th-19th centuries BC, we’ve got settlements of Semitic groups, or what the Egyptians called Asiatics. We don’t know exactly when they started arriving or exactly when these settlements stopped, because many of these sites have not been fully excavated yet. You’ve got a good many settlements, twenty or more, which would fit the land of Goshen where the Bible says the Israelites were settled.3


One certainly needs to be careful about touting the latest archeological discovery, as it does not always turn out the way that we expect it to. Nevertheless, this is a set of promising discoveries.

1Andrew Robert Fausset, Fausset’s Bible Dictionary; from e-Sword, topic: Goshen.

2 The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia; James Orr, Editor; ©1956 Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; Ⓟ by Hendrickson Publishers; from E-Sword; Topic:  Goshen.

http://patternsofevidence.com/blog/2016/06/02/new-archeological-discoveries-about-to-hit-overdrive/ accessed September 19, 2017.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————



Joseph has brought his brothers in to speak to Pharaoh; and now he brings in his father to speak with him.


And so brings Joseph Jacob his father and so he has him stand to faces of Pharaoh. And so blesses Jacob Pharaoh.

Genesis

47:7

Joseph brought his father Jacob and placed him before Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Joseph brought his father Jacob before Pharaoh and Jacob blessed Pharaoh.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so brings Joseph Jacob his father and so he has him stand to faces of Pharaoh. And so blesses Jacob Pharaoh.

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Joseph brought Jakob his father, and presented him before Pharoh: and Jakob blessed Pharoh.

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And Joseph brought Jakob his father, and presented him before Pharoh. And Jakob blessed Pharoh, and said, May it please the Almighty that the waters of Nilos may be replenished, and may the famine pass away from the world in thy days!

Revised Douay-Rheims         After this Joseph brought in his father to the king, and presented him before him: and he blessed him.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Yoseph brought in Ya'aqub, his father, and set him before Pharaoh, and Ya'aqub blessed Pharaoh.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Joseph brought in Jacob his father and presented him to Pharaoh and Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Joseph brought in Jacob his father, and set him before Pharao; and Jacob blessed Pharao.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             Then Joseph made his father Jacob come before Pharaoh, and Jacob gave him his blessing.

Easy English                          .

International Children’s B.     .

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  Then Joseph called his father Jacob to come in to meet Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

God’s Word                         Then Joseph brought his father Jacob and had him stand in front of Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

The Message                         .

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      Then Joseph brought his father Jacob in to meet Pharaoh. Jacob gave Pharaoh his blessing.

New Simplified Bible              Joseph brought his father Jacob and presented him to the king. Jacob gave the king his blessing.


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           .

Contemporary English V.       .

The Living Bible                     .

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             Then Joseph brought in his father Jacob and introduced him to the king, and Jacob blessed the king.

New Life Version                    Then Joseph brought his father Jacob to Pharaoh. Jacob prayed that good would come to Pharaoh.

New Living Translation           .


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Thereafter, JoSeph brought his father Jacob in and stood him before Pharaoh, and Jacob blest Pharaoh.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Later, Joseph brought his father Jacob to Pharaoh and introduced him. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

New Advent (Knox) Bible       Afterwards, Joseph brought his father in, and presented him to the king, to whom he gave his blessing.

Revised Knox Bible                .

Translation for Translators     Then Joseph brought his father Jacob into the palace and introduced him to the king. Jacob asked God to bless the king.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Joseph was to bring in Jacob, his father, and was to stand him turned before Pharaoh, and Jacob was to compliment Pharaoh.

Conservapedia                       .

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                Joseph afterwards took Jacob his father and presented him before Pharoh, and Jacob blessed Pharoh ; and Pharoh asked Jacob, " How many are the days of the years of your life ? " v. 8 is included for context.

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And Joseph brought in Jacob his father and set him before Pharao. And Jacob blessed Pharao.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         .

Wikipedia Bible Project          .


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  The sons of Jacob in Egypt

Joseph brought in Jacob his father and presented him to Pharaoh who then asked him, “How old are you?” Gen 47,28 Job 14,1 Ps 90,9 Eph 5,16 V. 8 is included for context.

The Heritage Bible                 .

New American Bible (2011)   .

New Jerusalem Bible             Joseph brought his father and presented him to Pharaoh. Jacob paid his respects to Pharaoh.

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           .

exeGeses companion Bible   And Yoseph enters Yaaqov his father

and stands him at the face of Paroh:

and Yaaqov blesses Paroh.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               Joseph then brought his father Jacob and presented him to Pharaoh; and Jacob greeted Pharaoh.

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 Joseph brought his father Jacob and presented him to Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Yosef brought in Ya’akov aviv, and set him before Pharaoh; and Ya’akov made on Pharaoh a brocha.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Then Joseph brought in his father Jacob and ·introduced him to the king [Lhe stood before Pharaoh], and Jacob blessed ·the king [LPharaoh].

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And Joseph brought in Jacob, his father, after the first part of the audience had terminated so successfully, and set him before Pharaoh, presented him to the king; and Jacob blessed Pharaoh. It was not an ordinary, humble greeting, but a true priestly blessing.

NET Bible®                             Then Joseph brought in his father Jacob and presented him [Heb “caused him to stand.”] before Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Then Joseph brought his father, Jacob, and presented him to Pharaoh, and Jacob gave Pharaoh a blessing.

Jacob blesses Pharaoh. As we have seen, words spoken as a blessing have great meaning at this time. It may be no more than a greeting spoken, such as “shalom,” which means “peace.” However the story of Genesis prompts us to consider another possibility. In God’s plan to redeem and reclaim His creation, He chooses Abraham and his descendants to be a blessing to all the families on earth. Jacob, Abraham’s grandson and God’s covenant partner, speaks a blessing over Pharaoh that creates a new reality for Egypt and its king. Little does Pharaoh know that this humble nomadic family in need of his help will one day change the course of history.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Yoseph [Adding] brought Ya'aqov [He restrains] his father and he stood him to the face of Paroh [Great house] and Ya'aqov [He restrains] respected Paroh [Great house],...

Concordant Literal Version    And bringing is Joseph Jacob, his father, and is standing him before Pharaoh. And Jacob is blessing Pharaoh.

Context Group Version          And Joseph brought in Jacob his father, and set him before Pharaoh: and Jacob esteemed Pharaoh.

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  So Joseph brought in Jacob his father, and caused him to stand before Pharaoh,—and Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

English Standard Version      Then Joseph brought in Jacob his father and stood him before Pharaoh, and Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    And Joseph brought in his father Jacob and placed him before Pharaoh. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         Then Joseph brought in Jacob his father and presented him to Pharaoh, and Jacob blessed Pharaoh.

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          .

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Joseph brings in Jacob his father, and causes him to stand before Pharaoh; and Jacob blesses Pharaoh.

 

The gist of this passage: 


Genesis 47:7a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to take in, to bring [near, against, upon], to come in with, to carry, to cause to come [in], to gather, to bring to pass

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

Yaʿăqôb (יַעֲקֹב) [pronounced yah-ģuh-KOHBV]

supplanter; insidious, deceitful; to circumvent; heel; and is transliterated Jacob

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #3290 BDB #784

ʾâb (אָב) [pronounced awbv]

father, both as the head of a household, clan or tribe; ancestor, grandfather; founder, civil leader, military leader; master, teacher

masculine singular noun with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3


Translation: Joseph brought his father Jacob... Of particular importance to Joseph, Jacob and Pharaoh is bringing Jacob before Pharaoh.


Genesis 47:7b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʿâmad (עָמַד) [pronounced ģaw-MAHD]

to cause to stand [firm], to maintain; to station, to cause to set up [place, raise up, erect], to establish, to preserve; to decree, to impose [a law, mandate]; to ordain, to appoint, to destine; to stand still; to present [one] before [a king]

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #5975 BDB #763

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

pânîym (פָּנִים) [pronounced paw-NEEM]

face, faces, countenance; presence

masculine plural construct (plural acts like English singular)

Strong’s #6440 BDB #815

Together, they mean upon the face of, before, before the face of, in the presence of, in the sight of, in front of. When used with God, it can take on the more figurative meaning in the judgment of. This can also mean forwards; the front part [or, the edge of a sword]. Lepânîym (לְפָּנִים) can take on a temporal sense as well: before, of old, formerly, in the past, in past times. Literally, this means to faces of.

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829


Translation: ...and placed him before Pharaoh. Joseph places his father Jacob before Pharaoh.


These two men standing before each other—Jacob, who, although he is a wealthy businessman, lacks the great earthly power of Pharaoh; and Pharaoh, a man of great power (one of the most powerful men in the world at this time) and great wisdom.


In eternity future, we will meet both of these men, and perhaps find out exactly what Pharaoh’s name was.


Genesis 47:7c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

bârake (בָּרַ) [pronounced baw-RAHKe]

to invoke God, to praise, to celebrate, to adore, to bless [God]; to bless [men], to invoke blessings; to bless [as God, man and other created things], therefore to cause to prosper, to make happy; to salute anyone [with a blessing]; to curse

3rd person masculine singular, Piel imperfect

Strong’s #1288 BDB #138

Yaʿăqôb (יַעֲקֹב) [pronounced yah-ģuh-KOHBV]

supplanter; insidious, deceitful; to circumvent; heel; and is transliterated Jacob

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #3290 BDB #784

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829


Translation: Jacob blessed Pharaoh. Jacob blesses Pharaoh.

 

The NET Bible: The precise meaning of the Hebrew verb translated “blessed” is difficult in this passage, because the content of Jacob’s blessing is not given. The expression could simply mean that he greeted Pharaoh, but that seems insufficient in this setting. Jacob probably praised Pharaoh, for the verb is used this way for praising God. It is also possible that he pronounced a formal prayer of blessing, asking God to reward Pharaoh for his kindness.


We have here the Piel imperfect 3rd masculine singular of bârake (בָּרַ) [pronounced baw-RAK]. The verb means to kneel but by implication, it means to bless; when it is God blessing man, benefits are implied; when it is man blessing God, respect and celebration are key. According to Strong's it can also be used euphemistically to curse God or a king. The word often was used in greeting or in parting. We find this word used over 400 times in the Old Testament. [See the doctrine of blessing--in progress!] In blessing Pharaoh, Jacob is asking that God provide spiritual and material prosperity for Pharaoh. This is a matter of respect and polite behavior and its strength varies by the person giving the blessing.

  

Pharaoh has no idea that his providing a place for this small family is going to give great blessing to all Egypt and to change human history.


Genesis 47:7 And Joseph brought in Jacob his father, and set him before Pharaoh. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh.


Jacob would have blessed Pharaoh in the name of the Revealed God; the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.


——————————



And so says Pharaoh unto Jacob, “As how [many] days of years of your lives?”

Genesis

47:8

Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How many days of years [have] you lived?”

Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How old are you now?”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says Pharaoh unto Jacob, “As how [many] days of years of your lives?”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Pharoh said to Jakob, How many are the days of the years of thy life?

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And Pharoh said to Jakob, How many are the days of the years of thy life?

Revised Douay-Rheims         And being asked by him: How many are the days of the years of thy life?

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Pharaoh said to Ya'aqub, "How many are the days of the years of your life?"

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Pharaoh said to Jacob, How old are you?

Septuagint (Greek)                And Pharao said to Jacob, How many are the years of the days of your life?

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             .

Easy English                          Then Pharaoh asked Jacob, ‘How old are you?’

International Children’s B.     .

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  .

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         Jacob gave the king his blessing, and the king asked him, “How old are you?” A portion of v. 7 is included for context.

The Message                         .

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Joseph brought his father Jacob and gave him an audience with Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How old are you?” V. 7 is included for context.

Contemporary English V.       Then Joseph brought his father Jacob and introduced him to the king. Jacob gave the king his blessing, and the king asked him, "How old are you?" V. 7 is included for context.

The Living Bible                     .

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           “How old are you?” Pharaoh asked him.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          .

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        “How old are you?” [Lit. How many years have you lived?] Pharaoh asked Jacob.

New Advent (Knox) Bible       .

Revised Knox Bible                And when the king asked him, what was his age?

Translation for Translators     .


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Pharaoh was to say, to Jacob: For how long is you to be alive, even the days of your years?

Conservapedia                       Pharaoh said to Jacob, "How old are you?" Or literally, "What are the days of the years of your lives?"

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                .

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           .

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         .

NIV, ©2011                             After Jacob blessed Pharaoh, Pharaoh asked him, “How old are you?” A portion of v. 7 is included for context.

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         .

Wikipedia Bible Project          .


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 And Pharaoh said to Jacob, How many are the days of your years?

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2002)   Then Joseph brought his father Jacob and presented him to Pharaoh. After Jacob had paid his respects to Pharaoh, Pharaoh asked him, "How many years have you lived?" V. 7 is included for context.

New American Bible (2011)   .

New Jerusalem Bible             .

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            Then Joseph brought his father in and presented him to Pharaoh. Jacob blessed Pharaoh, who asked him his age, and he answered, “The years of my life on earth are one hundred and thirty; few and hard have they been -- fewer than the years my fathers lived.” Jacob then blessed Pharaoh and withdrew from his presence. Vv. 7, 9–10 are included for context.


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           .

exeGeses companion Bible   And Paroh says to Yaaqov,

How many are the days of the years of your life?

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               .

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 'How old are you?' asked Pharaoh of Jacob.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Pharaoh said unto Ya’akov, How old art thou?

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Then ·the king [LPharaoh] said to Jacob, “How ·old are you [Lmany of the days are the years of your life]?”

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And Pharaoh said unto Jacob, How old art thou? an inquiry of courtesy.

NET Bible®                             Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How long have you lived [Heb “How many are the days of the years of your life?”]?”

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Pharaoh (to Jacob): How old are you now?


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Paroh [Great house] said to Ya'aqov [He restrains], how many are the days of the years of your life,...

Concordant Literal Version    And saying is Pharaoh to Jacob, "How have been the days of the years of your life?

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      And Pharaoh said to Jacob, "How many are the days of the years of your life?"

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How many years have you lived?”

New European Version          Pharaoh said to Jacob, How many are the days of the years of your life?

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How old are you?”

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Pharaoh says unto Jacob, “How many are the days of the years of your life?”

 

The gist of this passage:     Pharaoh inquires as to Jacob’s age.


Genesis 47:8

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

pareʿôh (פַּרְעֹה) [pronounced pahre-ĢOH]

great house; possibly hair head (indicating one of great age and therefore with wisdom and authority); transliterated pharaoh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #6547 BDB #829

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

Yaʿăqôb (יַעֲקֹב) [pronounced yah-ģuh-KOHBV]

supplanter; insidious, deceitful; to circumvent; heel; and is transliterated Jacob

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #3290 BDB #784

kaph or ke (כְּ) [pronounced ke]

like, as, just as; according to, after; about, approximately

preposition of comparison, resemblance or approximation

No Strong’s # BDB #453

mâh (מָה) [pronounced maw]

what, how, why

interrogative; exclamatory particle

Strong’s #4100 BDB #552

The word kammâh (כַּמָּה) [pronounced kahm-maw], which means how often, how many, how much, how long. It is actually a preposition, an interrogative and the definite article strung together.

yâmîym (יָמִים) [pronounced yaw-MEEM]

days, a set of days; time of life, lifetime; a specific time period, a year

masculine plural construct

Strong’s #3117 BDB #398

shânîym (שָנִים) [pronounced shaw-NEEM]

years

feminine plural construct

Strong’s #8141 BDB #1040

chayyîym (חַיִּים) [pronounced khay-YEEM]

life, lives; a life of long duration, immortality; living, sustenance; refreshment; prosperity, welfare, happiness

masculine plural adjective with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #2416 BDB #311

The phrase days of years of your life is called a pleonasm [pronounced PLAY-oh-nasm] or a redundancy. There appears to be a redundancy of words, but there is not, as this is Scripture. In this case, perhaps the idea is his full and complete life, but he is not ready to live out this life in the palace with David.

These words together mean, how many years have you lived?

More or less from Keil and Delitzsch: How many days are there of the years of your life = how long have you lived.


Translation: Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How many days of years [have] you lived?” Again, note how little has changed in the conversations of men. In our culture, where youthfulness is often celebrated and envied, we continually ask very young people their age. In that culture, the wisdom of age was celebrated; so it was normal to ask an older person, “How old are you?”


The Pharaoh is making polite conversation, not knowing many people who command the respect that Jacob does and being the age that he is.


It would be difficult to speculate as to the age of Pharaoh, based upon him asking this question.


Genesis 47:8 And Pharaoh said to Jacob, “How many are the days of the years of your life?”


This question would suggest that Pharaoh is considerably younger than Jacob, but that he respects his age.


A less common question today, posed to those who are older, is, how old are you? In our culture, which worships youth (something which is driven, in part, by Hollywood and the media), this is seen as an impolite question. However, in the orient, a person is valued for their age and wisdom. Their time on earth counts for something and it was honored in ancient times. They have seen a lot, and they have experienced a lot. They can make recommendations and observations based upon all that they have observed over a long period of time. Such a person is less affected by cultural trends and today by technical innovations. They have observed and noted truths which have stood for the ages—truths which are unaffected by cultural shifts, the introduction of new cultures, or technological improvements.


For example, Solomon, King David’s son, went somewhat awry during his life, marrying 700 women and taking another 300 as concubines (mistresses). But, at the end of his life, he did a lot of writing, and sometimes his wisdom came from a place of failure. Solomon wrote, in Eccles. 9:9 Enjoy life with the wife whom you love, all the days of your vain life that He has given you under the sun, because that is your portion in life and in your toil at which you toil under the sun. My point being is, Solomon was very confused about this particular topic as a young and middle aged man, as he allowed himself to be subject to his desires. However, as he grew older, he became wiser about life and about the choices he had made. Prov. 5:18 Let your fountain be blessed, and rejoice in the wife of your youth,... (ESV; capitalized) My point being, with age, Solomon acquired some wisdom and common sense which he apparently had set aside for much of his life.


Genesis 47:9 And Jacob said to Pharaoh, “The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, and I have not attained to the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage.”


This is one of the markers of the life of Jacob—he is 130 years old when he comes to Egypt with his family. Recall that he left Canaan around age 77; returned some 20 years later, and therefore has continued to live in the land for 33 years after returning from Paddan-aram.


Jacob’s father Isaac lived to the age of 180; his grandfather, Abraham, lived to the age of 175. So, by comparison, Jacob was still a kid. He says that his days are few, indicating that he has lived considerably fewer years than his fathers; and he calls his life evil. However, remember that we have studied Jacob’s life, and we know that most of his problems were self-induced (which is true of most people—we often tend to be our own worst enemy). It is certainly a truism that, for the most part, a person is his own worst enemy. He does not appear to have come to that point in his understanding of himself and the world.


The Jews were taken out of the land of Canaan for several reasons. Most importantly, the Canaanites were becoming more and more degenerate; and, as we have studied, were having a negative impact upon the sons of Jacob. This degeneration would continue for some time (the next 400 years), to a point where, God will have the Jews return to the land and destroy those who live in the Land of Promise. However, there is a separation which must take place in order to protect the Hebrew family from cultural corruption. The Hebrews have to be made separate from the heathen living in Canaan.


Also, the Jews will be segregated, to some degree, from the Egyptians—due in part, I believe, to their vocation of cattle and animal raising. The divine purpose of the separation is to keep the sons of Israel racially pure. However, given the warm relations which begin between the Egyptians and Jacob’s family, there must have been more Egyptian women who entered into the family of Jacob.


Interestingly enough, there is only one thing that Jacob says to Pharaoh which is recorded in Scripture:


——————————


I took many liberties in the 2nd translation; far more than I normally do.


And so says Jacob unto Pharaoh, “Days of years of my travels thirty and a hundred of a year; few and evils were days of years of my lives and they have not attained to days of years lives of my fathers in days of years of their travels.” And so blesses Jacob Pharaoh and so goes out from faces of Pharaoh.

Genesis

47:9–10

Jacob said to Pharaoh, “[So far] the days of the years of my travels [are] 130 years and the days of my life have been fewer [than my fathers] and [more] evil [than my fathers]. And [to this point, my life] has not attained to the age of my fathers in the years of their travels.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and went out from his [lit., Pharaoh’s] presence.

Jacob then explained to Pharaoh, “So far, I have only lived for 130 years, so far fewer years than my fathers and I have endured more difficulties than my fathers. I have not attained to the age or greatness of my fathers in their lifetime travels.” Then Jacob blessed the Pharaoh and went out from his presence.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says Jacob unto Pharaoh, “Days of years of my travels thirty and a hundred of a year; few and evils were days of years of my lives and they have not attained to days of years lives of my fathers in days of years of their travels.” And so blesses Jacob Pharaoh and so goes out from faces of Pharaoh.

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Jakob said to Pharoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, and I have not attained to the days of the years of the life of my fathers, in the days of their pilgrimage. And Jakob blessed Pharoh, and went out from before Pharoh. And Joseph made his father and his brethren to dwell, and gave them a possession in the land of Mizraim, in the best of the land, in the land of Ramesis, as Pharoh had commanded.

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And Jakob answered Pharoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage are an hundred and thirty years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life; for in my youth I fled before Esau my brother, and sojourned in a land not my own; and now in the time of my old age have I come down to sojourn here. And my days have not reached the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage. And Jakob blessed Pharoh, and went out from before Pharoh.

Revised Douay-Rheims         He answered: The days of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years, few, and evil, and they are not come up to the days of the pilgrimage of my fathers.

And blessing the king, he went out.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Ya'aqub said to Pharaoh, "The days of the years of my pilgrimage are one hundred thirty years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, and they have not attained to the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage." Ya'aqub blessed Pharaoh, and went out from the presence of Pharaoh.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Jacob said to Pharaoh. The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years; few and difficult have been the years o my life. and I have not attained to the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh and went out from before Pharaoh.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Jacob said to Pharao, The days of the years of my life, wherein I sojourn, are a hundred and thirty years; few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, they have not attained to the days of the life of my fathers, in which days they sojourned. And Jacob blessed Pharao, and departed from him.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And Jacob said, The years of my wanderings have been a hundred and thirty; small in number and full of sorrow have been the years of my life, and less than the years of the wanderings of my fathers. And Jacob gave Pharaoh his blessing, and went out from before him.

Easy English                          Jacob replied, ‘I have been alive for 130 years. My years have been few, and difficult. And I am not as old as my ancestors were.’

Abraham was alive for 175 years (25:7). And Isaac was alive for 180 years (35:28).

Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left him.

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  Jacob said to Pharaoh, “I have had a short life with many troubles. I am only 130 years old. My father and his ancestors lived to be much older than I am.”

Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left from his meeting with him.

God’s Word                         Jacob answered Pharaoh, “The length of my stay on earth has been 130 years. The years of my life have been few and difficult, fewer than my ancestors’ years.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left.

Good News Bible (TEV)         Jacob answered, “My life of wandering has lasted a hundred and thirty years. Those years have been few and difficult, unlike the long years of my ancestors in their wanderings.” Jacob gave the king a farewell blessing and left.

International Children’s B.     Jacob said to him, “My life has been spent wandering from place to place. It has been short, filled with trouble. I have lived only 130 years. My ancestors lived much longer than I.” Then Jacob blessed the king and left.

The Message                         Jacob answered Pharaoh, “The years of my sojourning are 130—a short and hard life and not nearly as long as my ancestors were given.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left.

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      Jacob said to Pharaoh, “The years of my journey through life are 130. My years have been few and hard. They aren’t as many as the years of my father and grandfather before me.” Jacob gave Pharaoh his blessing. Then he left him.

New Simplified Bible              Jacob answered: »My life of wandering has lasted a hundred and thirty years. Those years have been few and difficult, unlike the long years of my ancestors in their wanderings.« Jacob gave the king a farewell blessing and left.


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Jacob said to Pharaoh, “I’ve been a traveler for 130 years. My years have been few and difficult. They don’t come close to the years my ancestors lived during their travels.” Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left Pharaoh’s presence.

Contemporary English V.       Jacob answered, "I have lived only a hundred thirty years, and I have had to move from place to place. My parents and my grandparents also had to move from place to place. But they lived much longer, and their life was not as hard as mine." Then Jacob gave the king his blessing once again and left.

The Living Bible                     Jacob replied, “I have lived 130 long, hard years, and I am not nearly as old as many of my ancestors.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh again before he left.

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             Jacob said to him, “My life has been spent wandering from place to place. It has been short and filled with trouble—only one hundred thirty years. My ancestors lived much longer than I.” Then Jacob blessed the king and left.

New Life Version                    Jacob answered Pharaoh, "I have traveled on this earth for 130 years. The years of my life have been few and full of sorrow, and less than the years that my fathers lived." Then Jacob prayed that good would come to Pharaoh, and went away from him.

New Living Translation           Jacob replied, “I have traveled this earth for 130 hard years. But my life has been short compared to the lives of my ancestors.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh again before leaving his court.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And Jacob replied to Pharaoh: 'The years of my life that I've lived are a hundred and thirty. But these years have been too few and too troubled. I haven't reached the age that my ancestors [achieved], back in the days when they lived.'

And Jacob [again] blest Pharaoh, and left.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        “I’m 130 years old,” Jacob replied. “My years have turned out to be few and unpleasant, but I haven’t yet reached the age my ancestors did during their travels on earth.” [The Heb. lacks on earth] Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and then left the throne room [Lit. left his presence].

New Advent (Knox) Bible       I have lived a wanderer’s life, said he, these hundred and thirty years; no long life, and no happy one, compared with the years my fathers spent, roaming the world before me. So he gave the king his blessing, and left him.

Revised Knox Bible                .

Translation for Translators     Jacob replied, “I have been traveling around for 130 years. I have not lived as long as my ancestors, but my life has been full of troubles.” Then Jacob again asked God to bless the king, and left him.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Jacob was to say to Pharaoh: The days of my years of my sojourning, are to be a hundred and thirty years. Few and in misery are the days of my years, that I am to be alive. Am I to have attain the days of years of the life of my fathers, in the days of their sojourning? Jacob was to compliment Pharaoh, and was to go out, from being turned before Pharaoh.

Conservapedia                       Jacob said to Pharaoh, "I am 130 years old. My life has been short [True enough. Abraham lived to be 175, and Isaac 180. Their ancestors lived even longer, although after the Great Flood, the lifespan of man fell ninety percent, and in a hurry.] and bitter, and not nearly as long as the lives of my ancestors." Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went out from Pharaoh's court.

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                When Jacob replied to Pharoh ; "The days of the years of my stay have been one hundred and thirty years. Few and evil have been the years of the days of my life! and they have not reached to the days of the years my fathers lived in the days io of their stay." Then Jacob blessed Pharoh, and retired from the presence of Pharoh.

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           .

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         And Jacob said to Pharaoh: The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years; few and evil have been the days of the years of my life and they have not reached the days of the years of the lives of my forefathers in the days of their pilgrimage. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh and went forth from Pharaoh’s presence.

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                Jacob said to Pharaoh, “The days of the years of my sojourn are 130 years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life. Moreover, the days of the years of my life have not attained the days of the years of the lives of my fathers, in the days of their sojourn.”

And Jacob blessed Pharaoh and went out from Pharaoh’s presence.

Urim-Thummim Version         Then Jacob answered Pharaoh, the years of my lifetime are 130 years: few and difficult (have the days and years of my life been), but have not been as long as the days of my forefathers, in the span of their lifetimes. Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and went out from before him.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And Jacob said to Pharaoh, "The days of my wandering amount to one-hundred and thirty years: meager and bad have been the days of my life. They did not approach the days of my fathers, in the days of their wandering." And Jacob blessed Pharaoh; and left Pharaoh's presence.


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  Jacob replied, “The years of my wanderings are one hundred and thirty. Brief and difficult have been the years of my life, and not as many as those of my fathers.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh and withdrew from his presence.

The Heritage Bible                 And Jacob said to Pharaoh, The days of the years of my temporary residence are one hundred and thirty years; the days of the years of my life have been few and evil, and have not reached the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their temporary residence. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went out from the face of Pharaoh.

New American Bible (2002)   Jacob replied: "The years I have lived as a wayfarer amount to a hundred and thirty. Few and hard have been these years of my life, and they do not compare with the years that my ancestors lived as wayfarers [man is merely a sojourner on earth; cf ⇒ Psalm 39:13.]." Then Jacob bade Pharaoh farewell and withdrew from his presence.

New Jerusalem Bible             Jacob said to Pharaoh, 'The years of my stay on earth add up to one hundred and thirty years. Few and unhappy my years have been, falling short of my ancestors' years in their stay on earth.' Jacob then took leave of Pharaoh and withdrew from his presence.

New RSV                               Jacob said to Pharaoh, ‘The years of my earthly sojourn are one hundred and thirty; few and hard have been the years of my life. They do not compare with the years of the life of my ancestors during their long sojourn.’ Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went out from the presence of Pharaoh.

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Pharaoh asked Ya‘akov, “How old are you?” and Ya‘akov replied, “The time of my stay on earth has been 130 years; they have been few and difficult, fewer than the years my ancestors lived.” Then Ya‘akov blessed Pharaoh and left his presence. A portion of v. 8 is included for context.

exeGeses companion Bible   And Yaaqov says to Paroh,

The days of the years of my sojournings

are a hundred years and thirty years:

few and evil be the days of the years of my life:

and reach not

to the days of the years of the life of my fathers

in the days of their sojournings.

And Yaaqov blesses Paroh

and goes from the face of Paroh:...

Hebraic Roots Bible               And Jacob said to Pharaoh, The days of the years of my camps are a hundred and thirty years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life and they have not reached the days of the years of the life of my fathers, in the days of their camps. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went out from before Pharaoh.

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               And Jacob answered Pharaoh, “The years of my sojourn [on earth] are one hundred and thirty. Few and hard have been the years of my life, nor do they come up to the life spans of my fathers during their sojourns.” Then Jacob bade Pharaoh farewell, and left Pharaoh’s presence.

Israeli Authorized Version      .

Kaplan Translation                 'My journey through life [Literally, 'the days of the years of my wandering.'] has lasted 130 years [Since Jacob was born in 2108 (Genesis 25:26), the year was now 2238 (1523 b.c.e.).],' replied Jacob. 'The days of my life have been few and hard. I did not live as long as my fathers did during their pilgrimage through life.' With that, Jacob blessed Pharaoh and left his presence.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Ya’akov said unto Pharaoh, The days of the shanim of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty shanah; few and bad have the days of the years of my life been, and have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my avot in the days of their pilgrimage.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Jacob said to him, “My life has been spent ·wandering from place to place [sojourning; residing as an alien]. It has been short and filled with trouble—only one hundred thirty years. My ·ancestors [fathers] ·lived [Lwandered; sojourned; lived as an alien] much longer than I.” Then Jacob blessed ·the king [LPharaoh] and ·left [Lwent out from before the Pharaoh].

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrima