Genesis 48

Written and compiled by Gary Kukis

Genesis 48:1–22

Jacob Blesses the Sons of Joseph


These studies are designed for believers in Jesus Christ only. If you have exercised faith in Christ, then you are in the right place. If you have not, then you need to heed the words of our Lord, Who said, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son, so that every [one] believing [or, trusting] in Him shall not perish, but shall be have eternal life! For God did not send His Son into the world so that He should judge the world, but so that the world shall be saved through Him. The one believing [or, trusting] in Him is not judged, but the one not believing has already been judged, because he has not believed in the Name of the only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son of God.” (John 3:16–18). “I am the Way and the Truth and the Life! No one comes to the Father except through [or, by means of] Me!” (John 14:6).


Every study of the Word of God ought to be preceded by a naming of your sins to God. This restores you to fellowship with God (1John 1:8–10). If there are people around, you would name these sins silently. If there is no one around, then it does not matter if you name them silently or whether you speak aloud.


Document Navigation

Preface

Quotations

Outline of Chapter

Charts, Graphics, Short Doctrines

Doctrines Alluded to

Chapters Alluded to

Dictionary of Terms

Introduction and Text

First Verse

Addendum

A Complete Translation

Chapter Word Clouds


Links to the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies of Genesis (HTML) (PDF) (that is what this document is). This incorporates 2 previous studies done in the book of Genesis. However, much of this material was thrown together without careful editing. Therefore, from time to time, there will be concepts and exegetical material which will be repeated, because there was no overall editing done once all of this material was combined.

 

There is a second, less complete set of weekly lessons of Genesis (HTML) (PDF). Every word of that study can be found in the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies.

 

This study makes reference to a wide-range of sources. There are quotations from doctrinal teachers, of course; but from Catholic commentaries and from other sources as well. Wherever I found relevant truth, I quoted from it or was inspired by it. Even though it is clear that some churches have a better concept of our reason for being here, that does not mean that there is no truth to be found anywhere else. So, from time to time, I will quote from John Calvin, even though I do not subscribe to 5-point Calvinism; I will quote from some Catholic sources, even though I believe that they are very wrong regarding Mary, the pope, apostolic succession and other such doctrines. The intention is for this to be the most thorough and accurate study of Genesis available anywhere.

 

Also, it is not necessary that you read the grey Hebrew exegesis tables. They are set apart from the rest of the study so that you can easily skip over them (based upon the suggestion of a friend). However, if you ever doubt the translation of a word, phrase or a verse, these translation tables are then available.


Preface: In Gen. 48, Jacob blesses Joseph’s two sons, but placing the younger brother before the older.


There are many chapter commentaries on the book of Genesis. This will be the most extensive examination of Genesis 48, where you will be able to examine in depth every word of the original text. Every attempt has been made to make this both a complete and self-contained study. Therefore, all references, vocabulary, and related concepts should be found within this extensive study. Easy access links to more in-depth studies of some vocabulary words, concepts and doctrines are also provided.


Quotations:


Outline of Chapter 48:

 

Preface

Introduction

 

         vv.     1–7           Jacob Adopts Manasseh and Ephraim, Thus Giving the Double Blessing to Joseph

         vv.     8–22         Jacob Places Ephraim (the Younger Son) Before Manasseh

 

Summary

Addendum


Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines:

 

         Preface               Quotations

 

         Introduction 

         Introduction         The Prequel of Genesis 48

         Introduction         The Principals of Genesis 48

         Introduction         The Places of Genesis 48

         Introduction         The Patriarchal Timeline for Genesis 48

         Introduction         A Synopsis of Genesis 48

         Introduction         Paragraph Divisions of Modern Translations for Genesis 48 (from Dr. Bob Utley)

         Introduction 

         Introduction 

 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.       2              A Privilege, a Responsibility and a Blessing

         v. 

         v. 

         v.       3              The Net Bible on El Shaddai

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.       8              “Who [are] these?” What does this mean?

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      12              "Jacob Blessing Ephraim and Manasseh" painted by Benjamin West

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      14              Jacob Is Blessing Joseph and His Sons from Illustrators of the 1897 Bible Pictures

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      16              The Heritage Bible on the Messenger of Jehovah

         v.      16              The Six Blind Men and the Elephant (a graphic)

         v. 

         v. 

         v. 

         v.      20              The Preeminence of Ephraim over Manasseh

         v.      20              Comparing Ephraim and Manasseh

         v.      20              Map of Ephraim and Manasseh

         v. 

         v.      22              Interpretations of Gen. 48:21–22

         v.      22              Jacob Gives Some Land to Joseph (Commentators/Discussion)

         v.      22              Tribal Allotments of Israel (Map)

         v.      22              Matthew Henry Summarizes Genesis 48

         v. 

 

         Summary            A Set of Summary Doctrines and Commentary

         Summary            Why Genesis 48 is in the Word of God

         Summary            What We Learn from Genesis 48

         Summary            B. H. Carroll Summarizes Genesis 48

         Summary            Edersheim Summarizes Genesis 48

         Summary 

 

         Addendum 

         Addendum          Josephus’ History of this Time Period

         Addendum          A Complete Translation of Genesis 48

         Addendum          Word Cloud from a Reasonably Literal Paraphrase of Genesis 48

         Addendum          Word Cloud from the Exegesis of Genesis 48


Chapter Outline

 

Charts, Graphics, Short Doctrines

Beginning of Document

Doctrines Covered or Alluded to

Chapters of the Bible Alluded to

Definition of Terms

Introduction and Text

Addendum

www.kukis.org

 

Exegetical Studies in Genesis


Doctrines Covered or Alluded To

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional doctrines and links are found in Definition of Terms below.


Chapters of the Bible Alluded To and/or Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

 

 

1Chron. 7

 


Many who read and study this chapter are 1st or 2nd generation students of R. B. Thieme, Jr., so that much of this vocabulary is second nature. One of Bob’s contributions to theology is a fresh vocabulary along with a number of concepts which are theologically new or reworked, yet still orthodox. Therefore, if you are unfamiliar with his work, the definitions below will help you to fully understand all that is being said. Also, I have developed a few new terms and concepts which require definition as well.

In addition, there are other more traditional yet technical theological terms which will be used and therefore defined as well.

Sometimes the terms in the exegesis of this chapter are simply alluded to, without any in-depth explanation of them. Sometimes, these terms are explained in detail and illustrated. A collection of all these terms is found here: (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Definition of Terms

Rebound (Restoration to fellowship with God)

In the New Testament, this is naming your sins to God, so that you are both restored to temporal fellowship with God and are then filled with the Spirit of God. In the Old Testament, naming your sins to God would result in a restoration of fellowship and, in some cases, the empowerment of the Holy Spirit once again (the Holy Spirit was not given to all Old Testament believers). See the Doctrine of Rebound (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Some of these definitions are taken from

http://gracebiblechurchwichita.org/

http://rickhughesministries.org/content/Biblical-Terms.pdf

http://www.gbible.org/index.php?proc=d4d

http://www.wordoftruthministries.org/terms-and-definitions/

http://www.theopedia.com/

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————


An Introduction to Genesis 48


I ntroduction: Gen. 48 is the first meeting between Jacob and his two grandsons by Joseph. They will be considered part of the twelve (actually, thirteen) tribes; there will not be a tribe called Joseph. This is Joseph's double portion, which is usually reserved for the first-born. As has often occurred in the Bible, Jacob will bless the younger over and above the older.


We are dealing with Jacob's last days on this earth and they are covered in detail in this and the next chapter. Obviously he was too old to write any of this; he could barely see (Gen. 48:10), as he was suffering from cataracts (that is an assumption on my part).


There are several portions of this chapter which I found difficult to understand (and, therefore, difficult for me to explain).


In Gen. 48, Joseph brings in his two sons to be blessed by his father Jacob. Jacob will adopt those sons (not as we think of as adoption), and therefore, it will be as if these sons came from Jacob. Therefore, there will be two tribes Israel which will come from Joseph: Ephraim and Manasseh (we never almost hear about the tribe of Joseph, except, interestingly enough, in Rev. 7:8). Joseph’s reward for his great faithfulness is, he will have the double portion. The blessing of the double portion—usually a blessing reserved for the firstborn—falls upon Joseph.


All that we have studied about Reuben, Joseph and Judah now comes into play. Reuben, as the firstborn, should have been the ruling tribe and the double-portion. However, Judah will become the ruling tribe and Joseph will receive the double-portion.


It is important to understand what has gone before.

The Prequel of Genesis 48

 

Gen. 48 will begin with

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


We need to know who the people are who populate this chapter.

The Principals of Genesis 48

Characters

Commentary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


We need to know where this chapter takes place.

The Places of Genesis 48

Place

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Patriarchal Timeline for Genesis 48


Legend

Birth or death

God speaks with Abraham

Historical incidents (most of which are related to Abraham)

Parenthetical dates (2065 b.c.) simply refer to taking the date assigned by the chronologist and using Scripture to determine the next date.

The entire Abrahamic Timeline (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

The entire Patriarchal Timeline (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

With Abraham, there are continual references to his age, which helps to determine relative dates. There are far fewer references to the ages of Isaac, Jacob and Joseph, which means that there is more guesswork involved in determining dates during their lifetimes.


MacDonald

(N. Berkeley Bible)

Reese’s Chronology Bible

Bible Hub

Ages

Scripture

Event/Description

2234 b.c.

2097 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:24

Terah, Abram’s father, is born. Gen 11:24–26 Nahor lived 29 years and fathered Terah. After he fathered Terah, Nahor lived 119 years and fathered other sons and daughters. Terah lived 70 years and fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

 

1978 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:25

Death of Nahor, Abram’s uncle

 

1969 b.c.

 

Noah is 950

Gen. 9:28–29

Death of Noah

2164 b.c.

1967 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 11:26–27

Abraham (Terah’s son) and Lot (Haran’s son) born in Ur of the Chaldeans. Abram would be the 43rd generation from Adam. Gen 11:26 Terah lived 70 years and fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

2078 b.c.

1881 b.c.

2080 b.c.

Abraham is 86

Gen. 16:15–16

Ishmael born to Abraham and Hagar in the land of Canaan. Gen 16:16 Abram was 86 years old when Hagar bore Ishmael to him.

2064 b.c. (2066 b.c.)

 

2066 b.c.

Abraham is 100

Gen. 21:1–7 1Chron. 1:34

Isaac born to Abraham. Isaac would be the 44th generation from Adam. Gen 21:5 Abraham was 100 years old when his son Isaac was born to him.

 

1841–

1816 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:12–16 1Chron. 1:29–31

Ishmael’s children.

 

1834 b.c.

1829 b.c. (Klassen)

2054 b.c.

 

Gen. 22:1–19

Abraham is told by God to go to the land of Moriah to offer up his son Isaac to God as a sacrifice. This was a 3-day journey away. They then go to Beer-sheba, which could simply indicate that they are returning home to Beer-sheba.

Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge Footnote puts this date at 1872 b.c., based upon Antiquities by Josephus.

(2029 b.c.)

1830 b.c.

2030 b.c.

Abraham is 137

Gen. 23:1–20

The death of Sarah. She dies in Kirjatharba, it is Hebron, in the land of Canaan. Gen 23:1 Now Sarah lived 127 years; these were all the years of her life. She is buried in a cave of the field of Machpelah before Mamre; it is Hebron, in the land of Canaan, purchased by Abraham from the sons of Heth.

(2026 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 24:1–67 Gen. 25:20

Isaac (Abraham’s son) and Rebecca. Gen. 25:20 Isaac was 40 years old when he took as his wife Rebekah daughter of Bethuel the Aramæan from Paddan-aram, and sister of Laban the Aramæan. At this time, Isaac is living in the Negev. It is likely that Abraham lived there as well; or near to there.

 

 

2026 b.c.

Isaac is 40

Gen. 25:20

Isaac marries Rebecca. Gen. 25:20

 

1826 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:1

Abraham marries Keturah. Smith puts the date at 1860 b.c.; and Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge at 1853 b.c.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 25:2–4 1Chron. 1:32–33

Abraham’s fathers children by Keturah.

 

1817 b.c.

 

Shem is 600

Gen. 11:11

Death of Shem.

2004 b.c.

1807 b.c.

2006 b.c.

Abraham is 160; Isaac is 60

Gen. 25:19, 21–26

Jacob & Esau born to Isaac. Gen 25:26 After this, his brother came out grasping Esau's heel with his hand. So he was named Jacob. Isaac was 60 years old when they were born. Therefore, Abraham would be 160 years old.

(1991 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 25:5–6

Isaac is the heir of all things that Abraham has (but, most importantly, of the covenant of God with Abraham).

1989 b.c.

1792 b.c.

1991 b.c.

Abraham is 175

Gen. 25:7–10

Abraham dies. Gen 25:7 This is the length of Abraham's life: 175 years. He is buried in the cave of Machpelah near Mamre, in the field of Nephron (this would be with Sarah).

 

 

 

 

Gen. 25:11

God blesses Isaac.

(1943 b.c.)

1788 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 25:17

The death of Ishmael. Gen 25:17 This is the length of Ishmael's life: 137 years. He took his last breath and died, and was gathered to his people.

 

 

 

Eber is 464

Gen. 11:17

Death of Eber.

 

1782 b.c.

1978 b.c.

 

Gen. 25:27–34

Jacob obtains Esau’s birthright for a mess of pottage.

 

1782 b.c.

1740 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:1–5

A famine in the land; God renews covenant with Isaac at Gerar.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 26:6–10

Rebecca and Isaac in Gerar.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 26:11–16

Isaac is blessed by God in Gerar.

 

1782 b.c.

1735 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:17–22

Strife between Isaac and Philistines in and near Gerar.

 

1767 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 26:34–35

Esau marries two Canaanite women.

 

1757–

1739 b.c.

1733 b.c.

(Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 26:23–25

Isaac makes an altar in Beer-sheba.

(1943 b.c.)

1744 b.c.

 

Ishmael is 137

Gen. 25:17–18

The death of Ishmael.

 

1738 b.c.

c 1732 b.c.

(Klassen)

1977 b.c.

 

Gen. 26:26–33

Isaac’s alliance with Abimelech at Beersheba.

(1929 b.c.)

1737 b.c.

1730 b.c. (Klassen)

1929 b.c.

 

Gen. 27:1–46

Jacob by deception receives a final blessing from Isaac that was meant for Esau.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 28:1–5

Jacob goes to his Uncle Laban’s home in Padan-aram for a wife.

 

 

1928 b.c.

 

Gen. 28:10–22

Jacob’s dream; God speaks to Jacob.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 28:6–9

Esau marries a daughter of Ishmael.

 

 

1906 b.c. (For descendants)

 

Gen. 36:1–42

Esau’s marriages and descendants.

 

1736 b.c.

1730 b.c. (Klassen)

1928 b.c.

 

Gen. 29:1–14

Jacob in Haran (Charan).

 

1736–

1729 b.c.

1730–

1723 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 29:15–20

Jacob works 7 years to marry Rachel, but is deceived by Laban, and Jacob marries Leah, her older sister.

 

1729 b.c.

1724 b.c. (Klassen)

1921 b.c.

 

Gen. 29:21–31

Jacob marries Rachel

(1915 b.c.)

1729–

1716 b.c.

1723–

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1921 b.c.

1916 b.c. (Rachel bears Joseph)

 

Gen. 29:32–34

Gen. 30:1–6

Gen. 29:35

Gen. 30:9, 7–8, 10–24

Jacob has 12 children by his wives, Rachel and Leah; and by their personal servants as well. Reese breaks the timeline down in smaller increments in his book.

1915 b.c.

 

 

 

Gen. 

Joseph is born.

 

1711 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 36:31–33

1Chron. 1:43–44

Gen. 26:34–39

1Chron. 1:45–50

Gen. 36:40–43

1Chron. 1:51–54

The kings of Edom.

(1909 b.c.)

1716 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 30:25–43

Gen. 31:1–16

Jacob’s final years with Laban.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 31:17–55

Jacob’s departure from Laban.

 

 

1908 b.c.

 

Gen. 32:1–23

Jacob returns to Canaan.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 32:24–32

Gen. 35:10

Jacob wrestles with the angel.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 33:1–16

Jacob meets Esau face to face.

 

1715 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 33:17–20

The resumption of Jacob’s journey.

 

1711–

1708 b.c.

1706–

1705 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 38:1–5

1Chron. 2:3

Judah fathers 3 sons.

 

1700 b.c.

1687 b.c. (Klassen)

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 34:1–31

Dinah, daughter of Judah, is defiled.

 

 

1906 b.c.

 

Gen. 35:1–15

Jacob returns to Bethel.

 

1700 b.c.

1710 b.c. (Klassen)

1903 b.c.

 

Gen. 35:16–19 48:7 35:20–22

Rachel dies when giving birth to Benjamin.

(1898 b.c.)

 

 

 

Gen. 35:27 37:1

The return to Hebron.

 

1699 b.c.

 

Joseph is 17

Gen. 37:2–11

Joseph—his early days and his dreams.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 37:12–35

Joseph in Shechem and Dothan.

1897 b.c.

 

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 37:36 39:1

Joseph is sold into slavery, to end up in Egypt.

 

c1699–

1690 b.c.

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:2–6

Joseph enjoys prosperity in Egypt.

 

c1695 b.c.

1707 b.c. (Klassen)

1898 b.c.

 

Gen. 38:6–11

Judah and Tamar.

 

1692 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 38:12–26

Judah’s wife dies.

 

1692 b.c.

1691 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 38:27–30

1Chron. 2:4

The birth of Pharez, the 41st generation from Adam.

 

c1690 b.c.

1689 b.c. (Klassen)

1889 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:7–19

Joseph flees adultery.

 

 

1889 b.c.

 

Gen. 39:20–23

Joseph is put into jail; yet prospers in jail.

(1887 b.c.)

1688 b.c.

1887 b.c.

 

Gen. 40:1–23

Joseph gives the interpretation of the dreams of the baker and the butler.

1884 b.c.

1687 b.c.

 

Isaac is 180

Gen. 35:28–29

The death of Isaac. Now the days of Isaac were 180 years. (Gen. 35:28)

(1885 b.c.)

1686 b.c.

1886 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:1–37

Joseph interprets the Pharaoh’s dream.

 

 

1886 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:38–44

Joseph is made governor.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 41:45

Joseph marries Asenath.

1884 b.c.

1686–

1679 b.c.

1886 b.c. (Beginning)

 

Gen. 41:46–49

The 7 years of plenty.

 

1685–

1683 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 41:50–53

Sons are born to Joseph.

 

1685–

1681 b.c.

 

 

Ex. 6:16 Num. 3:17 1Chron. 6:1, 16

The descendants of Levi are born.

 

1679–

1672 b.c.

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 41:54–57

The seven years of famine.

(1876 b.c.)

1678 b.c.

1677 b.c. (Klassen)

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 42:1–44:34

Joseph provides his family with food.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 45:1–15

Joseph reveals himself to his brothers.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 45:16–28

Jacob hears that his son, Joseph, is still alive, and he prepares to travel to Egypt himself.

 

1677 b.c.

 

 

Ruth 4:18 1Chron. 2:5

Birth of Hezron, the 40th generation.

1873 b.c. Footnote

1677 b.c.

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 46:1–7, 28

Jacob goes to Egypt after God’s assurance in Beersheba.

 

 

1875 b.c.

Jacob is 130

Gen. 46:8–27 Ex. 1:1–5

Summary of the 70 who came to Egypt. Compare Gen. 47:8–9 and 46:27 for Jacob’s age.

 

 

1875 b.c.

 

Gen. 46:29–34 47:1–12

The people of Joseph are established in Egypt.

 

1676–

1675 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 47:13–21

Joseph continues as prime minister in Egypt, exercising wise leadership during the famine.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:22–26

The land of the priests in Egypt.

 

1672–

1593 b.c.

 

 

1Chron. 2:6–8

Zerah, the brother of Pharez, and his descendants.

 

1671 b.c.

1660 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Gen. 48:1–22

Blessings to Manasseh and Ephraim.

 

1660 b.c.

1665 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

Birth of Berith to Ephraim.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 47:28–31

The last days of Jacob; his charge to Joseph.

 

 

1859 b.c.

 

Gen. 49:1–32

Jacob speaks to his sons, giving them their final blessings and encouraging them.

1857 b.c.

1660 b.c.

1859 b.c.

Jacob is 147

Gen. 49:33

The death of Jacob.

 

 

1859 b.c.

 

Gen. 50:1–14

The burial of Jacob.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 50:15–21

The fears of Joseph’s brothers after the death of Jacob.

 

1638 b.c.

1644 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

Birth of Resheph (who is in the line between Ephraim and Joshua).

 

1625 b.c.

1620 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

Num. 26:58

Birth of Aram (Levi’s grandson and Moses’ father.

 

1623 b.c.

1604 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

The birth of Ram, the 39th generation.

 

1615 b.c.

1625 b.c. (Klassen)

 

 

 

The birth of Telah, in the line between Ephraim and Joshua.

 

 

 

 

Gen. 50:22–23

Joseph’s last days.

 

1606 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 50:24–25

Joseph’s last words.

1805 b.c. (1805 b.c.)

 

1806 b.c.

Joseph is 110

Gen. 50:26 Ex. 1:6

The death of Joseph. His brothers also die.

 

1606–

1462 b.c.

 

 

Gen. 47:27 Ex. 1:7

The population explosion among the Jews living in Egypt.


Bibliography

MacDonald’s timeline is from: http://www.bibleistrue.com/qna/qna63.htm accessed October 11, 2011 and August 12, 2014. Included in MacDonald’s timeline is a timeline for Egypt interspersed.

See http://www.bibleistrue.com/qna/qna63dating.htm for his justification of his timeline.


The Bible Hub timeline (accessed January 11, 2015) appears to be pretty thorough, but no one specifically is credited.

From: http://www.christianshepherd.org/bible_study_guides/abram_to_the_exodus.pdf (Christian shepherd). This source believes that the Jews live only a short time in Egypt (210 years).

The Reese Chronological Bible; KJV translation; Editor: Edward Reese; ©1977 by Edward Reese and Klassen’s dating system ©1975 by Frank R. Klassen; Ⓟ1980 by Bethany House Publishers, South Minneapolis, MN; pp. 18–19, 54–74.


The Modern Language Bible (The New Berkeley Version), Revised Edition; ©1969 by Hendrickson Publishers, Inc.; pp. 10–54.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Here is what to expect from Genesis 48:

A Synopsis of Genesis 48

 

 

 

 

Like all chapters of the Word of God, you need more than just the simple plot outline to understand what God wants us to know.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Murai divides up the 48th chapter into a chiasmos.

Hajime Murai’s Structure of Genesis 48:1-22

A       (48:1-7)      Manasseh and Ephraim become Jacob's sons

         B       (48:8-12)    Jacob wants to bless Manasseh and Ephraim

                  C      (48:13-14)  Israel put right hand on Ephraim (בימינו)

                            D      (48:15-16)  Blessing for Joseph

                  C'      (48:17-19)  Joseph protested that Israel put right hand on Ephraim (ימינו)

         B'      (48:20)       The blessing of Manasseh and Ephraim

A'      (48:21-22)  Joseph is given a blessing above his brothers (48:22)

From Hajime Murai’s Literary Structures of Genesis; accessed January 24, 2017 (slightly edited).


The first title is often applicable to the entire chapter (although it may pertain just to the verses which follow it to the next section heading).

Paragraph Divisions of Modern Translations for Genesis 48 (from Dr. Bob Utley)

NASB

NKJV

NRSV

TEV

NJB (FOLLOWS MT)

Israel's Last Days

Jacob Blesses Joseph's Sons

Jacob's Adoption and Blessing of Ephraim and Manasse
(Gen. 47:27 to Gen. 48:22)

Jacob Blesses Ephraim and Manasseh

Jacob Adopts Joseph's Two Sons and Blesses Them

Gen. 48:1-7

Gen. 48:1-7

Gen. 48:1-7

Gen. 48:1-4

Gen. 48:1-6

 

 

 

Gen. 48:5-7

 Gen. 48:7

Gen. 48:8-16

Gen. 48:8-16

Gen. 48:8-16

Gen. 48:8

Gen. 48:8-12

 

 

 

Gen. 48:9 a

 

 

 

 

Gen. 48:9-12

 

 

 

 

Gen. 48:13-16

Gen. 48:13-16

 (Gen. 48:15-16)

 (Gen. 48:15-16)

 (Gen. 48:15-16)

 (Gen. 48:15-16)

 (Gen. 48:15-16)

Gen. 48:17-22

Gen. 48:17-22

Gen. 48:17-22

Gen. 48:17-18

Gen. 48:17-19

 

 

 

Gen. 48:19

 

 (Gen. 48:20)

 

 (Gen. 48:20)

Gen. 48:20
(Gen. 48:20)

Gen. 48:20
(Gen. 48:20)

 

 

 

Gen. 48:21-22

Gen. 48:21-22

From Dr. Bob Utley, Copyright © 2014 Bible Lessons International; www.freebiblecommentary.org; from e-sword; Gen. 48 chapter comments).

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


As always, 3 separate translations will be produced for each verse. The slavishly literal translation attempts to preserve word order and number, making it more literal than Young’s translation (however, I do not preserve the consistency of the translation that Young does). The moderately literal translation may add or delete a definite article, change the number of a noun to correspond with the English sense of thinking, and the order is often changed in order to better represent our English sentence structure. The paraphrase is an attempt to give a thought-for-thought interpretation of what each verse tells us.


Jacob Adopts Manasseh and Ephraim, Thus Giving the Double Blessing to Joseph


Kukis slavishly literal:

 

Kukis moderately literal:

And so he is after the words the these and so he says to Joseph, “Behold, your father is ill.” And so he takes two of his sons with him—Manasseh and Ephraim.

Genesis

48:1

After these things, [one] says to Joseph, “Observe, your father is ill [and dying].” Therefore, Joseph [lit., he] took his two sons—Manasseh and Ephraim—with him [to see his father].

Kukis not-so-literal paraphrase:

After these things, an official came to Joseph and told him that his father was very ill and possibly dying. Therefore, Joseph took Manasseh and Ephraim, his two sons, to go see his father.


Here is how others have translated this verse:

 

Ancient texts:                       Note: I compare the Hebrew text to English translations of the Latin, Syriac (= Aramaic) and Greek texts, using the Douay-Rheims translation Footnote ; George Lamsa’s translation, and Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton’s translation as revised and edited by Paul W. Esposito, respectively. I often update these texts with non-substantive changes (e.g., you for thou, etc.). I often use the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible instead of Brenton’s translation, because it updates the English text.

 

The Septuagint was the earliest known translation of a book (circa 200 b.c.). Since this translation was made before the textual criticism had been developed into a science and because different books appear to be translated by different men, the Greek translation can sometimes be very uneven.

 

When there are serious disparities between my translation and Brenton’s (or the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible), I look at the Greek text of the Septuagint (the LXX) to see if a substantive difference actually exists (and I reflect these changes in the English rendering of the Greek text). I use the Greek LXX with Strong’s numbers and morphology available for e-sword. The only problem with this resource (which is a problem for similar resources) is, there is no way to further explore Greek verbs which are not found in the New Testament. Although I usually quote the Complete Apostles’ Bible here, I have begun to make changes in the translation when their translation conflicts with the Greek and note what those changes are.

 

The Masoretic text is the Hebrew text with all of the vowels (vowel points) inserted (the original Hebrew text lacked vowels). We take the Masoretic text to be the text closest to the original. However, differences between the Masoretic text and the Greek, Latin and Syriac are worth noting and, once in a great while, represent a more accurate text possessed by those other ancient translators.

 

In general, the Latin text is an outstanding translation from the Hebrew text into Latin and very trustworthy (I say this as a non-Catholic). Unfortunately, I do not read Latin—apart from some very obvious words—so I am dependent upon the English translation of the Latin (principally, the Douay-Rheims translation).

 

Underlined words indicate differences in the text.

 

Bracketed portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls are words, letters and phrases lost in the scroll due to various types of damage. Underlined words or phrases are those in the Dead Sea Scrolls but not in the Masoretic text.

 

I will only list the translation from the Dead Sea Scrolls if it exists and if it is different from the Masoretic text.

 

The Targum of Onkelos is actually the Pentateuchal Targumim, which are The Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan Ben Uzziel. On the Pentateuch With The Fragments of the Jerusalem Targum From the Chaldee by J. W. Etheridge, M.A. From http://www.becomingjewish.org/texts/targum/onkelos_genesis.html and first published in 1862.

 

The very fact that we have ancient Greek, Latin, Syriac and Arabic translations of the Bible testifies to its accuracy. There may be a difference word or phrase here or there; the Greek may have a singular where the Hebrew has a plural, but there is no set of doctrines in the Latin Bible which are any different from those found in the Greek Bible or the Syriac Bible. These different cultures when they chose to translate the Bible chose to translate it as accurately as possible. Where human viewpoint would expect to find doctrinal differences between the Bible of the Hebrews, of the Greeks or of the Romans, no such differences exist.


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so he is after the words the these and so he says to Joseph, “Behold, your father is ill.” And so he takes two of his sons with him—Manasseh and Ephraim.

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum (trans. Etheridge)      .

Targum (Onkelos)                  And it was after these words that it was said to Joseph, Behold, thy father is ill. And he took his two sons with him, Menashe and Ephraim. Translation for Onkelos and Pseudo-Jonathan by J. W. Etheridge, M.A. (1862).

Targum (Pseudo-Jonathan)   And after these things it was told Joseph, Behold, thy father is lying ill. And he took his two sons with him., Menasheh and Ephraim.

Jerusalem targum                  .

Revised Douay-Rheims         .

Douay-Rheims 1899 (Amer.) After these things, it was told Joseph that his father was sick: and he set out to go to him, taking his two sons Manasses and Ephraim.

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        It happened after these things, that someone said to Yoseph, "Behold, your father is sick." He took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Peshitta (Syriac) Footnote                     AND it came to pass after these things that Joseph was told, Behold, your father is sick; and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Septuagint (Greek)                Jacob blesses Ephraim and Manasseh. Gn.48.1-22

And it came to pass after these things, that it was reported to Joseph, Behold, your father is ill; and, having taken his two sons, Manasse and Ephraim, he came to Jacob. This is the New Brenton translation from http://www.katapi.org.uk/

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations: Footnote

 

Bible in Basic English             .

Easy English                          Some time passed. And someone told Joseph, ‘Your father is ill.’ So, Joseph took his 2 sons, Manasseh and Ephraim with him.

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2008  .

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

International Children’s B.     Blessings for Manasseh and Ephraim

Some time later Joseph learned that his father was very sick. So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim and went to his father.

The Message                         Some time after this conversation, Joseph was told, “Your father is ill.” He took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, and went to Jacob.

Names of God Bible               Jacob [Israel] Blesses Joseph’s Two Sons

Later Joseph was told, “Your father is ill.” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim to see Jacob.

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           .

Contemporary English V.       Joseph was told that his father Jacob had become very sick. So Joseph went to see him and took along his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

The Living Bible                     One day not long after this, word came to Joseph that his father was failing rapidly. So, taking with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, he went to visit him.

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             Blessings for Manasseh and Ephraim

Some time later Joseph learned that his father was very sick, so he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim and went to his father.

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           Jacob Blesses Manasseh and Ephraim

One day not long after this, word came to Joseph, “Your father is failing rapidly.” So Joseph went to visit his father, and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Well sometime after that, this report came to JoSeph: '{Look!} Your father is ill!' So he took his two sons, ManasSeh and Ephraim, and they went to [see] Jacob.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Joseph Visits His Ill Father

Some time later, somebody informed Joseph, “Your father is ill!” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim with him to visit Jacob [The Heb. lacks to visit Jacob].

New Advent (Knox) Bible       Soon after this, Joseph was told that his father had fallen sick, and took his two sons, Ephraim and Manasses, to visit him.

Revised Knox Bible                .

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators                                 Jacob blessed Ephraim and Manasseh

Some time after this, someone told Joseph, “Hey, your father is ill.” When Joseph heard that, he took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, to see his father.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   After these concerns, it was said to Joseph: Your father is to be ailing. He was to take his two sons with him, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Conservapedia                       It happened after these things that someone told Joseph, "Sir! Your father is ill." He took his sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, with him.

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                But it was after these events that it was reported to Joseph, " Your father is ill," so he took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, with him ; and Jacob was told, " Your son Joseph has come to you." A portion of v. 2 is included for context.

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           (Part Eight)

After these deeds, tidings were brought unto Joseph, that his father was sick. And he took with him his two sons, Manasse and Ephraim.

HCSB                                     Jacob Blesses Ephraim and Manasseh

Some time after this, Joseph was told, “Your father is weaker.”.

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

H. C. Leupold                         CHAPTER XLVIII

12. Jacob’s Provisions for His End (Continued)

b. The Blessing of Joseph’s Sons (48:1-22)

And it came to pass after these things that the report came to Joseph: Behold, thy father is sick. So he took his two sons along with him, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Lexham English Bible            .

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                Blessing of Ephraim and Manasseh

After these things, someone told Joseph, “Behold, your father is sick.” So he took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, with him.

Urim-Thummim Version         After some time had passed it was reported to Joseph, your dad is sick: and he then brought with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Wikipedia Bible Project          .


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  Jacob adopts Joseph’s children

Some time later, when Joseph was told that his father was ill, he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

The Heritage Bible                 And it was after these words, that one told Joseph, Lo, your father is worn out; and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011) Footnote    Some time afterward, Joseph was informed, “Your father is failing.” So he took along with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

[48:1–22] Jacob continues his preparations for death. In a scene that evokes the nearly blind Isaac blessing Jacob and Esau (chap. 27), Jacob blesses Joseph’s two sons. He adopts them, elevating them to a status equal to that of Jacob’s first sons Reuben and Simeon (cf. 1 Chr 5:1). The adoption is one more instance of Jacob’s favoring Rachel and those born of her. The mention of Jacob’s failing eyesight and his selection of the younger son over the older evokes the great deathbed scene in chap. 27. He reaffirms to Joseph the ancient divine promise of progeny and land.

New Jerusalem Bible             .

New Revised Standard V.      .

Revised English Bible            Some time later Joseph was informed that his father was ill, so he took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, with him and came to Jacob.


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Awhile later someone told Yosef that his father was ill. He took with him his two sons, M’nasheh and Efrayim.

exeGeses companion Bible   THE FINAL DAYS OF YISRA EL

And so be it, after these words,

someone tells Yoseph, Behold, your father is sick:

and he takes with him his two sons,

Menash Sheh and Ephrayim.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

Israeli Authorized Version      .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               Some time afterward, Joseph was told, “Your father is ill.” So he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Kaplan Translation                 Jacob's Last Days

A short time after this, Joseph was told that his father was sick. [Joseph went to his father,] taking his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, along with him. The Kaplan Translation, particularly in Exodus through Deuteronomy, takes note of historic rabbinic opinions.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And it came to pass after these things, that one told Yosef, Hinei, Avicha is choleh (ill); and he took with him his two banim, Menasheh and Ephrayim.

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                Israel’s Last Days

Now some time after these things happened, Joseph was told, “Your father is sick.” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim with him [to go to Goshen].

The Expanded Bible              Blessings for Manasseh and Ephraim

·Some time later [LAnd after these things] Joseph ·learned [was told] that his father was very sick, so he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim ·and went to his father [Lwith him].

Kretzmann’s Commentary    Verses 1-7

Jacob Adopts the Sons of Joseph

And it came to pass after these things that one told Joseph, the news was brought him by a special messenger, Behold, thy father is sick. This was not long after Jacob had made arrangements for the transfer of his body to Canaan for burial. And he (Joseph) took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, who were now about twenty years old; Manasseh may have been about twenty-four and Ephraim a few years younger.

NET Bible®                             Manasseh and Ephraim

After these things Joseph was told [Heb “and one said.” With no expressed subject in the Hebrew text, the verb can be translated with the passive voice.], “Your father is weakening.” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim with him. When it comes to making an actual material change to the text, the NET Bible® is pretty good about indicating this. Since most of these corrections will be clear in the more literal translations below and within the Hebrew exegesis itself, I will not continue to list every NET Bible® footnote. Language footnotes will be placed in the Hebrew exegesis. Some footnotes will quoted elsewhere in this document.

Syndein/Thieme                     {Jacob Blesses Joseph's Sons and Treats Them Both as His Own Sons}

{Verses 1-7: Jacob takes Three Looks at Life - 2) Now Looks Backward}

And it came to pass after these things, that one told Joseph, Behold, your father is sick and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh {oldest} and Ephraim.

The Voice

Jacob bows his final bow—perhaps in the weakness of old age or in thankfulness for Joseph’s promise, or maybe in prayer to the Lord.

In the days of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, custom demands that the firstborn son become the next head of the family and inherit the name, status, and wealth of his father. But as we have seen throughout Genesis, God makes a habit of ignoring human customs, subverting tradition, and privileging the younger over the older. When it comes to the covenant, God typically chooses to pass its blessings and duties to the younger. The trend continues throughout Scripture as God selects David and then Solomon, both younger sons, as the two greatest kings over Israel. It is almost humorous the way Joseph tries to engineer the situation placing Manasseh, his firstborn, at his father’s right hand to receive the greater blessing. But Israel has none of it. He crosses his hands and extends the right hand to Ephraim, the second-born. Joseph is sure his ailing father has made a mistake. But Jacob knows exactly what he is doing.

Soon after this, Joseph was brought word that his father was gravely ill; so he took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, to see Jacob.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and it came to pass, after these words, and he said to Yoseph [Adding], look, your father is sick and he took his two sons with him, Menasheh [Causing to overlook] and Ephrayim [Double fruitfulness],...

Concordant Literal Version    And coming is it after these things that someone is saying to Joseph, "Behold! Your father is ailing.And taking is he his two sons with him, Manasseh and Ephraim, and comes to Jacob.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  And it came to pass after these things, that one said to Joseph, Lo! thy father, is sick. So he took his two sons with him, Manasseh and Ephraim. I need to point out that this reads Lo! and not Lol.

English Standard Version      Jacob Blesses Ephraim and Manasseh

After this, Joseph was told, "Behold, your father is ill." So he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    And after these things it happened, one said to Joseph, Behold, your father is sick. And he took his two sons with him, Manasseh and Ephraim.

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         Jacob Blesses Joseph’s Sons

After these things, Joseph was told, “Your father is sick.” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim with him.

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     Israel’s Last Days

Now it came about after these things that Joseph was told, “Behold, your father is sick.” So he took his two sons Manasseh and Ephraim with him.

New European Version          Jacob Blesses Joseph’s Sons

It happened after these things, that someone said to Joseph, Behold, your father is sick. He took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Ron Snider’s Translation       .

Stuart Wolf’s Translation       .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  And it came to pass after these things, that one told Joseph, Behold, thy father is sick: and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And it comes to pass, after these things, that one says to Joseph, “Lo, your father is sick;” and he takes his two sons with him, Manasseh and Ephraim.

 

The gist of this passage:     Much time passes; and we come to a time when Jacob is seriously ill; and Joseph is informed of this.


Genesis 48:1a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW]

to be, is, was, are; to become, to come into being; to come to pass

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #1961 BDB #224

Without a specific subject and object, the verb hâyâh often means and it will come to be, and it will come to pass, then it came to pass (with the wâw consecutive). It may be more idiomatically rendered subsequently, afterwards, later on, in the course of time, after which. Generally, the verb does not match the gender whatever nearby noun could be the subject (and, as often, there is no noun nearby which would fulfill the conditions of being a subject).

ʾachar (אַחַר) [pronounced ah-KHAHR]

after, following, behind; afterwards, after that; another

preposition/adverb

Strong’s #310 BDB #29

debârîym (דְּבָרִים) [pronounced dawb-vawr-EEM]

words, sayings, doctrines, commands; things, matters, reports

masculine plural noun with the definite article

Strong's #1697 BDB #182

ʾêlleh (אֵלֶּה) [pronounced ALE-leh]

these, these things

demonstrative plural adjective with the definite article

Strong's #428 BDB #41

Literally, this reads, after the words the these; but this means after these things, following these events.

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415


Translation: After these things, [one] says to Joseph,... There are no chapter or verse divisions in the original text. However, there are natural breaks and natural divisions. The previous things were Joseph’s handling of the famine and the people who came to him without any silver and yet needed grain to eat. After that, Jacob asked Joseph to see to it that he would be buried in the Land of Promise (one of Jacob’s great moments).


Now, because the person speaking is not named, it would appear at first to be Jacob from the previous chapter. However, the words after these things takes us to a different time and possibly different place. So, all of this takes place after the incidents just summarized, meaning that we are no longer with Jacob and Joseph.


Based upon the context, the person speaking is neither Jacob nor Joseph; so this is likely an official and/or messenger.


Genesis 48:1b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

hinnêh (הִנֵּה) [pronounced hin-NAY]

lo, behold, or more freely, observe, look here, look, listen, note, take note, duly note [that]; pay attention, get this, check this out

interjection, exclamatory particle, demonstrative particle

Strong’s #2009 (and #518, 2006) BDB #243

This seems to attempt to take others and put them in the place of the person saying this (so that they see the same thing); or to grab the attention of the reader. From the many times I have seen this word used in a narrative, I believe that we may update the translation to, he observed [that]; he saw; suddenly, unexpectedly, dramatically. This goes along with the idea that this word is to cause us to see things from the viewpoint of someone in the narrative.

ʾâb (אָב) [pronounced awbv]

father, both as the head of a household, clan or tribe; ancestor, grandfather; founder, civil leader, military leader; master, teacher

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1 BDB #3

châlâh (חָלָה) [pronounced chaw-LAW]

is worn down in strength, is weak, is infirm; being sick, becoming ill; having pained

Qal active participle

Strong’s #2470 BDB #317


Translation: ...“Observe, your father is ill [and dying].” This messenger came to Joseph and told him that his father Jacob was dying. He tells Joseph that his father is ill, but the idea is, his father is seriously ill. The reason that we know this is twofold: (1) someone comes and tells Joseph this (the #2 man in Egypt); and (2) Joseph will take his sons with him to see his sickly father.


Genesis 48:1c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

lâqach (לָקַח) [pronounced law-KAHKH]

to take, to take away, to take in marriage; to seize

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #3947 BDB #542

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

shenêy (שְנֵי) [pronounced shen-Ā]

two, two of, a pair of, a duo of; both of

dual numeral construct

Strong’s #8147 BDB #1040

bânîym (בָּנִים) [pronounced baw-NEEM]

sons, descendants; children; people; sometimes rendered men; young men, youths

masculine plural noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1121 BDB #119

ʿîm (עִם) [pronounced ģeem]

with, at, by, near; like; from

preposition of nearness and vicinity; with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #5973 BDB #767

Menashsheh (מְנַשֶּה) [pronounced mehn-ahsh-SHEH]

causing to forget; transliterated Manasseh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #4519 BDB #586

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾEpherayim (אֶפְרַיִם) [pronounced ef-RAH-yim]

to bear fruit, to be fruitful; double ash heap transliterated Ephraim

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #669 BDB #68


Translation: Therefore, Joseph [lit., he] took his two sons—Manasseh and Ephraim—with him [to see his father]. As a result, Joseph took his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, to see his father.

 

The Christian Community Bible: The twelve tribes of Israel were actually thirteen, with the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, together, called the tribes of Joseph. This is how they arrived at the number twelve. The present chapter explains this: Ephraim and Manasseh will be considered as two sons of Jacob to replace Joseph. Jacob’s blessing, like the blessing of Isaac, his father, goes to the younger son and not to the elder. God favors whom he wishes, and is not bound to regard the right of succession, or the parents’ wishes. Footnote


Because of his various duties, Joseph had not yet brought his sons to his father for his blessing. However, this information concerning his father's illness indicated that there was not much time left.


Genesis 48:1 And it happened after these things, that one told Joseph, “Behold, your father is sick.” And he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.


The language used here suggests a succession of events. What occurred in Gen. 47 happened previous to this passage (there are no chapter divisions in the original text).


Joseph goes to Jacob with his two sons. Jacob is going to bless these two sons as if they were his own. In this, Joseph receives the double-portion which is usually reserved for the firstborn son.


Near the end of the life of a patriarch, he would gather his sons and bless them (or son; Abraham blessed Isaac and then Isaac blessed who he thought was Esau). Jacob would bless his 12 sons; but first, he would adopt and then bless Joseph’s two sons.


——————————



And so [one] made known to Jacob and so he said, “Behold your son Joseph has come unto you.” And so strengthens [himself] Israel and so he sits upon the bed.

Genesis

48:2

[One] made known to Jacob and said, “Behold, your son Joseph has come to you.” So Israel strengthened [himself] and he sat [up] on the bed.

One made it known to Jacob that his son Joseph had come to him. So Israel strengthened himself and sat up on the bed.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so [one] made known to Jacob and so he said, “Behold your son Joseph has come unto you.” And so strengthens [himself] Israel and so he sits upon the bed.

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And it was shown to Jakob, and told (him,) Behold, thy son Joseph cometh to thee. And Israel was strengthened [Sam. Vers. "strengthened himself."], and he sat upon the bed.

Pseudo Jonathan targum       And it was announced to Jakob, saying, Behold, thy son Joseph hath come to thee: and Israel strengthened himself, and sat upon the bed.

Revised Douay-Rheims         And it was told the old man: Behold thy son Joseph cometh to thee. And being strengthened he sat on his bed.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Someone told Ya'aqub, and said, "Behold, your son Yoseph comes to you," and Yisrael strengthened himself, and sat on the bed.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And they informed Jacob, and said to him, Behold, your son Joseph has come to you; and Israel strengthened himself, and sat up on the bed.

Septuagint (Greek)                And it was reported to Jacob, saying, Behold, your son Joseph is coming to you; and Israel having strengthened himself, sat upon the bed.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And when they said to Jacob, Your son Joseph is coming to see you: then Israel, getting all his strength together, had himself lifted up in his bed.

Easy English                          Someone told Jacob, ‘Your son Joseph has come to you.’ So Israel made himself as strong as he could. And he sat up on the bed.

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  When Joseph arrived, someone told Israel, “Your son Joseph has come to see you.” Israel was very weak, but he tried hard and sat up in his bed.

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

International Children’s B.     When Joseph arrived, someone told Jacob, also called Israel, “Your son Joseph has come to see you.” Jacob was weak. So he used all his strength and sat up on his bed.

The Message                         When Jacob was told, “Your son Joseph has come,” he roused himself and sat up in bed.

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      Jacob was told, “Your son Joseph has come to you.” So Israel became stronger and sat up in bed.

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           When Jacob was informed, “Your son Joseph is here now,” he pulled himself together and sat up in bed.

Contemporary English V.       When Joseph arrived, someone told Jacob, "Your son Joseph has come to see you." Jacob sat up in bed, but it took almost all his strength.

The Living Bible                     When Jacob heard that Joseph had arrived, he gathered his strength and sat up in the bed to greet him, and said to him,

“God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me, and said to me, ‘I will make you a great nation and I will give this land of Canaan to you and to your children’s children, for an everlasting possession.’ Vv. 3–4 are included for context.

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             When Joseph arrived, someone told Jacob, “Your son Joseph has come to see you.” Jacob was weak, so he used all his strength and sat up on his bed.

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           .


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And when Jacob was told, '{Look!} Your son JoSeph has come to see you,' IsraEl straightened himself and sat up on his bed.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        As soon as Jacob was informed, “Look! Your son Joseph has come to visit you,” Israel rallied his strength and sat up in bed.

New Advent (Knox) Bible       .

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     When someone told Jacob, “Look, your son Joseph has come to see you!” Jacob sat up on the bed, even though it was difficult for him to do that.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   They were to report it to Jacob, even were to say: Your son Joseph is coming out to you. Isra-el was to take hold strength, and was to sit on his bed.

Conservapedia                       Someone else told Jacob, "Sir, your son Joseph is coming to you." Israel then encouraged himself to sit up on his couch.

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                ...and Jacob was told, " Your son Joseph has come to you." Then Israel exerted himself and sat up in his bed, and Jacob said to Joseph, " The Almighty God appeared to me on my departure from the land of Canan, and blessed me, and said to me ; ' I will make you nourish, and increase your family, and make you an assembly of nations ; and I will give this land to your race after you as a possession for ever. Vv. 3–4 are included for context.

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           .

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         When it was told to Jacob: Behold, thy son Joseph is coming to thee, Israel made himself strong and sat upon his bed.

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         Then Jacob was told, your son Joseph comes to you so Israel then revived his strength, and sat up on his bed.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And he said to Jacob: "Here you son Joseph has come to you." and he embraced Joseph, and sat on the bed.


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  So they told Jacob that Joseph his son had come. Then Israel, mustering his strength, sat up in bed.

The Heritage Bible                 And one caused it to stand out boldly to Jacob, and said, Behold, your son, Joseph, is coming to you, and Israel seized the bed, and sat upon it.

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   When Jacob was told, “Your son Joseph has come to you,” Israel rallied his strength and sat up in bed.

New Jerusalem Bible             When Jacob was told, 'Look, your son Joseph has come to you,' Israel, summoning his strength, sat up in bed.

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Ya‘akov was told, “Here comes your son Yosef.” Isra’el gathered his strength and sat up in bed.

exeGeses companion Bible   And someone tells Yaaqov and says,

Behold, your son Yoseph comes to you.

- and Yisra El strengthens himself

and sits on the bed.

Hebraic Roots Bible               And one spoke to Jacob and said, Behold, your son Joseph has come to you. And Israel took strength and sat on the bed.

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               .

Judaica Press Complete T.    .

Kaplan Translation                 When Jacob was told that Joseph was coming to him, Israel summoned his strength and sat up in bed.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And one told Ya’akov, and said, Hinei, the ben of thee Yosef cometh unto thee; and Yisroel strengthened himself, and sat up upon the mittah (bed).

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              When Joseph arrived, someone told Jacob, “Your son Joseph has come to see you.” ·Jacob [LIsrael; another name for Jacob; 32:28] ·was weak, so he ·used all [Lsummoned] his strength and sat up on his bed.

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And one told Jacob and said, Behold, thy son Joseph cometh unto thee, also an announcement by a special messenger. And Israel strengthened himself, with the help of God he summoned all his remaining strength, and sat upon the bed; for he, as patriarch and bearer of the Messianic promise, had a final duty to perform.

NET Bible®                             When Jacob was told [Heb “and one told and said.” The verbs have no expressed subject and can be translated with the passive voice.], “Your son Joseph has just [Heb “Look, your son Joseph.”] come to you,” Israel regained strength and sat up on his bed.

Syndein/Thieme                     {Death Bed Visit}

And one told Jacob, and kept on saying, Behold, your son Joseph comes unto you. And Israel {Jacob} strengthened himself, and sat upon the bed.

The Voice                               When Jacob was told that his son Joseph had come to see him, he gathered his strength and sat up in bed.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and he told Ya'aqov [He restrains] and he said, look, your son Yoseph [Adding] had come to you and Yisra'el [He turns El] strengthened himself and he settled upon the bed,...

Concordant Literal Version    And someone is telling Jacob and saying, "Behold! Your son Joseph is coming to you. And encouraging himself is Israel, and is sitting on the couch.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  And one told Jacob, and said—Lo! thy son Joseph, coming in unto thee. So Israel strengthened himself, and sat up on the couch.

English Standard Version      And it was told to Jacob, "Your son Joseph has come to you." Then Israel summoned his strength and sat up in bed.

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     When it was told to Jacob, “Behold, your son Joseph has come to you,” Israel collected his strength and sat up in the bed.

New European Version          .

New King James Version       And Jacob was told, “Look, your son Joseph is coming to you”; and Israel strengthened himself and sat up on the bed.

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And one declares to Jacob, and says, “Lo, your son Joseph is coming unto you;” and Israel strengthens himself, and sit upon the bed.

 

The gist of this passage: 


Genesis 48:2a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

nâgad (נָגַד) [pronounced naw-GAHD]

to make conspicuous, to make known, to expound, to explain, to declare, to inform, to confess, to make it pitifully obvious that

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect

Strong's #5046 BDB #616

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

Yaʿăqôb (יַעֲקֹב) [pronounced yah-ģuh-KOHBV]

supplanter; insidious, deceitful; to circumvent; heel; and is transliterated Jacob

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #3290 BDB #784


Translation: [One] made known to Jacob... One of Jacob’s servants (presumably) came to him and told him that Joseph had come to him.


Genesis 48:2b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

hinnêh (הִנֵּה) [pronounced hin-NAY]

lo, behold, or more freely, observe, look here, look, listen, note, take note, duly note [that]; pay attention, get this, check this out

interjection, exclamatory particle, demonstrative particle

Strong’s #2009 (and #518, 2006) BDB #243

bên (בֵּן) [pronounced bane]

son, descendant

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1121 BDB #119

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied) with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #413 BDB #39


Translation: ...and said, “Behold, your son Joseph has come to you.” The one who spoke to Jacob told him that his son Joseph had come to him.


Jacob needs to prepare himself for this.


Genesis 48:2c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

châzaq (חָזַק) [pronounced khaw-ZAHK]

to take hold [of something], to grab, to seize, to hold fast, to gain [take] possession of; to strengthen, to make strong, to support; to repair; to display strength [power]; to prevail [upon]

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil imperfect

Strong’s #2388 BDB #304

Yiserâʾêl (יִשְֹרַאֵל) [pronounced yis-raw-ALE]

God prevails; contender; soldier of God; transliterated Israel

masculine proper noun; God-given name to Jacob; and national name for the Jewish people

Strong’s #3478 & #3479 BDB #975


Translation: So Israel strengthened [himself]... Israel summoned all of his strength to sit up before his son. He could not appear to be simply lying on the bed, getting ready to die. Jacob—called Israel here—has a marvelous message to give to his grandchildren and children.


The word for strengthen here is the Hithpael imperfect of the verb châzaq (חָזַק) [pronounced khaw-ZAHK] which means, to strengthen oneself (among other things). Strong’s #2388 BDB #304. The Hithpael is the reflexive, intensive stem—so this Jacob does to himself and the intensive stem suggests that it requires great effort on his part.


The reason that I mention this verb here is, we will encounter this same verb many times in the chapters 7–14 of Exodus (9 times, actually), where it is translated to harden (in the KJV). Whereas, this is not a bad translation, as it applies to the thinking and the volition of the Pharaoh of the exodus (the subject or the object of the verb is always heart); just as Jacob strengthens his body in order to sit up and receive guests; so Pharaoh will strengthen his own resolve in opposing God (similarly, when Pharaoh has little strength left, God gives him strength—Ex. 9:12 10:20, 27 11:10 14:8—so God is not changing Pharaoh’s free will; but giving him the strength or ability to exercise his negative volition towards God). This may help to show just how important the original languages are to understanding Scripture.


Genesis 48:2d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

yâshab (יָשַב) [pronounced yaw-SHAHBV]

to remain, to stay; to dwell, to live, to inhabit, to reside; to sit

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #3427 BDB #442

ʿal (עַל) [pronounced ģahl]

upon, beyond, on, against, above, over, by, beside

preposition of relative proximity

Strong’s #5921 BDB #752

miţţâh (מִטָּה) [pronounced mit-TAW]

couch, bed; an open casket, a bier, a stretcher on which the dead are carried

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #4296 BDB #641


Translation: ...and he sat [up] on the bed. Although the verb here often means to stay, to dwell, to live; but it also means to sit, which fits with this context. The bed is where he sits up.


Jacob was obviously near the end if he could only sit up having summoned his strength. In our youth, we take for granted the physical prowess which we have.


Jacob is the patriarch; he is going to give the last blessings to his two grandsons and later to his 12 sons. Jacob, therefore, has to take control; he has to be in command of his dying body and his mind. Let me suggest to you that, during that time that Jacob has laid in bed, he has been thinking about his sons and grandsons and what to say to them.


This is a great blessing and honor for the patriarch to looks at his sons, to consider them, based upon what they had done in their lives, even thinking about their names, and projecting this out into the future.


A Privilege, a Responsibility and a Blessing: Jacob, being able and willing to do this, is at once a privilege, a responsibility and a blessing. When it comes to the exercise of your spiritual gift, the same things apply. The operation of your spiritual gift is a privilege, a responsibility and a blessing.

 

I have given the illustration several times in the past when I was a 7th grader playing football (and I was not good at many sports), so Ed Nagle, the team captain, told me to step over the goal line and he would hit me with a pass. No one thought I would be involved in any football play, so I stepped over the line, Ed, threw the ball to me, and I caught it. That was a great privilege, something which I remember 50+ years later. This is our life in the spiritual world. God wants us to go out for a pass, and he will toss that football right into our hands.

 

What we do in our spiritual lives is a responsibility. God has designed for us a way to walk, a place to be, a set of things to accomplish, and we are responsible to do these things. As a teacher, it was a great privilege to teach these young people; but it was also a responsibility. I was given specific courses and specific students, and it was my job to get with these kids and to teach them. They were my responsibility in the realm of whatever mathematics I was teaching them.

 

Finally, our lives as believers is a great blessing. We enjoy great blessings in our lives. For most believers, we get to live our lives and enjoy the lives that we lead. Our blessings can come to us in a variety of ways. However, the exercise of your spiritual gift is going to be the greatest blessing that you can enjoy in life.


Genesis 48:2 And one spoke to Jacob, and said, “Behold, your son Joseph comes to you.” And Israel strengthened himself, and sat on the bed.


The man meeting Joseph at the door and speaking to would have been one of Jacob’s servants; and the one speaking to Jacob would have been one of his servants (probably the same man).


——————————



Jacob could have been a spiritual giant like Moses or David or his grandfather Abraham. Instead, Jacob squandered most of his life. It is only during these last few years that Jacob became more oriented to life and to his purpose in life. He, in his old age, had more time to contemplate God and God's promises to him.


And so says Jacob unto Joseph, “El Shaddai appeared unto me in Luz in a land of Canaan and so He blessed me. And so He said unto me, ‘Behold I will make you fruitful and I have multiplied you. And I have given you an assembly of peoples and I have given the land the this to your seed after you, a possession of perpetuity.’

Genesis

48:3–4

Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shaddai [= God Almighty] appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and He blessed me [there]. He said to me, ‘Listen, I will make you fruitful and I will multiply you. I will make you into an assembly of peoples and I will give this land to your descendants [who come] after you, [for] an eternal possession.’

Jacob told Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me in Luz (which I named Bethel) in Canaan. God blessed me there, saying, ‘Listen carefully to My promises: I will make you prosperous and man in number. You will become an assembly of peoples in the future, and this land of Canaan I will give to your descendants who come up after you as their eternal possession.’


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says Jacob unto Joseph, “El Shaddai appeared unto me in Luz in a land of Canaan and so He blessed me. And so He said unto me, ‘Behold I will make you fruitful and I have multiplied you. And I have given you an assembly of peoples and I have given the land the this to your seed after you, a possession of perpetuity.’

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Jakob said to Joseph, El Shadai revealed Himself to me in Luz, in the land of Kenaan, and blessed me; and He said to me, Behold, I will multiply thee, and make thee great, and will set thee for an assembly of tribes, and will give this land to thy sons after thee for an everlasting inheritance.

Targum Pseudo-Jonathan     And Jakob said to Joseph: El Shadai revealed Himself to me at Luz, in the land of Kenaan, and blessed me. And He said to me, Behold, I will increase thee and multiply thee, and make thee an assemblage of tribes, and will give this land to thy sons after thee for an everlasting inheritance.

Revised Douay-Rheims         And when Joseph was come in to him, he said: God Almighty appeared to me at Luza, which is in the land of Chanaan: and he blessed me,

And he said: I will cause thee to increase and multiply, and I will make of thee a multitude of people: and I will give this land to thee, and to thy seed after thee for an everlasting possession.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Ya'aqub said to Yoseph, "El Shaddai appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me, and said to me, 'Behold, I will make you fruitful, and multiply you, and I will make of you a company of peoples, and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession.'

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Jacob said to Joseph, God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me, And he said to me, Behold, I will bless you, and multiply you, and I will make of you a multitude of peoples; and I will give this land to your descendants after you for an everlasting possession.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Jacob said to Joseph, My God appeared to me in Luza, in the land of Chanaan, and blessed me, and said to me, Behold, I will increase you, and multiply you, and will make of you multitudes of nations; and I will give this land to you, and to your seed after you, for an everlasting possession.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And Jacob said to Joseph, God, the Ruler of all, came to me in a vision at Luz in the land of Canaan, and gave me his blessing, And said to me, Truly, I will make you fertile and give you increase and will make of you a great family of nations: and I will give this land to your seed after you to be their heritage for ever.

Easy English                          Jacob said to Joseph, ‘God Almighty appeared to me at Luz. That is in Canaan. And he blessed me there. He said to me, “I am going to make good things happen to you, and give you many descendants. I will make you into a great group of people. And I will give you this land. And your descendants will have this land when you die.”

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  Then Israel said to Joseph, “God All-Powerful appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan. God blessed me there. He said to me, ‘I will make you a great family. I will give you many children and you will be a great people. Your family will own this land forever.’

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         Jacob said to Joseph, “Almighty God appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me. He said to me, ‘I will give you many children, so that your descendants will become many nations; I will give this land to your descendants as their possession forever.’”.

International Children’s B.     Then Jacob said to Joseph, “God All-Powerful appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan. God blessed me there. He said to me, ‘I will give you many children. I will make you the father of many peoples. And I will give your descendants this land forever.’

The Message                         Jacob said to Joseph, “The Strong God appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me. He said, ‘I’m going to make you prosperous and numerous, turn you into a congregation of tribes; and I’ll turn this land over to your children coming after you as a permanent inheritance.’

Names of God Bible               Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shadday appeared to me at Luz in Canaan and blessed me. He said to me, ‘I will make you fertile and increase the number of your descendants so that you will become a community of people. I will give this land to your descendants as a permanent possession.’

NIRV                                      Jacob said to Joseph, “The Mighty God appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan. He blessed me there. He said to me, ‘I am going to give you children. I will make your family very large. I will make you a community of nations. And I will give this land to your children after you. It will belong to them forever.’

New Simplified Bible              Jacob said to Joseph: »Almighty God appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me.

»He promised: ‘I will give you a large family with many descendants that will grow into a nation. I am giving you this land that will belong to you and your family from generation to generation.’« (Hebrew: olam olam) (long lasting possession)


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me in Luz in the land of Canaan. He blessed me and said to me, ‘I am about to give you many children, to increase your numbers, and to make you a large group of peoples. I will give this land to your descendants following you as an enduring possession.’

Contemporary English V.       Jacob told Joseph: God All-Powerful appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, where he gave me his blessing and promised, "I will give you a large family with many descendants that will grow into a nation. And I am giving you this land that will belong to you and your family forever."

The Living Bible                     .

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             Then Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me there. He said to me, ‘I will give you many children. I will make you the father of many peoples, and I will give your descendants this land forever.’

New Life Version                    Then Jacob said to Joseph, "The All-powerful God showed Himself to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and He brought good to me. He said to me, 'See, I will give you many children. I will make you a group of nations. And I will give this land to your children and to your children's children after you. It will belong to them forever.'

New Living Translation           .


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And [he] said to JoSeph: 'My God appeared to me in Luza in the land of CanaAn and blest me. And He said to me, {Look!} I will make you grow and increase, and I will make many nations come from you. I will also give this land to you and to your seed that comes after you, as an inheritance through the ages.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Jacob reminded Joseph, “God Almighty revealed himself to me at Luz in Canaan and blessed me. He told me, ‘Pay attention! I’m going to make you fruitful and numerous. I’m going to build you into a vast nation of people and then I’ll give this land to your descendants [Lit. descendants who come after you] for an eternal possession.’

New Advent (Knox) Bible       When the old man heard that Joseph had come to see him, he found strength to sit up in bed, and greeted him thus, The almighty God revealed himself to me at Luza in Chanaan, and gave me his blessing there. I will make thy posterity increase and multiply, he said, so that a host of nations shall spring from thee; and I will give this land to thee and to thy race after thee, to be their possession eternally. V. 2 is included for context.

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     He said to Joseph, “When I was at Luz in Canaan land, God Almighty appeared to me. He blessed me and said to me, ‘I am going to enable you to become the father of many children. You will have many descendants, and they will become the ancestors of many people-groups. And I will give this land to your descendants to possess forever.’.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Jacob was to say to Joseph: He devastating of mighty ones is to have appeared to me in Luz, on the solid grounds of Canaan, and was to well consider me, even was He to say: You being fruitful is to have increased, even am I to have set you as an assembly of people, and I am to have given these solid grounds to your seed after you, as a continual taking hold.

Conservapedia                       Jacob said to Joseph, "The All-sufficient God appeared to me at Luz in the country of Canaan, and blessed me. He said to me, "'Look at Me! I will make you fruitful, and increase your numbers, and I will make you into an assembly of peoples, and I will give this land to your descendants after you as a landholding forever.'"

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                .

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           Then was it said unto Jacob: behold, your son Joseph comes unto you. And Israel took his strength unto him, and sat up on the bed, and said unto Joseph: God almighty appeared unto me at Lus in the land of Canaan, and blessed me, and said unto me: behold, I will make you grow and will multiply you, and will make a great number of people of you, and will give this land unto you and unto your seed after you unto an everlasting possession. V. 2 is included for context.

HCSB                                     Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me. He said to me, ‘I will make you fruitful and numerous; I will make many nations come from you, and I will give this land as an eternal possession to your future descendants.’

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         And Jacob said to Joseph: God Almighty appeared unto me in Luz in the land of Canaan and he blessed me, and He said to me: Behold, I am about to make thee fruitful, and I shall multiply thee and make of thee a company of tribes; and I shall give this land to thee and to thy seed after thee as an everlasting possession.

NIV, ©2011                             Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and there he blessed me and said to me, ‘I am going to make you fruitful and increase your numbers. I will make you a community of peoples, and I will give this land as an everlasting possession to your descendants after you.’

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                Then Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shaddai appeared to me in Luz, in the land of Canaan, and blessed me.” He said to me, ‘I am going to make you fruitful and multiply you and turn you into an assembly of peoples, and I will give this land to your seed after you as an everlasting possession.’

Urim-Thummim Version         And Jacob said to Joseph, Elohim Shaddai appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me. He spoke to me saying, I will make you branch off and become many and I will make of you a company of people, and will give this land to your offspring after you for an age-lasting possession.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And Jacob said to Joseph:
El Shaddai has appeared to me in Luz, in the land of Canaan, and he has blessed me. And he said to me, here I will bear you fruit and I will multiply you and I will give to you a crowd of peoples. And I gave this land here to your seed after you, a permanent landholding.


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 And Jacob said to Joseph, God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and knelt down with goodness to me, Gen 28:13 And said to me, Behold, I am making you fruitful, and have multiplied you, and I have given you a multitude of people; and have given this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession.

New American Bible (2002)   Jacob then said to Joseph: "God Almighty appeared to me at Luz [Luz: an older name of Bethel (⇒ Genesis 28:19).] in the land of Canaan, and blessing me, he said, 'I will make you fertile and numerous and raise you into an assembly of tribes, and I will give this land to your descendants after you as a permanent possession.'

New American Bible (2011)   Jacob then said to Joseph: “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz [an older name of Bethel (28:19)] in the land of Canaan, and blessing me, he said, ‘I will make you fertile and multiply you and make you into an assembly of peoples, and I will give this land to your descendants after you as a permanent possession.’ Gn 28:12–15; 35:6.

New Jerusalem Bible             'El Shaddai appeared to me at Luz in Canaan,' Jacob told Joseph, 'and he blessed me, saying to me, "I shall make you fruitful and numerous, and shall make you into an assembly of peoples and give this country to your descendants after you, to own in perpetuity."

New RSV                               And Jacob said to Joseph, ‘God Almighty [Traditional rendering of Heb El Shaddai] appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and he blessed me, and said to me, “I am going to make you fruitful and increase your numbers; I will make of you a company of peoples, and will give this land to your offspring after you for a perpetual holding.”

Revised English Bible            Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in Canaan and blessed me; he said to me, ‘I shall make you fruitful and increase your descendants until they become a host of nations. I shall give this land to them after you as a possession for all time.’


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Ya‘akov said to Yosef, “El Shaddai appeared to me at Luz in the land of Kena‘an and blessed me, saying to me, ‘I will make you fruitful and numerous. I will make of you a group of peoples; and I will give this land to your descendants to possess forever.’

exeGeses companion Bible   And Yaaqov says to Yoseph,

El Shadday appeared to me

at Luz in the land of Kenaan and blesses me,

and says to me, Behold,

I have you bear fruit and abound you

and I give you a congregation of people;

and give this land to your seed after you

for an eternal possession.

Hebraic Roots Bible               And Jacob said to Joseph, El Shaddai (Almighty) appeared to me in Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me, and said to me, Behold, I will make you fruitful and will multiply you, and will give you a multitude of peoples. And I will give this land to your seed after you as a continual possession.

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               And Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shaddai appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and He blessed me, and said to me, ‘I will make you fertile and numerous, making of you a community of peoples; and I will assign this land to your offspring to come for an everlasting possession.’

Judaica Press Complete T.    .

Kaplan Translation                 Jacob said to Joseph, 'God Almighty once appeared to me in Luz, in the land of Canaan. He blessed me, and said to me, 'I will make you fruitful and numerous, and have you give rise to an assembly of nations. I will give this land to you and your descendants as their property forever.' Genesis 35:11,12. Also see Genesis 28:13.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Ya’akov said unto Yosef, El Shaddai appeared unto me at Luz in Eretz Kena’an, and made on me a brocha,

And said unto me, Hineni, I will make thee fruitful, and multiply thee, and I will make of thee a kehal of ammim; and will give HaAretz Hazot to thy zera after thee for an achuzzat olam (everlasting possession).

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              Then Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz [Canother name for Bethel] in the land of Canaan and blessed me there [28:19; 35:9–15]. He said to me, ‘I will ·give you many children [Lmake you fruitful and multiply you; 1:28]. I will make you ·the father [La company; an assembly] of many peoples, and I will give your ·descendants [Lseed] this land ·forever [as a permanent possession].’

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And Jacob said unto Joseph, God Almighty appeared unto me at Luz in the land of Canaan, at Bethel, where he received two special revelations, Gen. 28:13-19; Gen. 35:6-9, and blessed me, and said unto me, Behold, I will make thee fruitful and multiply thee; and I will make of thee a multitude of people, and will give this land to thy seed after thee for an everlasting possession. Thus both the patriarchal and the Messianic blessing had been given to Jacob, to be fulfilled in his descendants.

NET Bible®                             Jacob said to Joseph, “The sovereign God [Heb “El Shaddai.”] appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me. He said to me, ‘I am going to make you fruitful [Heb “Look, I am making you fruitful.”] and will multiply you. I will make you into a group of nations, and I will give this land to your descendants [The Hebrew text adds “after you,” which has not been included in the translation for stylistic reasons.] as an everlasting possession.’

Syndein/Thieme                     {Note: Jacob is dying and tells Joseph not to worry - he is saved.}

{Land Grant to Abraham Was Passed to Jacob and His Seed}

And {God} kept on saying unto me, "Behold, I will make you fruitful, and multiply you, and I will make of you a multitude of people and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession." {Note: Jacob could not possess the land forever unless he had everlasting life. He was saved.}.

The Voice                               Jacob (to Joseph): The All-Powerful God appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan many years ago and spoke His blessing over me, telling me, “I am going to make you fruitful and multiply your descendants so that you will give rise to nation after nation. I will give this land to them after you to have as their possession forever.”


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Ya'aqov [He restrains] said to Yoseph [Adding], the mighty one of Shaddai [My breasts] appeared to me in Luz [Almond], in the land of Kena'an [Lowered] and he respected me, and he said to me, here am I, making you reproduce and I will make you increase and I will give you for an assembled flock of peoples and I will give this land to your seed after you, a holdings for a distant time,...

Concordant Literal Version    And saying is Jacob to Joseph, "The El-Who-Suffices appeared to me in Luz, in the land of Canaan, and blessing me is He, and saying to me, `Behold Me making you fruitful. And I increase you, and give you to be an assembly of peoples. And I give this land to you and to your seed after you for a freehold eonian.

Context Group Version          And Jacob said to Joseph, God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and esteemed me, and said to me, Look, I will make you fruitful, and multiply you, and I will make of you a company of peoples, and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession.

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  Then said Jacob unto Joseph, GOD Almighty, appeared unto me in Luz in the land of Canaan,—and blessed me; and said unto me—Behold me! about to make thee fruitful, so will I multiply thee, and give thee to become a multitude of peoples,—so will I give this land to thy seed after thee, as an age-abiding possession.

English Standard Version      .

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me. And He said to me, ‘I will make you fruitful and multiply you, and I will make you into a multitude of people and will give this land to your descendants after you for an everlasting possession.’

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          Jacob said to Joseph, God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me, and said to me, ‘Behold, I will make you fruitful, and multiply you, and I will make of you a company of peoples, and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession’.

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Jacob says unto Joseph, “God Almighty has appeared unto me, in Luz, in the land of Canaan, and blesses me, and says unto me, Lo, I am making you fruitful, and have multiplied you, and given you for an assembly of peoples, and given this land to your seed after you, a possession age-during.

 

The gist of this passage:     Jacob tells Joseph that God appeared to him in Bethel (Luz); and what God said to him.


Genesis 48:3a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

Yaʿăqôb (יַעֲקֹב) [pronounced yah-ģuh-KOHBV]

supplanter; insidious, deceitful; to circumvent; heel; and is transliterated Jacob

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #3290 BDB #784

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415

ʾÊl (אֵל) [pronounced ALE]

God, god, mighty one, strong, hero; transliterated El

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #410 BDB #42

Shadday (שַדַּי) [pronounced shahd-DAH-ee]

the many-breasted one; and is generally translated Almighty, the Almighty One; Omnipotent [One]

proper noun

Strong’s #7706 BDB #994

Together, these two nouns are often transliterated ʾEl Shaddai.

râʾâh (רָאָה) [pronounced raw-AWH]

to be seen, to be visible; to let oneself be seen, to appear; to present oneself; to be provided [cared] for (i.e., looked after)

3rd person masculine singular, Niphal perfect

Strong's #7200 BDB #906

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

Lûwz (לוּז) [pronounced looze]

possibly almond-tree, almond wood; transliterated Luz

proper noun; location

Strong’s #3870 BDB #531

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Kenaʿan (כְּנַעַן) [pronounced keNAH-ģahn]

which possibly means merchant and is transliterated Canaan

masculine proper noun; territory

Strong’s #3667 BDB #488


Translation: Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shaddai [= God Almighty] appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan... Jacob tells Joseph of his meeting God in Luz (which Jacob renamed Bethel). The purpose is for Jacob to pass on these promises to his seed, which included Joseph and his children (all of whom had come before Jacob). So Joseph is hearing these words as are his two sons.


 

The Net Bible on El Shaddai

The name אֵל שַדַּי (’el shadday, “El Shaddai”) has often been translated “God Almighty,” primarily because Jerome translated it omnipotens (“all powerful”) in the Latin Vulgate. There has been much debate over the meaning of the name. For discussion see W. F. Albright, “The Names Shaddai and Abram,” JBL 54 (1935): 173-210; R. Gordis, “The Biblical Root sdy-sd,” JTS 41 (1940): 34-43; and especially T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 69-72. Shaddai/El Shaddai is the sovereign king of the world who grants, blesses, and judges. In the Book of Genesis he blesses the patriarchs with fertility and promises numerous descendants. Outside Genesis he both blesses/protects and takes away life/happiness. The patriarchs knew God primarily as El Shaddai (Exod 6:3). While the origin and meaning of this name are uncertain (see discussion below) its significance is clear. The name is used in contexts where God appears as the source of fertility and life. In Gen 17:1-8 he appeared to Abram, introduced himself as El Shaddai, and announced his intention to make the patriarch fruitful. In the role of El Shaddai God repeated these words (now elevated to the status of a decree) to Jacob (35:11). Earlier Isaac had pronounced a blessing on Jacob in which he asked El Shaddai to make Jacob fruitful (28:3). Jacob later prayed that his sons would be treated with mercy when they returned to Egypt with Benjamin (43:14). The fertility theme is not as apparent here, though one must remember that Jacob viewed Benjamin as the sole remaining son of the favored and once-barren Rachel (see 29:31; 30:22-24; 35:16-18). It is quite natural that he would appeal to El Shaddai to preserve Benjamin’s life, for it was El Shaddai’s miraculous power which made it possible for Rachel to give him sons in the first place. In 48:3 Jacob, prior to blessing Joseph’s sons, told him how El Shaddai appeared to him at Bethel (see Gen 28) and promised to make him fruitful. When blessing Joseph on his deathbed Jacob referred to Shaddai (we should probably read “El Shaddai,” along with a few Hebrew mss, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the LXX, and Syriac) as the one who provides abundant blessings, including “blessings of the breast and womb” (49:25). (The direct association of the name with “breasts” suggests the name might mean “the one of the breast” [i.e., the one who gives fertility], but the juxtaposition is probably better explained as wordplay. Note the wordplay involving the name and the root שָדַד, shadad, “destroy”] in Isa 13:6 and in Joel 1:15.) Outside Genesis the name Shaddai (minus the element “El” [“God”]) is normally used when God is viewed as the sovereign king who blesses/protects or curses/brings judgment. The name appears in the introduction to two of Balaam’s oracles (Num 24:4, 16) of blessing upon Israel. Naomi employs the name when accusing the Lord of treating her bitterly by taking the lives of her husband and sons (Ruth 1:20-21). In Ps 68:14; Isa 13:6; and Joel 1:15 Shaddai judges his enemies through warfare, while Ps 91:1 depicts him as the protector of his people. (In Ezek 1:24 and 10:5 the sound of the cherubs’ wings is compared to Shaddai’s powerful voice. The reference may be to the mighty divine warrior’s battle cry which accompanies his angry judgment.) Finally, the name occurs 31 times in the Book of Job. Job and his “friends” assume that Shaddai is the sovereign king of the world (11:7; 37:23a) who is the source of life (33:4b) and is responsible for maintaining justice (8:3; 34:10-12; 37:23b). He provides abundant blessings, including children (22:17-18; 29:4-6), but he can also discipline, punish, and destroy (5:17; 6:4; 21:20; 23:16). It is not surprising to see the name so often in this book, where the theme of God’s justice is primary and even called into question (24:1; 27:2). The most likely proposal is that the name means “God, the one of the mountain” (an Akkadian cognate means “mountain,” to which the Hebrew ש ַד, shad, “breast”] is probably related). For a discussion of proposed derivations see T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 70-71. The name may originally have depicted God as the sovereign judge who, in Canaanite style, ruled from a sacred mountain. Isa 14:13 and Ezek 28:14, 16 associate such a mountain with God, while Ps 48:2 refers to Zion as “Zaphon,” the Canaanite Olympus from which the high god El ruled. (In Isa 14 the Canaanite god El may be in view. Note that Isaiah pictures pagan kings as taunting the king of Babylon, suggesting that pagan mythology may provide the background for the language and imagery.).

From https://bible.org/netbible/index.htm?gen44.htm (footnote); accessed January 17, 2017.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


I think the idea here of referring to God as El Shaddai indicates that Jacob is fully aware that he spoke to the True God, the Revealed God, the God Who Created the Universe.


Also, I believe that Jacob is not telling Joseph this for the first time, but reminding him of what he has told Joseph in the past.


Gen. 48:3a Jacob said to Joseph, “El Shaddai [= God Almighty] appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan...


Jacob recalls being blessed by God at Luz (Bethel)—this is the first time that God spoke to Jacob. That Jacob says this suggests that Luz, which he renamed Bethel, was still Luz in Jacob’s mind. The actual changing of that name in the popular culture apparently took a significant amount of time.


It is my theory that, originally, the book of Genesis was all transmitted orally. Although there was a great respect for the text (I believe that it was memorized from generation to generation), it was quite easy to change the name of a location to help the understanding of the audience (who would have been the sons of those speaking Footnote ). These words may have been spoken when sacrifices were offered. Footnote


There is a great Jewish tradition which reaches back thousands of years, where the words of God are spoken in a group setting (as was done in the synagogues), or paraphrased (as they are when Jews celebrate the Passover Footnote ). Let me suggest to you that this tradition of speaking the Word of God goes back prior to the synagogues or the Seder. Let me further suggest to you that synagogues were built for the expressed purpose of reading the Word of God publically, something which was already taking place.

 

The Jewish Encyclopedia tells us: The origin of the synagogue, in which the congregation gathered to worship and to receive the religious instruction connected therewith, is wrapped in obscurity. By the time it had become the central institution of Judaism (no period of the history of Israel is conceivable without it), it was already regarded as of ancient origin, dating back to the time of Moses.

 

Yet, in the same paragraph, they write: The synagogue as a permanent institution originated probably in the period of the Babylonian captivity, when a place for common worship and instruction had become necessary. Footnote There may not be a contradiction here; something like synagogues goes back to the time of Moses (the Tabernacle); and the synagogue as a well-defined institution probably goes back to the Babylonia captivity.


Genesis 48:3b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

bârake (בָּרַ) [pronounced baw-RAHKe]

to invoke God, to praise, to celebrate, to adore, to bless [God]; to bless [men], to invoke blessings; to bless [as God, man and other created things], therefore to cause to prosper, to make happy; to salute anyone [with a blessing]; to curse

3rd person masculine singular, Piel imperfect

Strong’s #1288 BDB #138

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

him, it; he; untranslated mark of a direct object; occasionally to him, toward him

sign of the direct object affixed to a 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #853 BDB #84


Translation: ...and He blessed me [there]. When Jacob was first traveling through Luz, he was escaping the harm that would have surely come to him from his brother Esau, who hated him at the time (and with some reason to do so).


Here, Jacob recalls when God appeared to him when Jacob first entered into a stage of maturity in Gen. 35. It is likely that Jacob recounted other instances of God appearing to him. He is now occupied with the person of Jesus Christ, something, unfortunately that did not occur a century ago. Had that happened, most of Genensis would have been about Jacob ratehr than about Noah, Abraham and Joseph. Jacob is holding onto God's promises.


Jacob was traveling through Luz to leave the land of Canaan—the land given to his father and to his grandfather; the land the Jacob was himself to inherit.


Jacob left Canaan in Gen. 28 (20 chapters ago!); and what he experienced is recorded in Gen. 28:10–16 Jacob left Beersheba and went toward Haran. And he came to a certain place and stayed there that night, because the sun had set. Taking one of the stones of the place, he put it under his head and lay down in that place to sleep. And he dreamed, and behold, there was a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven. And behold, the angels of God were ascending and descending on it! And behold, the LORD stood above it and said, "I am the LORD, the God of Abraham your father and the God of Isaac. The land on which you lie I will give to you and to your offspring. Your offspring shall be like the dust of the earth, and you shall spread abroad to the west and to the east and to the north and to the south, and in you and your offspring shall all the families of the earth be blessed. Behold, I am with you and will keep you wherever you go, and will bring you back to this land. For I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you." Then Jacob awoke from his sleep and said, "Surely the LORD is in this place, and I did not know it." (ESV; capitalized)


Upon his return to the Land of Promise, Jacob also traveled to Bethel. Gen. 35:1–15 God said to Jacob, "Arise, go up to Bethel and dwell there. Make an altar there to the God who appeared to you when you fled from your brother Esau." So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, "Put away the foreign gods that are among you and purify yourselves and change your garments. Then let us arise and go up to Bethel, so that I may make there an altar to the God who answers me in the day of my distress and has been with me wherever I have gone." So they gave to Jacob all the foreign gods that they had, and the rings that were in their ears. Jacob hid them under the terebinth tree that was near Shechem. And as they journeyed, a terror from God fell upon the cities that were around them, so that they did not pursue the sons of Jacob. And Jacob came to Luz (that is, Bethel), which is in the land of Canaan, he and all the people who were with him, and there he built an altar and called the place El-bethel, because there God had revealed himself to him when he fled from his brother. And Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, died, and she was buried under an oak below Bethel. So he called its name Allon-bacuth. God appeared to Jacob again, when he came from Paddan-aram, and blessed him. And God said to him, "Your name is Jacob; no longer shall your name be called Jacob, but Israel shall be your name." So He called his name Israel. And God said to him, "I am God Almighty: be fruitful and multiply. A nation and a company of nations shall come from you, and kings shall come from your own body. The land that I gave to Abraham and Isaac I will give to you, and I will give the land to your offspring after you." Then God went up from him in the place where he had spoken with him. And Jacob set up a pillar in the place where he had spoken with him, a pillar of stone. He poured out a drink offering on it and poured oil on it. So Jacob called the name of the place where God had spoken with him Bethel. (ESV; capitalized)


The second description is a lot closer to what we read here. Let me suggest that the Gen. 35 passage is most accurate; whereas, what we read in Gen. 48:4 is more or less of a summary of God’s blessings to Jacob.


Genesis 48:3 And Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me.


Genesis 48:4a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied); with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong's #413 BDB #39

hinnêh (הִנֵּה) [pronounced hin-NAY]

lo, behold, or more freely, observe, look here, look, listen, note, take note; pay attention, get this, check this out

interjection, exclamatory particle, demonstrative particle with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #2009 (and #518, 2006) BDB #243

With the 1st person singular suffix, hinnêh literally means behold me; however, it is an idiom which seems to mean, here I am, right here, yes sir. This is when it is in direct response to a question. This phrase can also be used to place the hearer in the midst of the action as experienced by the speaker. This could also introduce the 1st person as the subject of the next verb.

pârâh (פָּרָה) [pronounced paw-RAW]

causing one to become fruitful, making fruitful; increasing with offspring

Hiphil participle with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #6509 (& #6500) BDB #826

The NET Bible: The participle following הִנֵּה (hinneh) has the nuance of a certain and often imminent future. Footnote

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

râbâh (רָבָה) [pronounced rawb-VAWH]

to make [do] much; to multiply, to increase; to give much; to lay much; to have much; to make great; many [as a Hiphil infinitive construct]

1st person singular, Hiphil perfect; with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #7235 BDB #915

The NET Bible: The perfect verbal form with vav consecutive carries on the certain future idea. Footnote


Translation: He said to me, ‘Listen, I will make you fruitful and I will multiply you. God promises to make Jacob fruitful, which means that he will sire many children; and that they would in turn also sire many children. Multiplying Jacob seems to mean the same thing, but it does not. Not only will Jacob have many children, but they will live to child-bearing age and they will also have many children. Therefore, all of Jacob’s line will increase in number.


All of this requires logistical grace. That is, Jacob must be fed, housed and clothed in order for this stuff to come to pass.


Genesis 48:4b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

nâthan (נָתַן) [pronounced naw-THAHN]

to give, to grant, to place, to put, to set; to make

1st person singular, Qal perfect; with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #5414 BDB #678

All of the BDB meanings for the Qal stem of nâthan are as follows: 1) to give, put, set; 1a) (Qal); 1a1) to give, bestow, grant, permit, ascribe, employ, devote, consecrate, dedicate, pay wages, sell, exchange, lend, commit, entrust, give over, deliver up, yield produce, occasion, produce, requite to, report, mention, utter, stretch out, extend; 1a2) to put, set, put on, put upon, set, appoint, assign, designate; 1a3) to make, constitute.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

qâhâl (קָהָל) [pronounced kaw-HAWL]

an organized assembly, a called convocation; this is not just a crowd, but people who were assembled for a reason

masculine singular construct

Strong's #6951 BDB #874

ʿammîym (עַמִּים) [pronounced ģahm-MEEM]

peoples, nations; tribes [of Israel]; relatives of anyone

masculine plural collective noun

Strong’s #5971 BDB #766


Translation: I will make you into an assembly of peoples... This is an interesting promise to be given to Jacob, as we would have expected the only people to come from him would be the Jewish race.


Genesis 48:4c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

nâthan (נָתַן) [pronounced naw-THAHN]

to give, to grant, to place, to put, to set; to make

1st person singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #5414 BDB #678

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #776 BDB #75

zôʾth (זֹאת) [pronounced zoth]

here, this, this one; thus; possibly another

feminine of singular zeh; demonstrative pronoun, adverb; with the definite article

Strong’s #2063 (& 2088, 2090) BDB #260

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

zeraʿ (זֶרַע) [pronounced ZEH-rahģ]

a seed, a sowing; an offspring, progeny, descendant; posterity

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #2233 BDB #282

ʾachar (אַחַר) [pronounced ah-KHAHR]

after, following, behind; afterwards, after that; another

preposition/adverb with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #310 BDB #29

ʾăchûzzâh (אֲחֻזָּה) [pronounced uh-khooz-ZAW]

possession [of land, slaves, etc.], land possession; inheritance

feminine singular construct

Strong’s #272 BDB #28

ʿôwlâm (עוֹלָם) [pronounced ģo-LAWM]

properly what is hidden [time]; of [in] times past, from ancient time, old, antiquity, long duration, everlasting, eternal, forever, perpetuity; for future time, futurity; of the world, worldly

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #5769 BDB #761

The NET Bible: The Hebrew word אֲחֻזָּה (’akhuzzah), translated “possession,” describes a permanent holding in the land. It is the noun form of the same verb (אָחַז, ’akhaz) that was used for the land given to them in Goshen (Gen 47:27). Footnote


Translation: ...and I will give this land to your descendants [who come] after you, [for] an eternal possession.’ The land specifically would not go to Jacob but to his descendants. This was the same promise that God gave to Abraham and Isaac.


God had promised Abraham, Isaac and Jacob to give the land to their descendants as a possession forever and that their descendants would be like the sand in the sea. All three patriarchs would have been better off to have seized that promise with all of their might; to believe that promise and to live as thought they believed that promise.


Application: With respect to our own selves—the Bible is filled with promised made to us as believers, either directly or by implication. It would behoove us to grab onto these promises and hold onto them and to believe them and to conduct our lives with faith in these promises. It is actually a youthful step in one's spritiual walk, but a positve step toward spiritual maturity and one that very few Christians ever make. In fact, about the only thing Christians seem to know how to do is, when they get in trouble or they are under pressure, they may attend church a little more faithfully and they will pray like the dickens for God to remove their discipline and/or pressure.


Genesis 48:4 And He said to me, ‘Behold, I will make you fruitful and multiply you. And I will make of you a multitude of people, and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession.’


Jacob is speaking to Joseph. Joseph’s sons are there, but sitting behind and on both sides of Joseph. Jacob recounts what God said to him; as these promises continue to the many generations of Jacob that will follow. These promises of God were first made to Abraham (Gen. 13:16 22:17), then to Isaac (Gen. 26:4) and finally to Jacob (Gen. 28:3, 14 32:12 35:11). Apparently, Jacob, of the patriarchs, needed the most reassurance and guidance.


In Egypt, at this time, there were probably 80–150 descendants from Jacob (remember, they began with 70 + their wives). So, there was not a multitude of people when Jacob said these things to Joseph. I have suggested early on that the sons of Jacob gathered and heard the book of Genesis spoken orally by Jacob, Joseph, Judah and possibly even Leah. They were replaced by sons and grandsons as time progressed.


Let me further suggest that, Jacob when he spoke most of the book of Genesis, that Egyptians also came to here him speak, and were moved and affected by these words of God. This would explain the great respect that Jacob received in Egypt (which we have not studied yet, but which will be quite remarkable).


There will be early indications of God’s promises beginning to be fulfilled in Ex. 1:7 (And the children of Israel increased and multiplied, and became numerous and grew exceedingly strong, and the land multiplied them.—ESV).


Genesis 48:4 And He [God] said to me [Jacob], ‘Behold, I will make you fruitful and multiply you. And I will make of you a multitude of people, and will give this land to your seed after you for an everlasting possession.’


What we have here is not a direct quote from a previous passage of Genesis, but a summation of the many times God gave Jacob this promise.


——————————



And now two of your sons, the ones being born to you In Egypt, to me they [are]—Ephraim and Manasseh, as Reuben and Simeon are to me. And your offspring that you have sired after them, to you they are; upon a name of their brothers they are called in their inheritance.

Genesis

48:5–6

Therefore, your two sons—Ephraim and Manasseh—the ones being born in Egypt—they [are] mine, just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. But your offspring that you will sire after them, they are yours. They will be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

Therefore, your two sons, the ones who were born to you in Egypt—Ephraim and Manasseh—they belong to me and to my line, just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. However, any offspring that you sire after them, they are yours, and they will be known by your name regarding their inheritence.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And now two of your sons, the ones being born to you In Egypt, to me they [are]—Ephraim and Manasseh, as Reuben and Simeon are to me. And your offspring that you have sired after them, to you they are; upon a name of their brothers they are called in their inheritance.

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And now thy two sons which were born to thee in the land of Mizraim, before my coming to thee into Mizraim, are mine; Ephraim and Menashe shall be as Reuben and Shimeon before me. And the children whom thou mayest beget after them, who shall be thine, after the name of their brethren they shall be called in their inheritance [Sam. Vers. "in their divisions."].

Targum Pseudo-Jonathan     And now, thy two sons who have been born to thee in the land of Mizraim before I came to thee into Mizraim are mine; Ephraim and Menasheh as Reuben and Shimeon shall be reckoned unto me. And thy children whom thou mayest beget after them shall be thine; by the name of their brethren shall they be called in their inheritance.

Revised Douay-Rheims         So your two sons who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came hither to you, shall be mine: Ephraim and Manasses shall be reputed to me as Ruben and Simeon. But the rest whom you shall have after them, shall be yours, and shall be called by the name of their brethren in their possessions.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you into Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh, even as Reuben and Simeon, will be mine. Your issue, who you become the father of after them, will be yours. They will be called after the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you into the land of Egypt, are mine; as Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine. But the children that you begot after them shall be yours, and shall be called after the name of their brothers when they come into their inheritance.

Septuagint (Greek)                Now then your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt, before I came to you into Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasse, as Ruben and Symeon they shall be mine. And the children which you shall beget hereafter, shall be in the name of their brethren; they shall be named after their inheritances.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And now your two sons who came to birth in Egypt before I came to you here, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine, in the same way as Reuben and Simeon are. And any other offspring which you have after them, will be yours, and will be named after their brothers in their heritage.

Easy English                          Now you have 2 sons. They were born before I came to Egypt. They will be like my own sons. People will think of Ephraim and Manasseh as my sons, as they think of Reuben and Simeon as my sons. Any children born to you after them will be your own children. They will inherit the land of their brothers. Ephraim and Manasseh will inherit along with Jacob’s other sons.

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  Now you have two sons. These two sons were born here in the country of Egypt before I came. Your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, will be like my own sons. They will be like Reuben and Simeon to me. So these two boys will be my sons. They will share in everything I own. But if you have other sons, they will be your sons. But they will also be like sons to Ephraim and Manasseh—that is, in the future, they will share in everything that Ephraim and Manasseh own.

God’s Word                         “So your two sons, who were born in Egypt before I came here, are my sons. Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine just as Reuben and Simeon are. Any other children you have after them will be yours. They will inherit the land listed under their brothers’ names.

International Children’s B.     Your two sons were born here in Egypt before I came. They will be counted as my own sons. Ephraim and Manasseh will be my sons just as Reuben and Simeon are my sons. But if you have other children, they will be your own. But their land will be part of the land given to Ephraim and Manasseh.

The Message                         I’m adopting your two sons who were born to you here in Egypt before I joined you; they have equal status with Reuben and Simeon. But any children born after them are yours; they will come after their brothers in matters of inheritance. I want it this way because, as I was returning from Paddan, your mother Rachel, to my deep sorrow, died as we were on our way through Canaan when we were only a short distance from Ephrath, now called Bethlehem.” V. 7 is included for context.

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      “Now then, two sons were born to you in Egypt. It happened before I came to you here. They will be counted as my own sons. Ephraim and Manasseh will belong to me, in the same way that Reuben and Simeon belong to me. Any children born to you after them will belong to you. Any territory they receive will come from the land that will be given to Ephraim and Manasseh.

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Now, your two sons born to you in the land of Egypt before I arrived in Egypt are my own. Ephraim and Manasseh are just like Reuben and Simeon to me. Your family who is born to you after them are yours, but their inheritance will be determined under their brothers’ names.

Contemporary English V.       Then Jacob went on to say: Joseph, your two sons Ephraim and Manasseh were born in Egypt, but I accept them as my own, just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Any children you have later will be considered yours, but their inheritance will come from Ephraim and Manasseh.

The Living Bible                     And now, as to these two sons of yours, Ephraim and Manasseh, born here in the land of Egypt before I arrived, I am adopting them as my own, and they will inherit from me just as Reuben and Simeon will. But any other children born to you shall be your own, and shall inherit Ephraim’s and Manasseh’s portion from you.

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    Now your two sons, who were born to you in Egypt before I came to you here, are mine. Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine, as Reuben and Simeon are. The children born to you after them will be yours. They will be called by the names of their brothers in their share of what the family is to receive.

New Living Translation           “Now I am claiming as my own sons these two boys of yours, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born here in the land of Egypt before I arrived. They will be my sons, just as Reuben and Simeon are. But any children born to you in the future will be your own, and they will inherit land within the territories of their brothers Ephraim and Manasseh.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Now, your two sons, Ephraim and ManasSeh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came here, are my [sons] the same as ReuBen and SimeOn are my [sons]. And any children that you have from this point on will share in the names of their brothers. Because, [the lands that they will] inherit will be named after them.

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        You have two sons who were born to you in Egypt before I came to be with you, whom I now take as my own. Ephraim and Manasseh are mine, just as Reuben and Simeon are. Your descendants [Lit. descendants who come after you] are to be reckoned as yours, but are to be referred to among the names of their brothers in their respective [The Heb. lacks respective] inheritances.

New Advent (Knox) Bible       Thy two sons were born to thee in Egypt, before my coming, but they shall be counted as sons of mine; Ephraim and Manasses shall take rank with Ruben and Simeon. Whatever children thou shalt beget after this shall be thine, not mine, and they shall hold whatever possession they hold under the title of these brothers of theirs.

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     And now I will consider that your two sons, who were born to you here in Egypt before I came here, will ◂belong to me/be as though they are my sons►. Ephraim and Manasseh will be my as though they were my sons, and they will inherit my possessions, just like my sons Reuben and Simeon and the others will. If you later become the father of any more children, they will not be considered to be my children, but as my grandchildren, and in Canaan they will receive as part of what they inherit some of the same land that is in the territory that their brothers Ephraim and Manasseh will inherit.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, being born on these solid grounds, while yet I am to come to Egypt are to be as Reuben and Simeon. The offsprings that are to have been bore forth to you afterwards, were to be called, according to the name of their brothers, are they to inherit.

Conservapedia                       Now your two sons who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, will be my sons. They, Ephraim and Manasseh, will be as much mine as are Reuben and Simeon Any descendants that you generate after them, will belong to you, and will be call after the name of their brothers in their allotment." Which is to say, allotment in the context of probate.

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                But now for your two sons, who have been born to you in the land of the Mitzeraim before I came to you in Mitzer ; — let then Ephraim and Manasseh be mine, as Reuben and Simeon are mine. But your children whom you have begot after them they shall be yours. They shall not be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           Now therefore your two sons Manasse and Ephraim which were born unto you before I came to you, into Egypt, shall be mine: even as Ruben and Simeon shall they be unto me.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            And now, your two sons who were born to you in the land of Egypt before my coming to you in Egypt, are mine. Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine as Reuben and Simeon [are]. And your children whom you father after them shall be yours. By the name of their brothers they shall be called, with respect to their inheritance.

H. C. Leupold                         And now thy two sons that were born unto thee in the land of Egypt before my coming to thee to Egypt, they shall belong to me: Ephraim and Manasseh shall belong to me as Reuben and Simeon do. And thy descendants whom thou shalt beget after them shall belong to thee. After the name of one of their brethren shall they be designated in their inheritance.

NIV, ©2011                             “Now then, your two sons born to you in Egypt before I came to you here will be reckoned as mine; Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine, just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Any children born to you after them will be yours; in the territory they inherit they will be reckoned under the names of their brothers.

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                So now, your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, they are mine. Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine, just like Reuben and Simeon. Any descendent of yours whom you father after them will be yours; they will be identified by the names of their brothers for their inheritance.

Urim-Thummim Version         And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, which were born to you in the land of Egypt before I traveled into Egypt, are mine; as Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine. Now your other offspring, which you gender after them, will be yours, but will be assigned the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

Wikipedia Bible Project          .


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  From now on your two sons who were born in Egypt, before I came to you here, are mine! Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Only the children born after them will be yours and the land they inherit shall be known by the names of Ephraim and Manasseh.

The Heritage Bible                 And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before my coming to you in Egypt, are mine; as Reuben and Simeon they are mine. And your family, whom you will beget after them, are yours, and shall be called after the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

New American Bible (2002)   Your two sons, therefore, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I joined you here, shall be mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine as much as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Progeny born to you after them shall remain yours; but their heritage shall be recorded in the names of their two brothers.

New American Bible (2011)   So now your two sons who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I joined you here, shall be mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine as much as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Progeny born to you after them shall remain yours; but their heritage shall be recorded in the names of their brothers.

New Jerusalem Bible             Now your two sons, born to you in Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, shall be mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be as much mine as Reuben and Simeon. But with regard to the children you have had since them, they shall be yours, and they shall be known by their brothers' names for the purpose of their inheritance.

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            Now,” Jacob went on, “your two sons, who were born in Egypt before I came to join you here, will be counted as my sons; Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine as Reuben and Simeon are. But the children born to you after them will be counted as yours; in respect of their tribal territory they will be reckoned under their elder brothers” names.


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; Efrayim and M’nasheh will be as much mine as Re’uven and Shim‘on are. The children born to you after them will be yours, but for purposes of inheritance they are to be counted with their older brothers.

exeGeses companion Bible   And now your two sons,

Ephrayim and Menash Sheh,

birthed to you in the land of Misrayim

until I came to you into Misrayim, they are mine;

as Reu Ben and Shimon, they are mine:

and your kindred, which you birthed after them,

they are yours:

call them after the name of their brothers

in their inheritance.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               .

Judaica Press Complete T.    Now, your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, shall be mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine no less than Reuben and Simeon. But progeny born to you after them shall be yours; they shall be recorded instead of their brothers in their inheritance.

Kaplan Translation                 'Now, the two sons who were born to you in Egypt before I came here shall be considered as mine. Ephraim and Manasseh shall be just like Reuben and Simeon to me. Any children that you have after them, however, shall be considered yours. They shall inherit only through their [older] brothers.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And now thy two banim, Ephrayim and Menasheh, which were born unto thee in Eretz Mitzrayim before I came unto thee into Mitzrayim, are mine; like Reuven and Shimon, they shall be mine.

And thy moledet, which are born to thee after them, shall be thine, and shall be called after the shem of their achim in their nachalah.

The Scriptures 1998              “And now, your two sons, Ephrayim and Menashsheh, who were born to you in the land of Mitsrayim before I came to you in Mitsrayim, are mine – as Re’uĕn and Shimʽon, they are mine.

“Your offspring whom you shall bring forth after them are yours, and let them be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance.


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                Now your two sons [Ephraim and Manasseh], who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine [that is, adopted as my heirs and sons as surely], as Reuben and Simeon are my sons. But other sons who were born to you after them shall be your own; they shall be called by the names of their [two] brothers in their inheritance.

The Expanded Bible              Your two sons, who were born here in Egypt before I came, will be counted as my own sons. Ephraim and Manasseh will be my sons just as Reuben and Simeon are my sons [Chis two oldest children]. But if you have other children, they will be your own, and ·their land will be part of the land given to Ephraim and Manasseh [Lthey will be recorded according to the name of their brothers in regard to their inheritance].

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And now thy two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, which were born unto thee in the land of Egypt before I came unto thee into Egypt, are mine; as Reuben and Simeon they shall be mine. It is significant that in this formal statement of adoption the name of Ephraim is set before that of Manasseh, the birthright thus being changed. The divine blessing of promise, of which Jacob was the bearer, empowered him to adopt these two grandsons and to give them equal rights with his oldest sons, designate their descendants as two fully recognized tribes among the children of Israel. And thy issue which thou begettest after them shall be thine, and shall be called after the name of their brethren in their inheritance; they should not form a third tribe, but should be included in those of Ephraim and Manasseh, though their names were entered in the genealogical tables, Num. 26:28-37; 1Chron. 7:14-19, Through this adoption of his oldest sons on the part of Jacob, Joseph was given the right of the firstborn in his inheritance, 1Chron. 5:2. By this disposition of the inheritance Jacob incidentally honored Rachel.

NET Bible®                             “Now, as for your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, they will be mine. Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine just as Reuben and Simeon are. Any children that you father [Or “you fathered.”] after them will be yours; they will be listed [Heb “called” or “named.”] under the names of their brothers in their inheritance.

Syndein/Thieme                     "And now your two sons, Ephraim {the younger} and Manasseh, {notice that Jacob reversed the order! You never mention the youngest first because the oldest is the heir! So . . . who is Jacob saying will be the heir? Ephraim} who were born unto you in the land of Egypt before I came unto you into Egypt, are mine. As Reuben {oldest} and Simeon, they shall be mine {in the analogy Ephraim is 'as to Reuben' indicating that both are the heirs}."

{Note: See Revelation 2:4-8. The evangelists of the Tribulation will come from almost all of the Tribes of Israel. But, Ephraim and Manasseh are listed as the Tribes of Israel as if they were 'his sons like Reuben and Simeon'. SideNote: the tribe of Dan was excluded - RBT says because 'Dan was like a serpent' meaning that the Jewish Dictator of the Tribulation would come from the tribe of Dan.}

And your {Joseph's} issue/seed/children, which you sired after them, shall be yours {not as 'sons of Jacob' but grandchildren and so forth}, and shall be called after the name of their brethren in their inheritance."

The Voice                               Jacob (to Joseph): So Joseph, your two sons who were born to you in Egypt before I came here are mine. I claim Ephraim and Manasseh as my own, just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. As for any children you father after them, you may regard them as your own. When it comes time for your other children to gain their inheritances, they will be given land within the regions granted to their brothers, Ephraim and Manasseh.


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and now, your two sons are being brought forth to you in the land of Mitsrayim [Troubles] before I came to you unto Mitsrayim [Troubles], they belong to me, Ephrayim [Double fruitfulness] and Menasheh [Causing to overlook], like Re'uven [See a son] and Shimon [Heard], they will belong to me, and your kindred which you caused to bring forth after them belong to you, they will exist in addition to the title of their brothers, they will be called out in their inheritance,...

Concordant Literal Version    And now your two sons, born to you in the land of Egypt previous to my coming to you to Egypt, mine are they, Ephraim and Manasseh. As Reuben and as Simeon, shall they become mine. Yet your kindred, whom you beget after them, are yours. Come shall they to be called by the name of their brothers in allotting their allotment.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      And now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine, as Reuben and Simeon are. And the children that you fathered after them shall be yours. They shall be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         “Now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; as Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine. Any children you have after them will be yours and will be called by the names of their brothers in their inheritance.

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     Now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine, as Reuben and Simeon are. But your offspring that have been born after them shall be yours; they shall be called by the names of their brothers in their inheritance.

New European Version          Now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you into Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh, even as Reuben and Simeon, will be mine. Your issue, whom you become the father of after them, will be yours. They will be called after the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And now your two sons, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh will be mine, as Reuben and Simeon are. And the children that you fathered after them will be yours. They will be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance.

 

The gist of this passage:     Joseph’s two sons will be as if they are Jacob’s sons. Any subsequent sons of Joseph will assume a part of the inheritance of their older brothers.

5-6

What Jacob says here is a little tricky, so hang on for the explanation.


Genesis 48:5a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʿattâh (עַתָּה) [pronounced ģaht-TAWH]

now, at this time, already

adverb of time

Strong’s #6258 BDB #773

When followed by an imperative or an interrogative, we + the adverb ʿattâh mean and so, thus, things being so, therefore, now therefore, now then, in conclusion. Sometimes, the concept of time is lost when this combination is used to incite another.

shenêy (שְנֵי) [pronounced shen-Ā]

two, two of, a pair of, a duo of; both of

dual numeral construct

Strong’s #8147 BDB #1040

bânîym (בָּנִים) [pronounced baw-NEEM]

sons, descendants; children; people; sometimes rendered men; young men, youths

masculine plural noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #1121 BDB #119

yâlad (יָלַד) [pronounced yaw-LAHD]

those being born, those receiving birth

masculine plural, Niphal participle

Strong’s #3205 BDB #408

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Mitserayim (מִצְרַיִם) [pronounced mits-RAH-yim]

double straights; transliterated Mizraim; also Egypt, Egyptians

masculine singular, proper noun

Strong’s #4714 BDB #595

No clue why Owens lists this as a Qal infinitive construct; that is a typo.

ʿad (עַד) [pronounced ģahd]

as far as, even to, up to, until

preposition of duration or of limits

Strong’s #5704 BDB #723

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

Qal infinitive construct and the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied); with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #413 BDB #39

Mitserayim (מִצְרַיִם) [pronounced mits-RAH-yim]

double straights; transliterated Mizraim; also Egypt, Egyptians

masculine singular, proper noun; directional hê

Strong’s #4714 BDB #595

The directional hê (properly, the directive hê) is the âh (הַ] ending to a noun, usually found after a verb of motion. This is called the directive hê or the hê locale, which often indicates direction and puts somewhat of an adverbial spin on the noun. Essentially, it answers the question where? The pronunciation of the word does not change. The directional hê indicates the direction in which something moves. It is often used with the noun heaven and the most literal rendering in the English would be heavenward. We can also indicate the existence of the hê directional by supplying the prepositions to or toward.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 1st person singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

Often the lâmed preposition has a suffix, although it strictly translates as to me, it indicates ownership and might be translated I have.

hûwʾ (הוּא) [pronounced hoo]

he, it; him, himself as a demonstrative pronoun: that, this (one); same

3rd person masculine singular, personal pronoun; sometimes the verb to be, is implied

Strong’s #1931 BDB #214

The NET Bible: Jacob is here adopting his two grandsons Manasseh and Ephraim as his sons, and so they will have equal share with the other brothers. They will be in the place of Joseph and Levi (who will become a priestly tribe) in the settlement of the land. See I. Mendelsohn, “A Ugaritic Parallel to the Adoption of Ephraim and Manasseh,” IEJ (1959): 180-83. Footnote

ʾEpherayim (אֶפְרַיִם) [pronounced ef-RAH-yim]

to bear fruit, to be fruitful; double ash heap transliterated Ephraim

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #669 BDB #68

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

Menashsheh (מְנַשֶּה) [pronounced mehn-ahsh-SHEH]

causing to forget; transliterated Manasseh

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #4519 BDB #586


Translation: Therefore, your two sons—Ephraim and Manasseh—the ones being born in Egypt—they [are] mine,... Joseph’s sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, they will be considered as Jacob’s sons. Essentially, Jacob is telling Joseph that they are his double portion. They will be two tribes which proceed from Jacob.


Genesis 48:5b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

kaph or ke (כְּ) [pronounced ke]

like, as, just as; according to, after; about, approximately; combined with an infinitive, it can also take on the meaning as, often, when, as soon as

preposition of comparison, resemblance or approximation

No Strong’s # BDB #453

Reʾûwbên (רְאוּבֵן) [pronounced roo-BANE]

behold a son; transliterated Reuben

masculine singular proper noun

Strong’s #7205 BDB #910

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

Shimeʿôwn (שִמְעוֹן) [pronounced shime-ĢOHN]

hearing, one who hears and is transliterated Simeon

masculine proper noun

Strong’s #8095 BDB #1035

hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW]

to be, is, was, are; to become, to come into being; to come to pass

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #1961 BDB #224

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 1st person singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

Sometimes the lâmed preposition has a 1st person singular suffix, and, although it strictly translates as to me, it indicates ownership and might be translated I have.


Translation: ...just as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Just as Reuben and Simeon are considered to be Jacob’s sons, so it will be Ephraim and Manasseh. These will become 4 tribes from Jacob. Reuben and Simeon will be two of these tribes; and Ephraim and Manasseh will be two of these tribes.


Jacob is making this statement when the family of Jacob is rather small.


This is the double-portion given over to Joseph (normally, the double-portion is awarded to the eldest brother).


What is being said here is that these two young men will be tribes of their own, placed with the other eleven tribes just as though they were on an equal footing with Reuben and Simeon.


Jacob is not claiming possession of these children in such a way that he is keeping them at his home from hereon out, but he is adopting them as per the ancient custom of adoption. They will be considered tribes in their own right as though they had come directly from Jacob's loins. It is a simple matter of they are a part of the tribes of Israel. How did Jacob know this? He was occupied with the person of Jesus Christ and these things came to him.


Application: How would we learn such things as these? We need to live in the Word. Every believer needs approximately an hour of God's Word every day. For most believers, this seems like such an imposition. Having been under that kind of a ministry for two decades let me report to you that the only imposition which I had was when I went my own willful way in opposition to God and God's plan; the only time that I wasted in Bible class were the times I did not listen as well as I should have. Those days were among the best years of my life, as are these with even more time spent exploring God's Word.


Just so there is no misunderstanding, you will not have the prophetic ability of Jacob, where you can look at your two grandsons and tell their future; but, you will be able to read historical trends.


What will happen in the future is, we will follow out the lines of Ephraim and Manasseh when we come to 1Chronicles; we do not follow out the line of Joseph. The sons of Manasseh are covered in 1Chron. 7:14–19 and the sons of Ephraim are covered in 1Chron. 7:20–29. So, in Scripture, these lines are laid out just as the lines of the other 11 tribes are laid out. 1Chron. 7 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).


Genesis 48:5 And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who are born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you into Egypt, are mine; like Reuben and Simeon, they will be mine.


Now Jacob is speaking very directly to Joseph, telling him that his two sons now belong to Jacob, just as Reuben and Simeon are his sons. Even though Ephraim and Manasseh were born to Joseph in the land of Egypt, they will belong to Jacob, just as Reuben and Simeon, his first children born, belong to him. Jacob is adopting them (as per the ancient-world understanding of adoption). They are of the same flesh; they are of the same line. These promises of God will extend to Ephraim and Manasseh.


As Joseph’s double portion, Ephraim and Manasseh will become primary tribes or clans. Ephraim and Manasseh will be considered among the patriarchs. They will be treated as if they were direct sons of Jacob, placed on an equal footing with Reuben and Simeon. This does not mean that Jacob is going to take them into his house or anything like that. This does not mean that Jacob is their father now and Joseph is not. Remember, Jacob is about to die, so he is not taking on some new responsibility with these young men. Adoption means that Ephraim and Manasseh would become tribes side-by-side the tribes of Reuben, Simeon, Levi, etc.


In the ancient world, sometimes a king would get getting old, and he looks at his sons and thinks to himself, “How did these idiots proceed from my loins? Making any one of them king would be a great mistake and my name will ever be associated with that mistake.” That same king might have a faithful servant, one who has served him from his youth. This servant is young, strong, intelligent; and would make a perfect future king. So the king adopts him. The servant might by 40 years old; but this adoption would be the first step in making the servant king, after the passing away of the present king.


Genesis 48:6a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

môwledeth (מוֹלְדֶת) [pronounced mohle-DETH]

birth, origin, native; kindred, family; progeny, [female] offspring, children; circumstances of birth

feminine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #4138 BDB #409

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced uh-SHER]

that, which, when, who, whom; where; in that, in which, in what

relative pronoun; sometimes the verb to be is implied

Strong's #834 BDB #81

yâlad (יָלַד) [pronounced yaw-LAHD]

to cause a woman to bring forth; to have children; to impregnate a woman; to make [the earth] fruitful; to create; to sire, to father

3rd person masculine singular, Hiphil perfect

Strong’s #3205 BDB #408

ʾachar (אַחַר) [pronounced ah-KHAHR]

after, following, behind; afterwards, after that; another

preposition/adverb with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #310 BDB #29

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

When the lâmed preposition has a 2nd person masculine singular suffix, it means you have, even though it strictly translates as to you.

hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW]

to be, is, was, are; to become, to come into being; to come to pass

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #1961 BDB #224


Translation: But your offspring that you will sire after them, they are yours. If Joseph has any more children; or if Ephraim and Manasseh have children, then they will be considered to be Joseph’s.


Genesis 48:6b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʿal (עַל) [pronounced ģahl]

upon, beyond, on, against, above, over; on the ground of, because of, according to, on account of, on behalf of, with, by, besides, in addition to, to, toward, together with, in the matter of, concerning, as regards to

preposition of relative proximity

Strong’s #5921 BDB #752

shêm (שֵם) [pronounced shame]

name, reputation, character; fame, glory; celebrated; renown; possibly memorial, monument

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #8034 BDB #1027

ʾachîym (אַחִים) [pronounced awhk-EEM]

brothers, kinsmen, close relatives; tribesmen; fellow-countrymen

masculine plural noun with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong's #251 BDB #26

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

nachălâh (נַחֲלָה) [pronounced nah-khuh-LAW]

inheritance, possession, property, heritage

feminine singular noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #5159 BDB #635

The NET Bible: This means that any subsequent children of Joseph will be incorporated into the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh. Footnote


Translation: They will be called by the name of their brothers in their inheritance. These other children will be known by the name of their brothers—that is, by the name of Ephraim and Manasseh—in their inherence.


So, when it comes to inheritance, Ephraim and Manasseh stand shoulder to shoulder with Reuben and Simeon, as heads of full and complete tribes.


We will never speak of the tribes of any other sons of Joseph. When dealing with the 12 (actually, 13) tribes of Israel, Ephraim and Manasseh will stand side-by-side Reuben and Simeon (metaphorically speaking).


Genesis 48:6 And your issue [lit., children, offspring, lineage], which you father after them, will be yours, and will be called after the name of their brothers in their inheritance.


Many, many years ago, when I began to do these lessons in Genesis, I chose the Modern King James Version; and that is the version which I have used throughout these 500+ lessons (with some modifications; I have added in quotation marks and names in brackets when the identification of a speaker is not given). Most of the time, the MKJV is a good translation; however, I personally find the ESV or the NKJV to be better translations, overall. Therefore, there are many times when I need to further explain the translation.


This verse is a tad bit confusing, so let me explain. If Joseph had additional children, they would be his, but their inheritance would be as a part of Ephraim’s and Manasseh’s inheritance. Let’s say that Joseph had the son Joey. Footnote Joey would not be a new tribe, like Ephraim and Manasseh; he would not head a primary tribe, like Ephraim or Manasseh. And, in the future, when the land of promise is divided up, and Ephraim is given some of the land and Manasseh is given some of the land, those people descended from Joey will live either with the people of Ephraim or Manasseh.


——————————


Many of the less precise translations connected v. 7 to the previous 2 verses (see the Good News Bible below).


And I in my coming from Paddan, died upon me Rachel in a land of Canaan, in the way, in a still a distance of earth to go Ephrath-ward. And so I will bury her there on a way of Ephrath—she [is] Bethlehem.”

Genesis

48:7

When I came out from Paddan, Rachel, [your mother,] died in the land of Canaan, on the road, a little ways to go towards Ephrath. So I buried her there on the road of Ephrath—that [is], Bethlehem.”

When I came out of Paddan, your mother Rachel died, in the land of Canaan, along the road with a little ways to go to Ephrath. So I buried her there on this road, in Bethlehem.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And I in my coming from Paddan, died upon me Rachel in a land of Canaan, in the way, in a still a distance of earth to go Ephrath-ward. And so I will bury her there on a way of Ephrath—she [is] Bethlehem.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And I, in my coming from Padan, Rahel died by me in the land of Kenaan, in the way, while as yet there was a space of ground to come unto Ephrath. And I buried her there, by the way to Ephrath, which is Bethlehem.

Targum Pseudo-Jonathan     And I beseech thee to bury me with my fathers. Rahel died by me suddenly in the land of Kenaan, while there was yet much ground to come to Ephrath; nor could I carry her to bury her in the Double Cave, but I buried her there, in the way of Ephrath which is Bethlechem.

Revised Douay-Rheims         .

Latin Vulgate                          For, when I came out of Mesopotamia, Rachel died from me in the land of Chanaan in the very journey, and it was springtime: and I was going to Ephrata, and I buried her near the way of Ephrata, which by another name is called Bethlehem.

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        As for me, when I came from Paddan, Rachel died by me in the land of Canaan in the way, when there was still some distance to come to Ephrath, and I buried her there in the way to Ephrath (the same is Beitlechem)."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And as for me, when I was coming from Padan-aram, Rachel died at my side in the land of Canaan on the way, within the distance of three or four miles from the entrance to Ephrath; and I buried her there on the road to Ephrath; the same is Bethlehem.

Septuagint (Greek)                And as for me, when I came out of Mesopotamia of Syria, Rachel, your mother, died in the land of Chanaan, as I drew night to the horse-course of Chabratha of the land of Chanaan, so as to come to Ephratha; and I buried her in the road of the course; this is Bethlehem.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And as for me, when I came from Paddan, death overtook Rachel on the way, when we were still some distance from Ephrath; and I put her to rest there on the road to Ephrath, which is Beth-lehem.

Easy English                          .

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  .

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         Jacob continued, “Joseph, your two sons, who were born to you in Egypt before I came here, belong to me; Ephraim and Manasseh are just as much my sons as Reuben and Simeon. If you have any more sons, they will not be considered mine; the inheritance they get will come through Ephraim and Manasseh. I am doing this because of your mother Rachel. To my great sorrow she died in the land of Canaan, not far from Ephrath, as I was returning from Mesopotamia. I buried her there beside the road to Ephrath.” (Ephrath is now known as Bethlehem.) Vv. 5–6 are included for context.

International Children’s B.     When I came from Northwest Mesopotamia, Rachel died in the land of Canaan. We were traveling toward Ephrath. This made me very sad. I buried her there beside the road to Ephrath.” (Today Ephrath is Bethlehem.)

The Message                         .

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      As I was returning from Paddan, Rachel died. It made me very sad. She died in the land of Canaan while we were still on the way. We weren’t very far away from Ephrath. So I buried her body there beside the road to Ephrath.”

New Simplified Bible              »Your mother Rachel died in Canaan after we left northern Syria and before we reached Bethlehem. I had to bury her along the way.«


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           .

Contemporary English V.       Unfortunately, your mother Rachel died in Canaan after we had left northern Syria and before we reached Bethlehem. And I had to bury her along the way.

The Living Bible                     For your mother, Rachel, died after only two children when I came from Paddan-aram, as we were just a short distance from Ephrath, and I buried her beside the road to Bethlehem.”

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             When I came from Northwest Mesopotamia, Rachel died in the land of Canaan, as we were traveling toward Ephrath. This made me very sad, and I buried her there beside the road to Ephrath.” (Today Ephrath is Bethlehem.)

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           .


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          'And as for me; After I left Assyrian MesoPotamia, your mother RachEl died in the land of CanaAn during the evening, near the ChabRatha racetrack, as we were coming to EphRatha (or BethLehem). So I buried her beside the road at the racetrack of BethLehem.'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        .

New Advent (Knox) Bible       It was when I was on my way back from Mesopotamia that I lost Rachel, there in Chanaan, while we were on our journey, in spring time [‘In the spring, he journeyed’; the Hebrew text here has a different meaning, ‘It was still some way for him to travel’.], and when I reached Ephrata I buried her there, by the road which leads to Ephrata; Bethlehem is another name they call it by.

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     Many years ago, as I was returning from Paddan-Aram/Mesopotamia, your mother Rachel died in Canaan land, while we were still traveling, not far from Ephrath town. So I buried her body there alongside the road to Ephrath (which is now called Bethlehem).”


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   As I am to come from Padan, Rachel is to have died on the solid grounds of Canaan, on the way, yet a distance of the solid grounds to come to Ephrath. I was to bury her there on the way to Ephrath. (It is to be Bethlehem.)

Conservapedia                       "Now about me: when I came from Padan, Rachel died by my side in the land of Canaan, on the road, still a little distance away from Ephrath. I buried her there on the road to Ephrath--I mean, Bethlehem."

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                " When I came from Padan, Rachel died from me in the land of Canan, on the journey, in Kibrath-artz, near the pass of Ephratha, and I buried her there by the road at Ephratha."

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And after I came from Mesopotamia, Rahel died upon my hand in the land of Canaan, by the way: when I had but a fields breadth to go unto Ephrat. And I buried her there in the way to Ephrat which is now called Bethlehem.

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         But as for me, when I was coming from Paddan then Rachel died to my great grief in the land of Canaan during the journey when we were still a stretch removed from Ephrathah; and I buried her there on the Ephrathah road—also called Bethlehem.

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                “Now as for me, when I came from Paddan, to my sorrow Rachel died along the way, in the land of Canaan, while we were still a distance from entering Ephrath. And I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (that is, Bethlehem).”

Urim-Thummim Version         And when I came from Padan, Rachel died by me in the land of Canaan during the journey, when we were still a distance from Ephrath: and I buried her near the roadway to Ephrath; the same is Bethlehem.

Wikipedia Bible Project          And as I was coming from Paddan, Rachel died on me in the land of Canaan, on the way, with still a way to cover, as I was coming on Ephrat; and I buried her there on the path to Ephrat, in Beth-Lachem (Bethlehem).


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 .

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   I do this because, when I was returning from Paddan, your mother Rachel died, to my sorrow, during the journey in Canaan, while we were still a short distance from Ephrath; and I buried her there on the way to Ephrath [now Bethlehem].” Since her early death prevented Rachel from bearing more than two sons, Jacob feels justified in treating her two grandsons as if they were her own offspring. Gn 35:19.

New Jerusalem Bible             'When I was on my way from Paddan, to my sorrow death took your mother Rachel from me in Canaan, on the journey while only a short distance from Ephrath. I buried her there on the road to Ephrath -- now Bethlehem.

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           “Now as for me, when I came from Paddan, Rachel died suddenly, as we were traveling through the land of Kena‘an, while we were still some distance from Efrat; so I buried her there on the way to Efrat (also known as Beit-Lechem).”

exeGeses companion Bible   And as for me, when I came from Padan,

Rachel died by me in the land of Kenaan in the way

when there was still a bit of land to come to Ephrath:

and I entombed her there

in the way of Ephrath - Beth Lechem.

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               I [do this because], when I was returning from Paddan, Rachel died, to my sorrow, while I was journeying in the land of Canaan, when still some distance short of Ephrath; and I buried her there on the road to Ephrath”—now Bethlehem.

Judaica Press Complete T.    .

Kaplan Translation                 'When I was coming from Padan, [your mother] Rachel died on me. It was in Canaan, a short distance before we came to Ephrath. I buried her there along the road to Ephrath (Bethlehem).' See Genesis 35:16-19.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And as for me, when I came from Padan, Rachel died by me in Eretz Kena’an in the way, when there was yet but a space of land to go unto Ephratah; and I buried her there by the derech Ephrat; the same is Beit-Lechem.

The Scriptures 1998              “And I, when I came from Paddan, Raḥĕl died beside me in the land of Kenaʽan on the way, when there was but a little distance to go to Ephrath. And I buried her there on the way to Ephrath, that is Bĕyth Leḥem.”


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                .

The Expanded Bible              When I came from northwestern Mesopotamia [LPaddan], Rachel died in the land of Canaan, as we were traveling toward Ephrath [35:16, 19]. This made me very sad, and I buried her there beside the road to Ephrath.” (Today Ephrath is Bethlehem.)

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    And as for me, when I came from Padan, that is, Mesopotamia, Rachel died by me, she died by his side, sharing with him the toil and the hardships of the pilgrim life, in the land of Canaan in the way, while they were on the journey, when yet there was but a little way to come unto Ephrath; and I buried her there in the way of Ephrath; the same is Bethlehem, as the author adds by way of explanation. There was some compensation to Jacob in the fact that at least three tribes among the children of Israel would trace their ancestry to Rachel, his beloved wife. Thus her remembrance was kept sacred in Israel.

NET Bible®                             But as for me, when I was returning from Paddan, Rachel died – to my sorrow [Heb “upon me, against me,” which might mean something like “to my sorrow.”] – in the land of Canaan. It happened along the way, some distance from Ephrath. So I buried her there on the way to Ephrath” (that is, Bethlehem).

Syndein/Thieme                     .

The Voice                               Jacob (to Joseph): When I left Paddan, your mother Rachel died on our journey in the land of Canaan. We were not far from Ephrath, so I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (which is also known as Bethlehem).


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and I, I came from Padan [Field], Rahhel [Ewe] died upon me in the land of Kena'an [Lowered], in the road while a short distance coming unto Ephrat [Fruitful] and I buried her there in the road of Ephrat [Fruitful], she is Beyt-Lehhem [House of bread],...

Concordant Literal Version    And I, at my coming from Padan, Syria, Rachel, your mother, died by me in the land of Canaan in the way, while still some distance overland to come to Ephrath. And I entombed her there on the way to Ephrath.(It is now Bethlehem.

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      As for me, when I came from Paddan, to my sorrow Rachel died in the land of Canaan on the way, when there was still some distance to go to Ephrath, and I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (that is, Bethlehem)."

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    And I, when I came from Padan, Rachel died on me in the land of Canaan in the way, with only a little way to come to Ephrath. And I buried her there in the way to Ephrath, it being Bethlehem.

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          .

New King James Version       .

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  .

World English Bible                As for me, when I came from Paddan, Rachel died beside me in the land of Canaan on the way, when there was still some distance to come to Ephrath, and I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (also called Bethlehem).”

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             “And I—in my coming in from Padan- Aram Rachel has died by me in the land of Canaan, in the way, while yet a kibrath of land to enter Ephrata, and I bury her there in the way of Ephrata, which is Bethlehem.”

 

The gist of this passage:     When Jacob had returned from Paddan-aram, and was in the land, his wife Rachel died and he had to bury her in Bethlehem.


Genesis 48:7a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though; as well as

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾânîy (אָנִי) [pronounced aw-NEE]

I, me; in answer to a question, it means I am, it is I

1st person singular, personal pronoun

Strong’s #589 BDB #58

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

Qal infinitive construct and the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, of, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

Paddân (פַּדָּן) [pronounced pahd-DAWN]

to extend, a plateau; garden, field; transliterated Paddan, Padan

proper singular noun/location

Strong’s #6307 BDB #804

mûwth (מוּת) [pronounced mooth]

to die; to perish, to be destroyed; to be put to death; to die prematurely [by neglect of wise moral conduct]

3rd person feminine singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #4191 BDB #559

ʿal (עַל) [pronounced ģahl]

upon, beyond, on, against, above, over, by, beside

preposition of relative proximity with the 1st person singular suffix

Strong’s #5921 BDB #752

The NET Bible: Heb “upon me, against me,” which might mean something like “to my sorrow.”  Footnote

Râchêl (רָחֵל) [pronounced raw-KHALE]

ewe and is transliterated Rachel

feminine proper noun

Strong's #7354 BDB #932

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular construct

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Kenaʿan (כְּנַעַן) [pronounced keNAH-ģahn]

which possibly means merchant and is transliterated Canaan

masculine proper noun; territory

Strong’s #3667 BDB #488


Translation: When I came out from Paddan, Rachel, [your mother,] died in the land of Canaan,... Jacob recounts the death of Joseph’s mother. When Jacob exited Paddan-aram, after spending 20 years working for his Uncle Laban, Jacob had enough and took his wives out of there.


However, along the way, his favorite wife, Rachel, died when giving birth to Benjamin, who is Joseph’s full brother.


Interestingly enough, I would have included the words your mother; but Jacob did not (insofar as we know).


Genesis 48:7b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

dereke (דֶּרֶ) [pronounced DEH-reke]

way, distance, road, path; journey, course; direction, towards; manner, habit, way [of life]; of moral character

masculine singular noun

Strong's #1870 BDB #202

With the bêyth preposition, this means in the way, along the way [road], near the road, by the way, on [your] journey.

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, at, by, near, on, with, before, against, by means of, among, within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

ʿôwd (עוֹד) [pronounced ģohd]

still, yet, again, besides, in addition to, even yet

adverb

Strong’s #5750 BDB #728

With the bêyth preposition, ʿôwd means while, while yet, while [it is] still; while [it is] yet, in the time that; within.

kiberâh (כִּבְרָה) [pronounced kihb-RAW]

distance, measure, length

feminine singular construct

Strong’s #3530 BDB #460

ʾerets (אֶרֶץ) [pronounced EH-rets]

earth (all or a portion thereof), land, territory, country, continent; ground, soil; under the ground [Sheol]

feminine singular noun

Strong's #776 BDB #75

Together, these 4 words are translated .

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

bôwʾ (בּוֹא) [pronounced boh]

to come in, to come, to go in, to go, to enter, to advance; to attain

Qal infinitive construct

Strong’s #935 BDB #97

ʾEpherâthâh (אֶפְרָתָה) [pronounced ehfe-RAW-thaw]

ash heap; a place of fruitfulness; transliterated Ephrathah

proper singular noun; location or person; with the directional hê

Strong’s #672 BDB #68

The directional hê (properly, the directive hê) is the âh (הַ] ending to a noun, usually found after a verb of motion. This is called the directive hê or the hê locale, which often indicates direction and puts somewhat of an adverbial spin on the noun. Essentially, it answers the question where? The pronunciation of the word does not change. The directional hê indicates the direction in which something moves. It is often used with the noun heaven and the most literal rendering in the English would be heavenward. We can also indicate the existence of the hê directional by supplying the prepositions to or toward.


Translation: ...on the road, a little ways to go towards Ephrath. Jacob describes exactly where this all took place. The family was on the road heading down toward Ephrath, and they were not too far from there.


Genesis 48:7c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

qâbar (קָבַר) [pronounced kaw-BAHR]

to bury, to heap up a mound

1st person singular, Qal imperfect; with the 3rd person feminine singular suffix

Strong’s #6912 BDB #868

shâm (שָם) [pronounced shawm]

there; at that time, then; therein, in that thing

adverb of place

Strong’s #8033 BDB #1027

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

dereke (דֶּרֶ) [pronounced DEH-reke]

way, distance, road, path; journey, course; direction, towards; manner, habit, way [of life]; of moral character

masculine singular noun

Strong's #1870 BDB #202

With the bêyth preposition, this means in the way, along the way [road], near the road, by the way, on [your] journey.

ʾEpherâth (חּאֶפְרָת) [pronounced ehfe-RAWTH]

ash heap; a place of fruitfulness; transliterated Ephrath

proper singular noun; location or person

Strong’s #672 BDB #68

hîyʾ (הִיא) [pronounced hee]

she, it; also used as a demonstrative pronoun: that, this (one)

3rd person feminine singular, personal pronoun; sometimes the verb is, is implied

Strong’s #1931 BDB #214

Bêyth Lechem (לֶחֶם בֵּית) [pronounced bayth-LEH-khem]

house of bread and is transliterated Bethlehem

proper noun, location

Strong’s #1035 BDB #111


Translation: So I buried her there on the road of Ephrath—that [is], Bethlehem.” Jacob had to bury Rachel there, not far from Bethlehem.


This verse may seem to be sort of thrown in here for no reason. So, several translations tie this to the previous passage, which makes a great deal of sense. The New American Bible (2002) Jacob then said to Joseph: "God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessing me, he said, 'I will make you fertile and numerous and raise you into an assembly of tribes, and I will give this land to your descendants after you as a permanent possession.' Your two sons, therefore, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I joined you here, shall be mine; Ephraim and Manasseh shall be mine as much as Reuben and Simeon are mine. Progeny born to you after them shall remain yours; but their heritage shall be recorded in the names of their two brothers. I do this because, when I was returning from Paddan, your mother Rachel died, to my sorrow, during the journey in Canaan, while we were still a short distance from Ephrath; and I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (that is, Bethlehem)." (Gen. 48:3–7) Why Jacob has chosen to treat Joseph’s sons as two separate tribes is, he had limited children by Rachel—who was clearly his right woman and his most loved wife. So, in part, he honors her by giving Joseph the double portion. Interestingly enough, in the next chapter, when it comes to Benjamin, Jacob will not have much good to say.


Here, Jacob recalls a portion of his life. The association which is being drawn here is that Rachel was his favorite of his wives. In fact, there was no comparison and Jacob, had it been God's plan, would have been content to have married Rachel only. In his adoption of Manasseh and Ephraim, Rachel now has three tribal representaitives: Benjamine, Ephraim and Manasseh.


Genesis 48:7 And as for me, when I came from Padan, Rachel died beside me in the land of Canaan in the way, when there was still but a little way to come to Ephrath. And I buried her there in the way of Ephrath; it is Bethlehem.”


Jacob speaks of his wife, Rachel; who was Joseph’s mother. Joseph would have been quite young, at this point. Rachel gave birth to Benjamin, Joseph’s younger brother, and she died while giving birth. Rachel only had 2 sons.


Joseph, as we have studied, has stood head and shoulders above his other brothers in terms of his personal integrity. The primary difference in his upbringing is, Rachel would have been much more directly involved Joseph’s upbringing. Leah had 6 sons and a daughter; the personal servants had 2 sons each; and Rachel had only one son that she raised. Jacob would have also been more involved in raising this son, as this is the woman he most loved. Apparently, Joseph was greatly benefitted by this unique upbringing among his brothers. In addition, we must take into account Joseph’s obvious positive volition toward the truth. Positive volition towards the truth goes hand-in-hand with exposure to the truth of God. In other words, if you will respond positively to divine truth, then God will provide it to you; if you have no real interest in the truth, then an omniscient God is not impelled by His Own perfect character to provide truth to you.


——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Jacob Places Ephraim (the Younger Son) Before Manasseh


And so sees Israel sons of Joseph; and so he says, “Who [are] these?”

Genesis

48:8

When Israel saw Joseph’s sons, he said, “Who [are] these?”

When Israel saw Joseph’s sons, he said, “Who are these young men?”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so sees Israel sons of Joseph; and so he says, “Who [are] these?”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Israel saw the sons of Joseph, and said, Who are these?

Targum Pseudo-Jonathan     And Israel looked at the sons of Joseph and said, From whom are these born to thee?

Revised Douay-Rheims         .

Latin Vulgate                          Then seeing his sons, he said to him: Who are these?

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Yisrael saw Yoseph's sons, and said, "Who are these?"

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And when Israel saw Josephs sons, he said to him, Who are these?

Septuagint (Greek)                And when Israel saw the sons of Joseph, he said, Who are these to you?

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             Then Israel, looking at Joseph's sons, said, Who are these?

Easy English                          Joseph brought Ephraim and Manasseh to Jacob. And Jacob asked, ‘Who are these?’

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  .

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

The Message                         .

Names of God Bible               .

NIRV                                      Israel saw Joseph’s sons. He asked, “Who are they?”

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           .

Contemporary English V.       Jacob was very old and almost blind. He did not recognize the two boys, and so he asked Joseph, "Who are these boys?"

The Living Bible                     Then Israel looked over at the two boys. “Are these the ones?” he asked.

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           Then Jacob looked over at the two boys. “Are these your sons?” he asked.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And when IsraEl noticed JoSeph's sons, he asked: 'Who are they?'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        Joseph Seeks Blessings for His Sons

Just then, Israel saw Joseph’s sons and asked, “Who are these?”

New Advent (Knox) Bible       Then he saw Joseph’s two sons there, and asked, Who are these?

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     .


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Isra-el was to perceive Joseph's sons, and he was to intend of them.

Conservapedia                       .

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                Then Israel looked at the sons of Joseph, and said, " These are mine ! "

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           And Israel beheld Josephs sons and said: what are these?

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         .

NIV, ©2011                             .

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         And Israel observed Joseph's sons and said, who are these?

Wikipedia Bible Project          And Israel feared the sons of Joseph, and said "Who are they?"


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  When Israel saw Joseph’s sons he said, “Who are these?”

The Heritage Bible                 .

New American Bible (2002)   .

New American Bible (2011)   .

New Jerusalem Bible             .

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible           Then Isra’el noticed Yosef’s sons and asked, “Whose are these?”

exeGeses companion Bible   And Yisra El sees the sons of Yoseph, and says,

Who are these?

Hebraic Roots Bible               .

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               Noticing Joseph’s sons, Israel asked, “Who are these?”

Judaica Press Complete T.    .

Kaplan Translation                 Israel saw Joseph's sons. 'Who are these?' he asked.

Orthodox Jewish Bible           And Yisroel beheld Bnei Yosef, and said, Who are these?

The Scriptures 1998              .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

The Amplified Bible                When Israel [who was almost blind] saw Joseph’s sons, he said, “Who are these?”

The Expanded Bible              Then Israel saw Joseph’s sons and said, “Who are these boys?”

The Geneva Bible                  .

Kretzmann’s Commentary    Verses 8-22

The Blessing upon Ephraim and Manasseh

And Israel beheld Joseph's sons and said, Who are these? The eyes of Jacob being dim with age, he had not noticed the presence of the two young men till now.

NET Bible®                             .

Syndein/Thieme                     {Verses 8-22: Jacob takes Three Looks at Life - 3) Looks Upward}

And Israel {Jacob} beheld Joseph's sons, and kept on saying, "Who are these?"

The Voice                               Just then Israel noticed Joseph’s sons.

Jacob: And who are these?


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  ...and Yisra'el [He turns El] saw the sons of Yoseph [Adding] and he said, who are these,...

Concordant Literal Version    And seeing is Israel the sons of Joseph. And saying is he, "Who are these?

Context Group Version          .

Darby Translation                  .

Emphasized Bible                  .

English Standard Version      .

English Standard V. – UK       .

Evidence Bible                       .

Green’s Literal Translation    .

H. C. Leupold                         .

Jack Ballinger’s translation    .

Modern English Version         .

Modern KJV                           .

NASB                                     .

New European Version          .

New King James Version       Then Israel saw Joseph’s sons, and said, “Who are these?”

Owen's Translation                .

Benner’s Mechanical Trans.  .

Stuart Wolf                             .

Third Millennium Bible            .

Updated Bible Version 2.11   .

A Voice in the Wilderness      .

Webster’s Bible Translation  And Israel beheld Joseph's sons, and said, Who are these?

World English Bible                .

Young's Literal Translation     .

Young’s Updated LT             And Israel sees the sons of Joseph, and says, “Who are these?”

 

The gist of this passage:     Israel sees Joseph’s sons and asks, “Who are they?”


Genesis 48:8a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

râʾâh (רָאָה) [pronounced raw-AWH]

to see, to look, to look at, to view, to behold; to observe; to perceive, to understand, to learn, to know

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #7200 BDB #906

Yiserâʾêl (יִשְֹרַאֵל) [pronounced yis-raw-ALE]

God prevails; contender; soldier of God; transliterated Israel

masculine proper noun; God-given name to Jacob; and national name for the Jewish people

Strong’s #3478 & #3479 BDB #975

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

untranslated generally; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

bânîym (בָּנִים) [pronounced baw-NEEM]

sons, descendants; children; people; sometimes rendered men; young men, youths

masculine plural construct

Strong’s #1121 BDB #119

Yôwçêph (יוֹסֵף) [pronounced yoh-SAYF]

he adds, he increases; transliterated Joseph

proper masculine noun

Strong’s #3130 BDB #415


Translation: When Israel saw Joseph’s sons,... This statement strikes me as rather weird, because Jacob just got through talking about Ephraim and Manasseh a few seconds ago (in the context of this chapter).


Genesis 48:8b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think; to command; to promise; to explain; to intend; to decide; to answer

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

mîy (מִי) [pronounced mee]

who, whom; whose, whomever; what; occasionally rendered how, in what way

pronominal interrogative; the verb to be may be implied

Strong’s #4310 BDB #566

ʾêlleh (אֵלֶּה) [pronounced ALE-leh]

these, these things; they

demonstrative plural adjective with the definite article (often the verb to be is implied)

Strong's #428 BDB #41


Translation: ...he said, “Who [are] these?” Obviously, the first thing the reader wants to do is yell, “Those are Ephraim and Manasseh, the two kids you have been just talking about.”


Genesis 48:8 When Israel saw Joseph’s sons, he said, “Who [are] these?” The Hebrew is simple; but how do we understand it, given the surrounding text?

“Who [are] these?” What does this mean?

1.      Is Jacob eliciting information which he did not have? Had he been speaking of Joseph’s sons previously, but did not see them due to his poor eyesight?

2.      Did Jacob see the boys, but forget who was who?

3.      Is Jacob setting them up for a blessing? Joseph gives them the names and then Jacob launches into a blessing for each boy.

4.      Joseph came in to Jacob alone, and Jacob spoke to him first about his sons; then the two sons enter, having been called by Joseph, and Jacob sees the sons and says this.

5.      The first part of this chapter is the most important, and so it comes first. However, in time, these things were said at the end of the chapter.

6.      What Jacob said in vv. 3–6 took place at another time and is inserted here.

7.      

The number of options here is quite surprising. At this point, I could not give you the nuance or exact way to take this. However, this will be cleared up for us.

Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Jacob is nearly blind by cataracts (my assumption) and all he can barely see through the haze of his lenses. He likely realizes who they are, although he cannot see them well. Joseph has brought his children before his father for his father to pronounce a blessing upon them.


Genesis 48:8 And Israel beheld Joseph's sons, and said, “Who are these?”


Jacob is not confused at this moment, looking at these two sons, and saying, “Who are these kids?” He is not suffering from a senior moment. He just named them previously in v. 5. Therefore, we would understand this to be a part of the ritual of the end-of-life blessing. Joseph will formally give the names of his sons.


——————————


In retrospect, I probably should have placed vv. 8–9 together.


And so says Joseph unto his father, “My sons these [are] whom has given to me Elohim in here.” And so he said, “Bring them please unto me and I will bless them.”

Genesis

48:9

Joseph said to his father, “These [are] my sons whom Elohim has given me here.” Then Jacob [lit., he] said, “Please bring them to me and I will bless them.”

Joseph said to his father, “These are my sons whom God has given to me here in Egypt.” Then Jacob said, “Please bring them to me and I will bless them.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says Joseph unto his father, “My sons these [are] whom has given to me Elohim in here.” And so he said, “Bring them please unto me and I will bless them.”

Dead Sea Scrolls                   .

Targum of Onkelos                And Joseph said to his father, They are my sons whom the Lord hath given me here. And he said, Bring them now near to me, that I may bless them.

Targum Pseudo-Jonathan     And Joseph answered his father, They are my sons which the Word of the Lord gave me according to this writing, according to which I took Asenath the daughter of Dinah thy daughter to be my wife.

And he said, Bring them now near to me, and I will bless them.

Revised Douay-Rheims         He answered: They are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place. And he said: Bring them to me that I may bless them.

Latin Vulgate                          .

Aramaic ESV of Peshitta        Yoseph said to his father, "They are my sons, whom God has given me here." He said, "Please bring them to me, and I will bless them."

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And Joseph said to his father, They are my sons whom God has given me in this place. And he said, Bring them near me, and I will bless them.

Septuagint (Greek)                And Joseph said to his father, They are my sons, whom God gave me here; and Jacob said, Bring me them, that I may bless them.

NETS (Greek)                        .

Brenton’s Septuagint             .

 

Significant differences: 


Limited Vocabulary Translations:

 

Bible in Basic English             And Joseph said to his father, They are my sons, whom God has given me in this land. And he said, Let them come near me, and I will give them a blessing.

Easy English                          .

Easy-to-Read Version–2001  .

Easy-to-Read Version–2006  Joseph said to his father, “These are my sons. These are the boys God gave me.”

Israel said, “Bring your sons to me. I will bless them.”

God’s Word                         .

Good News Bible (TEV)         .

The Message                         .

Names of God Bible               “They are my sons, whom Elohim has given me here in Egypt,” Joseph answered his father.

Then Israel said, “Please bring them to me so that I may bless them.”

NIRV                                      .

New Simplified Bible              .


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Joseph told his father, “They’re my sons, whom God gave me here.”

Israel said, “Bring them to me and I will bless them.”

Contemporary English V.       Joseph answered, "They are my sons. God has given them to me here in Egypt." "Bring them to me," Jacob said. "I want to give them my blessing."

The Living Bible                     .

New Berkeley Version           .

New Century Version             .

New Life Version                    .

New Living Translation           “Yes,” Joseph told him, “these are the sons God has given me here in Egypt.”

And Jacob said, “Bring them closer to me, so I can bless them.”


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And JoSeph replied to his father: 'They're the sons that God has given to me here.'

And Jacob said: 'Bring them here, so I can bless them.'

Beck’s American Translation .

International Standard V        .

New Advent (Knox) Bible       The sons God has given me, said he, while I have been living here. Bring them close to me, he answered, and let me give them my blessing; by now, Israel’s eyes were failing through his great age, and he could not see clearly. V. 10 is included for context.

Today’s NIV                          .

Translation for Translators     Joseph replied to his father, “They are the sons that God has given to me here in Egypt.” Jacob said, “Bring them close to me so that I can bless them.”


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Awful Scroll Bible                   Joseph was to say, to his father: They are the sons, he of mighty ones is to have granted to me. He was to say: Be getting them, even was I to approve of them.

Conservapedia                       .

Ferrar-Fenton Bible                But Joseph said to his father, " They are the sons which God gave me here !"

He, however, replied, " I will take them now for myself, and bless them."

God’s Truth (Tyndale)           .

HCSB                                     .

Jubilee Bible 2000                  .

Lexham English Bible            .

H. C. Leupold                         .

NIV, ©2011                             “They are the sons God has given me here,” Joseph said to his father.

Then Israel said, “Bring them to me so I may bless them.”

NIV – UK                                .

Tree of Life Version                .

Urim-Thummim Version         .

Wikipedia Bible Project          .


Catholic Bibles (those having the imprimatur):

 

Christian Community (1988)  .

The Heritage Bible                 .

New American Bible (2002)   .

New Jerusalem Bible             .

New RSV                               .

Revised English Bible            “They are my sons”, replied Joseph, “whom God has given me here.” Israel said, “Then bring them to me, that I may bless them.”


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Complete Jewish Bible       &#