Genesis 3

 

Genesis 3:1–24

The Temptation, the Fall and God’s Judgement


These studies are designed for believers in Jesus Christ only. If you have exercised faith in Christ, then you are in the right place. If you have not, then you need to heed the words of our Lord, Who said, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son, so that every [one] believing [or, trusting] in Him shall not perish, but shall be have eternal life! For God did not send His Son into the world so that He should judge the world, but so that the world shall be saved through Him. The one believing [or, trusting] in Him is not judged, but the one not believing has already been judged, because he has not believed in the Name of the only-begotten [or, uniquely-born] Son of God.” (John 3:16–18). “I am the Way and the Truth and the Life! No one comes to the Father except through [or, by means of] Me!” (John 14:6).


Every study of the Word of God ought to be preceded by a naming of your sins to God. This restores you to fellowship with God (1John 1:8–10). If there are people around, you would name these sins silently. If there is no one around, then it does not matter if you name them silently or whether you speak aloud.


This is a collection of the weekly lessons of Genesis (HTML) (PDF) interspersed with the complete word-by-word exegesis of this chapter from the Hebrew with some information from Genesis (HTML) (PDF) thrown in. Furthermore, the examination of this chapter has been expanded with additional commentary as well. However, much of this material was thrown together without careful editing. Therefore, from time to time, there will be concepts and exegetical material which will be repeated, because there was no overall editing done once all of this material was combined. At some point in the future, I need to go back and edit this material and consider other source material as well. Links to the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies of Genesis (HTML) (PDF).

 

One more thing: it is not necessary that you read the grey Hebrew exegesis tables. They are set apart from the rest of the study so that you can easily skip over them. However, if you ever doubt a translation of a phrase or a verse, these translation tables will tell you exactly where that translation came from.


This should be the most extensive examination of Gen. 3 available, where you will be able to see every word of the original text.


Outline of Chapter 3:

 

Introduction

 

         vv.     1–5           The Fall: Satan Deceives the Woman

         v.       6            The Fall: the Man and the Woman Succumb

         vv.     7–8           The Fall: Initial Results of the Man and Woman’s Sin

         vv.     9–13         The Fall: God Gathers the Facts

         vv.    14–15         God Judges the Serpent

         v.       16           God Judges the Woman

         vv.    17–19         God Judges the Man

         vv.    20–21         The First Atonement

         vv.    22–24         God Expels Man from the Garden of Eden

 

Addendum


Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines:

 

         Introduction         Science and Genesis 1–2

         Introduction         Satan

         Introduction         The Fall of Satan

 

         v.       4              The Basis of Satan’s Appeals

         v.       6              Eve and the Apple (a photograph)

         v.       6              The Shifting Authority

         v.       7              The Doctrine of Human Good

         v.       7              The Doctrine of Morality

         v.      10              The Doctrine of Truth and Lies

         v.      11              What Does the Bible Claim for Itself?

         v.      11              The Historicity of Adam, the Woman and the Fall

         v.      14              Satan’s Appearance

         v.      15              The Seed of the Woman as Found in the Bible

         v.      15              Genesis 3:14–15: God’s Judgement of the Serpent

         v.      16              Scar Tissue of the Soul

         v.      16              Genesis 3:14–16: God’s Judgment of the Serpent and then the Woman

         v.      19              Genesis 3:14–19: God’s Judgments of the Serpent, the Woman and the Man

         v.      21              The Doctrine of Atonement

         v.      22              How We Stand Corrupted and Condemned before God

         v.      24              The Cherubim of God

 

         Addendum          Josephus’ History of this Time

         Addendum          Edersheim Summarizes Genesis 3

         Addendum          A Complete Translation of Genesis 3


Chapter Outline

 

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines

Forward

Doctrines Covered and Alluded to

Chapters of the Bible Alluded To

Psalms Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

Other Chapters of the Bible Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

Definition of Terms

Introduction

Text

Addendum

www.kukis.org

 

Exegetical Studies in Genesis


Doctrines Covered

Doctrines Alluded To

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chapters of the Bible Alluded To

 

 

 

 


Psalms Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

 

 

 

 


Other Chapters of the Bible Appropriately Exegeted with this Chapter

 

 

 

 


Many who read and study this chapter are 1st or 2nd generation students of R. B. Thieme, Jr., so that much of this vocabulary is second nature. One of Bob’s contributions to theology is a fresh vocabulary along with a number of concepts which are theologically new or reworked, yet still orthodox. Therefore, if you are unfamiliar with his work, the definitions below will help you to fully understand all that is being said. Also, I have developed a few new terms and concepts which require definition as well.

In addition, there are other more traditional yet technical theological terms which will be used and therefore defined as well.

Sometimes the terms in the exegesis of this chapter are simply alluded to, without any in-depth explanation of them. Sometimes, these terms are explained in detail and illustrated. A collection of all these terms is found here: (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Definition of Terms

Client Nation

Client-Nation, is a national entity in which a certain number of spiritually mature Christians (the salt of the earth) have formed a pivot sufficient to sustain the nation and through which God specifically protects this nation so that believers can fulfill the divine mandates of evangelism, communication and custodianship of Bible doctrine, providing a haven for Jews, and sending missionaries abroad. The United States is a client-nation to God. A client nation must have freedom: Freedom to seek God, freedom to use one’s own volition and self-determination to succeed or fail, freedom from anarchy and tyranny, freedom for evangelism, freedom for believers to hear Bible teaching without government interference and, therefore, to grow spiritually, and freedom to send missionaries to other nations.

Cycles of Discipline (Stage of National Discipline)

A national entity which is a client nation to God is under both God’s protection and His discipline (much like the individual believer). As a nation moves further and further from God, God may impose disciplinary measures on that nation, which include economic disaster, illness, civil unrest, military defeat, and even invasion which may include a slavery or dispersion of the people. These cycles are found in Lev. 26. Although these warnings are designed for Israel, all client nations to God may face similar downward historical trends.

Fifth Cycle of Discipline (the 5th Stage of National Discipline)

The fifth cycle of discipline involves complete loss of personal and national sovereignty, the destruction of the family and the nation. Offerings to God are unacceptable. Nations which have undergone this destruction have experienced slavery, cannibalism, and the assimilation of its surviving citizens into other cultures.

Rebound (Restoration to fellowship with God)

In the New Testament, this is naming your sins to God, so that you are both restored to temporal fellowship with God and are then filled with the Spirit of God. In the Old Testament, naming your sins to God would result in a restoration of fellowship and, in some cases, the empowerment of the Holy Spirit once again (the Holy Spirit was not given to all Old Testament believers). See the Doctrine of Rebound (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

Some of these definitions are taken from

http://www.bibledoctrinechurch.org/?subpages/GLOSSARY.shtml

http://rickhughesministries.org/content/Biblical-Terms.pdf

http://www.gbible.org/index.php?proc=d4d

http://www.wordoftruthministries.org/termsanddefs.htm

http://www.realtime.net/~wdoud/topics.html

http://www.theopedia.com/


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An Introduction to Genesis 3


I ntroduction: Chapter 3 brings the fall of man. As was mentioned in the previous chapter, we do not know how long this state of innocence lasted. It is possible that man's fall occurred within the week. I like to think of it as a long time; a decade or a century, but that is personal romanticism. Because we cannot put a time on the birth of Cain relative to man's total existence, we cannot get a fix on this time period. The best we can do is speculate: Adam is 130 years old when he sired Seth (Gen. 5:5), who is not necessarily his third child and not necessarily even his third male child (although that is most likely). If Adam had sired Cain and Abel and daughters within the previous decade or two and if his age was calculated upon his beginning in the garden, then man may have spent a century in the Garden of Eden in a state of innocence. Adam and the woman had settled down into some sort of a routine and that routine sometimes included time away from each other, even in perfect environment without two old sin natures. They had both been carefully instructed by Jesus Christ in the garden not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Perfect environment for them included being taught knowledge (or, Bible doctrine if you will) by Jesus Christ in the garden, time together and time alone, sex, eating, enjoying the view and no children.


The angels and Satan had the earth under observation. Satan is intelligent beyond what we can imagine, although he is not omniscient. We can be certain that he carefully planned his attack. We do not know how many other attacks which he made upon the man and the woman. He had one objective, however, and that was to get man and the woman to sin against God. He and his demon troops had all been sentenced to spend eternity in the Lake of Fire and he appealed this decision. He was certainly filled with rage and jealousy against man and this idyllic existence. First of all, the man enjoyed sex with his right woman, something which Satan never had the opportunity to do. Then, although man was weak and stupid by comparison, he enjoyed a life far better than Satan would ever enjoy.


What was Satan's objective here? Very likely, he wanted to show how unfair God would be to Adam and the woman when they sinned just as God had been so unfair to Satan for his sin. Satan judged God's objectives, motives and decisions based upon his own fallen nature and made false conclusions based upon his false assumptions. At this time, Satan had no idea how long human history would last; how long until he would be cast into the Lake of Fire; nor did he know that God would come to earth as a man and pay for Adam's sin and every subsequent sin of mankind. Satan, in his arrogance, just wanted to stir up trouble. It would seem likely that Satan even sat back and observed for a time being, hoping that Adam would, of his own free will, choose against God and take from the forbidden tree.


Satan was on the scene already. We have already studied the Angelic Conflict back in Gen. 1 (HTML) (PDF).

This chapter of the Bible is about the temptation of Eve and the fall of man. What we find in this chapter is a serpent (snake) which confuses and deceives Eve, deceiving her, thus causing her to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Since Satan is herein introduced, we need to have an idea of who Satan is.

Satan

1.      It is important to note that, Satan is a real person. Although he is not human, he has thoughts, personality, and emotion. The Bible always presents Satan as a real entity and never as some sort of impersonal force. Gen. 3:1–15 Matt. 4

2.      Our first introduction to Satan directly is in Gen. 3:1–15, where he will deceive the woman and get her to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Satan was indirectly introduced between Gen. 1:1 and 1:2, where the earth became empty and a waste-place. This had to happen in some way, and certainly, Satan and the fallen angels were involved; however, we are not given any details at that point as to what exactly took place. If you allowed some teenagers to party in your house, unsupervised, the way that your house would look the next day is not unlike what Satan and other fallen angels did to the earth.

3.      Satan is called Lucifer in Isa. 14:12, which means morning star, shining one; light bearer. Angels are associated with light (they are sometimes called stars), and Satan was apparently the grandest angel of them all. Oh shining star [Lucifer], son of the morning, how you have fallen from the heavens! You, who weakens the nations, you are cut down to the ground. For you have said In your heart, “I will go up to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God, and I will sit in the mount of meeting, in the sides of the north. I will rise over the heights of the clouds; I will be compared to the Most High.” Yet you will go down to Sheol, to the sides of the Pit (Isa. 14:12–15). This is Satan’s fall, and it is his sin of arrogance which seems to be the reason for his fall.

         1)      Lucifer is associated with the stars and the heavens, from which he has fallen.

         2)      Notice how Lucifer is described: you, who weakens the nations... Satan is the father of internationalism. It is God Who separates us into nations (we will see this in Gen. 11).

         3)      Satan exalts himself over all of the other angels (the stars of God) and compares himself to God.

         4)      However, Satan has been judged.

4.      He is called Satan in Job 1–2 and elsewhere. Satan means adversary, accuser; and it is not a far leap to understand his name to mean attorney. His actions in the courtroom of God in that passage reveals the mind of an attorney.

5.      Satan’s fall is also mentioned in Ezek. 28:12–19, a passage which begins as a lament for the king of Tyre, but morphs into a lament for Satan: Son of man, lift up a lament over the king of Tyre, and say to him, So says the Lord Jehovah: You seal the measure, full of wisdom and perfect in beauty. You have been in Eden, the garden of God. Every precious stone was your covering; the ruby, the topaz, and the jasper, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the turquoise, and the carbuncle, and gold; the workmanship of your tambourines and of your flutes in you. In the day you were created, they were prepared. You were the anointed cherub that covers, and I had put you in the holy heights of God, where you were. You walked up and down in the midst of the stones of fire. You were perfect in your ways from the day you were created, until iniquity was found in you. By the multitude of your trade, they filled your midst with violence, and you sinned. So I cast you defiled from the height of God, and I destroyed you, O covering cherub, from among the stones of fire. Your heart was lifted up because of your beauty; you corrupted your wisdom because of your splendor. I have cast you to the ground. I will put you before kings, that they may see you. By the host of your iniquities, by the iniquity of your trade, you have defiled your holy places. So I brought a fire from your midst and it shall devour you, and I will give you for ashes on the earth in the sight of all who see you. All who know you among the peoples shall be appalled at you. You shall be terrors, and you will not be forever.

         1)      We are told that Satan had been in the Garden of Eden. This is the narrative we are about to study.

         2)      He was an anointed cherub (another Biblical name for angels; it is probably a certain classification of angels).

         3)      Satan is a created being.

         4)      He was created perfect, which perfection was maintained until iniquity was found in him.

         5)      His sin was arrogance, because of his great beauty; and this arrogance corrupted his great intelligence.

6.      The argument might be made, so what if some people sin; so what if some angels sin; it is a big universe; just give them a place to hang out and sin. We do not know a lot about Satan’s life before he fell and after he fell, apart from these two passages, but it will be clear in Gen. 3 that he is unable to leave well enough alone. Here is Adam and his woman in perfect environment, and Satan’s gut-reaction is to become involved and to mess it up.

         1)      Life is filled with parallel situations. When a person begins using drugs, this is rarely a choice that he makes in a vacuum. Invariably, he has friends or associates who coax him to take drugs. Rarely does he talk to a friend, and his friend tells him, “Look, even though drugs make me feel great, they have screwed up my life royally. I cannot concentrate in school, I cannot hold down a job, I cannot maintain a decent relationship, and I spend much of my life thinking about getting high. All the people I know who use drugs tend to screw up their lives more and more. I strongly recommend that you do not ever even try drugs.” Most of the time, their friend makes drugs available. Then the person who is hooked goes out and evangelizes others to join him in taking drugs. My point is, Satan was not able to just sin, and then walk away to some corner of the universe and continue sinning to his heart’s delight. He had to entice others to his lifestyle and to his way of thinking.

         2)      Atheists cannot leave well enough alone. They become overly concerned about a manger scene at Christmas time in a capitol building; or they walk into a store, and call management because the employees are all wearing green or red and they tell the customers, “Have a merry Christmas!” The sin nature is powerful, and often, such a one will take time from their busy lives to complain to someone. I’ve been in Thailand, and I have been in the palaces with the ubiquitous statues of Buddha, and to various shrines with Buddha—many of which are state-sponsored (I assume). It did not make me upset. I did not ponder as to the morality of this nation, which is a poor but developing nation, spending money on Buddha stuff. It never occurred to me to try to locate someone in authority and to lodge my complaint. There are Christian evangelists within Thailand. I doubt that any of them try to convince their converts to remove Buddhism and Buddha statues from Thailand. In fact, I suspect that none of them ever even considered such a thing.

         3)      Like the atheist, Satan is unable to just let things be.

7.      We find out a great deal more about Satan in Job 1–2, a narrative which takes place probably before the time of Abraham and probably after the flood. Satan apparently has access to both the earth and the throne room of God (I would assume with permission, he has this access). Satan has some power over what happens here on earth, according to these first couple chapters of Genesis, as long as God grants him this power. His primary inclination is to destroy the life of Job in any way that he can, in order to prove a point. The suffering which Job endures is simply a bonus to Satan.

         1)      Let me draw another parallel. Satan is willing to inflict the worst and most painful punishment upon Job—a man who has nothing to do with Satan—in order to make a point. Along these lines, we have the Satanically-inspired radical Islam today, and they will kill innocent people in order to make a religious and/or political point of some sort. In fact, most of the time, these radical Muslims kill more fellow Muslims than anyone else, simply because these Muslims are not radical enough, in their estimation.

         2)      When I was in Thailand, I recall that an older farmer was captured and beheaded by some Islamic radicals. I suspect that, like most people, this man was just providing for his family. However, somehow, by taking this man hostage and then beheading him, something of value was accomplished in the eyes of the Muslims who did this.

         3)      This is how Satan thinks and acts; and this is one of the reasons we understand Islam to be of Satan.

8.      This is who the serpent is, speaking to Eve in the Garden of Eden. This is how the serpent thinks. Satan has fallen; God has restored the earth, and Satan is going to become involved. Satan cannot leave Adam and the woman alone. Although we all have a sin nature now, Satan is still unable to leave well enough alone. He helped to corrupt this earth, but he cannot just let that be—his involvement in this world continues.

9.      Satan is found in Rev. 12:4, in which context he is called the great dragon: His tail swept down a third of the stars of heaven and cast them to the earth. And the dragon stood before the woman who was about to give birth, so that when she bore her child he might devour it.

         1)      The dragon’s tail which swept down a third of the stars of heaven refers to Satan influencing a third of the angels to sin, and follow him. It is these angels who are cast down to earth.

         2)      It is Satan who desired to destroy Jesus Christ when He was born of a woman, as an expression of his intense hatred for God.

10.    So that there is no confusion, Satan is equated with the devil, with the great dragon and with the serpent of old in Rev. 12:9. This is all the same angelic being.

11.    Today, Satan attacks our thinking.

         1)      This has always been the case. In Gen. 3, with the woman, his attack will be on her thinking, and her actions will follow suit.

         2)      In John 13:2, we are told: the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to betray him. Judas was an unbeliever, and Satan was able to, in some way, influence his thinking. The exact mechanics of this are difficult to elucidate.

12.    Satan tempts us to sin. Gen. 3:1–6 Matt. 4:3

13.    Satan is the father of religion.

         1)      When speaking to some Jews in the Temple (which would have been those steeped in Judaism and included scribes and pharisees), Jesus told them, “You are of your father the devil, and your will is to do your father's desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, and has nothing to do with the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks out of his own character, for he is a liar and the father of lies.” (John 8:44). Their eventual response was, they picked up stones to throw at Him, but Jesus hid Himself and went out of the temple (John 8:59).

         2)      Sometimes it is obvious that a religion is Satanic, as it is with Islam (a good place to confirm this is www.thereligionofpeace.com); and sometimes, it is not quite as obvious, as with Buddhism and many forms of Catholicism and Pentecostalism.

         3)      Jesus calls many of the religious men in the Temple sons of the devil, because they did not recognize Who Jesus was. John 8:41–44

14.    Satan is the ruler of this world.

         1)      Jesus calls him the ruler of this world in John 12:31 14:30 16:11.

         2)      Paul calls Satan the god of this world in 2Cor. 4:4 and the prince of the power of the air in Eph. 2:2.

         3)      John tells us that the whole world lies in the power of the evil one (1John 5:19).

15.    The conflict that we are involved with is against Satan in the realm of the Angelic Conflict: For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places (Eph. 6:12). Satan is our adversary (1Peter 5:8).

16.    Satan has the power of death (if granted by God). Heb. 2:14 compared with Job 2:3–6.

17.    We are to resist Satan and his thinking. 1Peter 5:8–9 James 4:7

18.    The human race is broken down into two categories:

         1)      The sons of God: you are all sons of God, through faith (in Christ Jesus) (Gal. 3:26 compared with 3:22). See also Rom. 8:14 Gal. 4:6 1John 3:10.

         2)      The sons of the devil: Matt. 13:38 John 8:44 1John 3:10.

19.    Satan does have the ability to deceive us with false signs and wonders. 2Thess. 2:9–10

20.    Satan’s power is limited. He is not God; he does not have the attributes of God; and God specifically limits his power and actions. Job 1:9-12 2:4-6 Matt. 8:30–32

21.    Satan has been judged and he will spend eternity in the Lake of Fire. Matt. 25:41 John 12:31 Rev. 20:10, 14

This is by no means a complete examination of Satan. It is just enough information, so that you realize that, Satan was created by God; Satan fell because of his choice to sin against God; and that this all occurred prior to the restoration of the earth. At this point, we find Satan in the garden, with the intention of causing trouble. It is a large universe; given that Satan can travel instantly between the throne room of God and the earth, this would suggest that he could have located himself to any planet or any place in the universe at this time. He chose to go to the earth, to deal with God’s newest creation, a creation which did not sin and was not involved in good and evil.

Although most of this doctrine was original (although based upon my many years at Berachah Church), some came from: http://www.biblicalproportions.com/modules/wfsection/article.php?articleid=4652&page=0


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Let’s take a look at Satan’s fall as well.

The Fall of Satan

 1.     Satan's origin Ezek. 28. Chronologically, we first find Satan in the garden of Eden, prior to human history, and he was blameless at that time (Ezek. 28:13,15) indicating that Satan did live on earth prior to man and that the earth was not originally created for man but for the angelic creation. Satan was a created being (Ezek. 28:13b) and he was created beautiful and wise (Ezek. 28:12b). Satan's sin, insofar as we can tell, was arrogance (Ezek. 28:17). Satan, in his fall, took with him one-third of the angels (Isa. 14:12–14 Ezek. 28:15b). For his one sin of arrogance, Satan is destined to be cast into eternal fire (Ezek. 28:16,18 Matt. 25:41). However, Satan is not there at this time; he is roaming about the earth (Gen. 3:1 Job 1:7 2:2 Matt. 4:1). This indicates that even though Satan has been sentenced to the Lake of Fire, he will not actually be cast into the Lake of Fire until the future (Rev. 20:10).

 2.      What Satan did is recorded in Isa. 14:13–14. [God is speaking—Isa. 14:4,22] "But you said in your heart, 'I will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars [angels] of God, and I will sit on the mount of assembly in the recesses of the north. I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.'" We do not know if this was Satan's first sin or a result of his first sin. It is possible that Satan also had placed before him the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and that he ate from it before man did (man would not have even been on the scene yet). We have already seen n Gen. 1:1–2 and Isa. 45:18 that the earth was not created a wasteland and a dump but it was crated to be occupied; it became a wasteland and a dump. In any case, Satan became arrogant (either before taking from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, after taking from that tree, or apart from the tree altogether). All the suffering which we face here on earth is a result of (1) Satan's arrogance and (2) Adam's sin. This does not take us off the hook insofar as our own volition is concerned. By our many poor choices in life, we often make ourselves miserable without the help of Satan or an imperfect environment (Prov. 22:8 Gal. 6:7).

 3.      In his fallen state, Satan acts as a prosecuting attorney in the courtroom of God accusing man (Job 1:7 2:2 Zech. 3:1,2 Rev. 12:10). God has apparently set aside time to hear the petitions of the angels and Satan (Job 1:6) [This indicates, by the way, that God hears petitions from fallen creatures; this also means he probably hears petitions from elect angels. The courtroom here gives the angelic creation the chance to view all of the evidence which exists and to make their own determination concerning the petition brought before God. God has made His perfect determination from eternity past; however, when He passes sentence, those present are allowed to see why it is just.]. Satan has access to the earth and to observe what is occurring on earth (Job 1:7) and he impugns God's character by objecting to the way things are going on earth. This is pictured in the beginning of the book of Job. God points out to Satan (and the other angels, both elect and fallen) his servant Job. Satan objects that Job is faithful only because he knows who provides him with prosperity. Take away this prosperity and Job will curse God and his life (Job 1:8–12). The reason I point this out is to: (1) establish that God does have a courtroom of sorts where He hears the petitions of his creatures. (2) Reveal that Satan has access to this courtroom and to the earth. (3)  That Satan will use this opportunity to attack the believers on earth and, incidental to this attack, impugn God's perfect character.

 4.      Points #1 and 3 set up the following logical deduction: if there is a courtroom of God and if Satan has been sentenced to the Lake of Fire but is not there; and if Satan is instead tempting and accusing man, why is this occurring? Since we are created in the image of God, it is likely that our court system is a shadow of His, albeit imperfect. What has likely happened is that Satan has appealed this sentence on the following grounds:

                Satan perhaps claimed that he sinned because God designed him to sin. He did not have any choice. This is one of the reasons that man's free will is so important. This objection is dealt with by Paul in Rom. 9:20–21.

                Satan certainly objected to the severity and the eternity of the punishment that he faced. No doubt he insisted that the punishment was too harsh. Certainly, all he did was either eat from a little tree or display a bit of arrogance. All of human history answers this objection. We live in a world of tremendous suffering, pain and tears. Many of the things which seem right and good, that we too often place our trust in, such as human love, results in pain and humiliation.

                Satan claimed that the only reason a creature followed God and behaved as God wished was for reward from God. Satan leveled this objection against Job and very likely leveled this objection against the elect angels. The life of Job answers this objection.

                If a created creature does not follow God out of reward, then he obeys God out of pure and simple fear of punishment. Human history and growing up in a family has shown us that there is nothing wrong with discipline or with obedience due to discipline. God sets up standards and consequences out of love. For whom the Lord loves, he disciplines and he scourges every son whom He receives. (Heb. 12:6).

                How could God really have the attribute of love if He casts some of His creatures into a Lake of Fire? We find our Lord's love expressed in the person of Jesus Christ who came to this earth and walked among us, suffering temptations which we cannot begin to imagine, and then dying on our behalf, enduring an eternity of hells for all of us, that we might be redeemed. This is love beyond human comprehension. We might die for a person that we love, but Jesus Christ died for the unlovely, the arrogant, the vicious, the immoral and the unrighteous. Yet, in fact Christ, while we were still helpless, at the proper time, died for the ungodly. For one will rarely die for a righteous man; though perhaps for the good man, someone would be brave enough to die. But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. (Rom. 5:6–8)

                Is God really righteous to subject His creatures to a Lake of Fire? God's righteousness is demonstrated by the cross. His righteousness is revealed in His Law and in the results of rebellion. God's righteousness is an integral part of His character and essence, wherein there is no variation or shifting shadow. (James 1:17). For in it [the gospel] is the righteousness of God revealed from [salvation] faith to [living] faith-doctrine. (Rom. 1:17a).

                God does not know what it is like to be a creature and subjected to the temptations that creatures face. This objection is answered by the fact that Jesus Christ came to earth and faced the same temptations and the same deprivation that we face and more.

These are educated guesses as to some of Satan's objections. Being a genius, I am certain that he raised many more objections than these. If any of these sound familiar, they ought to. Satan has been raising these objections in men's minds for millenniums to turn man away from God. It would also be important to point out that these are not necessarily heart-felt objections of a sincerely repentant creature; these are rationalizations for improper behavior and ethics; these objections are a way of side-stepping responsibility for one's actions.

 5.      Satan certainly made appeals on the grounds similar to what we have to day:

                Certainly he promised never to do it again.

                Perhaps he pleased temporary insanity or diminished capacity.

                He may have claimed that he had no idea that the results would be so devastating.

                Perhaps he claimed to never do it again.

                Perhaps he claimed to be rehabilitated.

                It is possible that Satan just asked for a corner of the universe in which to hang so that he and his fallen angel buddies could live there. God has the entire universe; what is a small portion of it to Him?

                Perhaps he claimed that God's laws were too strict and unbending and that they could do fine without these laws.

Whatever appeals that Satan made along these lines, his activity in human history shows us that he cannot be allowed to roam the universe freely. He will cause death, pain and suffering wherever he happens to be. God cannot give Satan a second chance nor would it be right for God to provide Satan with a devil's island, so to speak, within the universe (other than the Lake of Fire). Human history shows us that Satan cannot be trusted and that he cannot be allowed to have any portion of the universe in which to roam. His fallen nature makes him a danger to all creatures in the universe.

 6.      This view of pre-Adamic history explains:

                Why we are observed by angels.

                Why Satan is sentenced to the Lake of Fire yet is not there now and he still has the freedom to move about between heaven and the earth.

                This explains why good is sometimes evil.

                This explains why Satan would like to restore order and peace on earth. In his arrogance, he wants to show that he can act as God and that his plans are equal to those of God (Isa. 14:13–14)..

                Why God came to earth as a man.

 7.      Satan will be allowed to operate on earth under the following environments:

                Man is innocent and environment is perfect.

                Man is fallen and angels may cohabit with females.

                Man is fallen and angels are not allowed to cohabit with females; yet they are allowed to indwell unbelievers.

                Israel as a nation operates in many states, as a client nation to God in many different levels of power, or lack thereof.

                Israel is ruled by the Romans and the Son of God walks on this imperfect, fallen world.

                Satan is given a great deal of freedom during the tribulation to bring about world peace and order.

                Satan is bound while man enjoys perfect environment again (although it is possible that man is not always regenerate and it is possible that some regenerate men still have old sin natures; I am not certain about this.

                Satan is allowed to tempt man again during perfect environment and he will lead another revolt against God and against perfect environment.

In all of these environments, Satan will operate and tempt man and not make the earth a better place to live, but will cause continued pain and suffering among humankind. His act of arrogance results in millenniums of suffering for mankind. Again, this does not remove our responsibility for our volition when it is used to sin against God; but his one act of arrogance has plunged our world into sinful darkness and misery. Surely God is righteous to condemn an act which continues to cause so much grief and pain.

 8.      Conclusion: God created angels with free will, creating Satan as perhaps the most beautiful and intelligent creature of all. Satan fell in an act of arrogance and took with him a third of angelic creation. God judged and passed sentence upon Satan, yet Satan is allowed a great deal of freedom of movement. His actions in the court of God imply that he must have objected to God's harsh sentence. God answers this objection before all of angelic creation, both fallen and elect, through the creation of mankind and through human history. This may not always seem fair to us, but God has made provision for our salvation and for our entire lives, at great personal expense. For us, attaining salvation and a wonderful life is a matter of our own free will. Furthermore, at the end of our life, if we have believed in Jesus Christ, God will provide us with comfort and love and rewards beyond our imaginations. No temptation or testing has overtaken you but such as is common to man; and God is faithful who will not allow you to be tempted or tested beyond what you are able [to bear], but with this temptation also provide the way out that you may be able to endure it. (I Cor. 10:13). For we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His pre-determined plan. (Rom. 8:28). For the Lamb in the center of the throne shall be their shepherd and shall guide them to springs of the water of life; and God shall wipe every tear from their eyes. (Rev. 7:17). And He shall wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there shall no longer be death; there shall no longer be mourning or crying or pain; the first things have passed away. (Rev. 21:4). And when He [the Holy Spirit] has arrived, He will convince the world concerning sin, and righteousness and judgement: concerning sin because they do not believe in Me; and concerning righteousness, because I got to the Father and you will no longer see Me; and concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world [Satan] has been judged. (John 16:8–11)

 


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Satan enters into the body of the serpent (possibly an extinct animal; more than likely it is a snake since the same word continues to occur in the Old Testament). Or, more likely, Satan takes on the form of a serpent. Possibly God does not allow Satan to manifest himself bodily to the woman at this point because he is a creature of tremendous beauty and he has a marvelous personality and he would have charmed the woman into whatever course of action he chose due to his incredible presence.


There is a possible precedent set here: Satan begins by using demon possession and speaking in tongues. The serpent takes on the characteristics of Satan. Or, the option which I believe is the more likely, Satan takes on another form—he assumes the form of a serpent (in later chapters of the Bible, both the Revealed Member of the Trinity and angels will appear to be men (Gen. 18:1–2 19:1).


A lot of people like to allegorize the first few chapters of Genesis. Gen. 3 is about the serpent coming to the woman, speaking to her, and getting her to eat from the Tree of Knowing Good and Evil. Then she has her husband eat from this tree. However, there is no actual reason why this narrative needs to be allegorical. I am not sure I have heard a plausible parallel narrative that this supposedly represents.


So far, as has already been discussed, if the first few chapters of Genesis were allegorical, then how could the Bible be so right on in its allegories? That is, how could the author know about the big bang theory, about the ice age, about the atmosphere, about man being made of the same chemicals as the earth, or about cloning. How can a series of allegories be so much in synch with science. Sure, if the universe was a teardrop that fell off the back of a turtle, and it exploded in a sea of tears into whatever, I might want to say, “That’s either just made up crap or that is allegorical.” However, one thing after another lines up with what we know to be true today.


Let’s just recount these things.

Science and Genesis 1–2

Scripture

Science

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth (Gen. 1:1; MKJV). Perfect tense suggests an event that occurs all at once or an event that is viewed from its accomplished state.

This is compatible with the Big Bang Theory.

And the earth was without form and empty. And darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved on the face of the waters (Gen. 1:2; MKJV). The implication is, heat is applied to the surface of the earth and the waters are melted.

This is compatible with a massive ice age.

And God said, Let there be an expanse [or, dome, firmament] in the middle of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the expanse, and divided the waters which were under the expanse from the waters which were above the expanse; and it was so. And God called the expanse, Heavens. And the evening and the morning were the second day (Gen. 2:6–8; MKJV).

This is compatible with atmosphere stretched around the earth. Bear in mind that God spent an entire day on this, doing something that no one has even begun to appreciate.

And Jehovah God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul (Gen. 2:7; MKJV).

Only recently has science discovered that our bodies are made out of the same material as the ground.

And Jehovah God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam, and he slept. And He took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh underneath. And Jehovah God made the rib (which He had taken from the man) into a woman. And He brought her to the man. And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh. She shall be called Woman because she was taken out of man (Gen. 2:21–23; MKJV).

We have both the concept of anesthesia, an operation, and the concept of modified cloning, where an exact replica is not desired. Again, all of these concepts, apart from the last one, have become well-known in just the most recent years.

There are dozens of “creation myths” out there. I challenge you to take the first two chapters of any of them and find the same sort of agreement with science.


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Fall: Satan Deceives the Woman


Slavishly literal:

 

Moderately literal:

And the serpent was crafty [and devious] from every animal of the field which had made Yehowah Elohim. And so he says unto the woman, “Indeed that has said, Elohim, ‘You [all] will not eat from every tree of the garden’?”

Genesis

3:1

Now the serpent was more insightful [and devious] than any animal of the field that Yehowah Elohim had made. He said unto the woman, “Indeed [is it really true] that Elohim has said, ‘You [all] will not eat from every tree of the garden’?”

Now, the serpent was more devious and insightful than any creature of the field that Jehovah God has made. The serpent said to the woman, “Is it really true that God gave the command, ‘You both cannot eat from every tree in the garden’?”


Here is how others have translated this verse:

 

Ancient texts:                       Note: I compare the Hebrew text to English translations of the Latin, Syriac and Greek texts, using the Douay-Rheims translation; George Lamsa’s translation, and Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton’s translation as revised and edited by Paul W. Esposito, respectively. I often update these texts with non-substantive changes (e.g., you for thou, etc.). I often use the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible instead of Brenton’s translation, because it updates the English text.

 

The Septuagint was the earliest known translation of a book (circa 200 b.c.). Since this translation was made before the textual criticism had been developed into a science and because different books appear to be translated by different men, the Greek translation can sometimes be very uneven.

 

When there are serious disparities between my translation and Brenton’s (or the text of the Complete Apostles’ Bible), I look at the Greek text of the Septuagint (the LXX) to see if a substantive difference actually exists (and I reflect these changes in the English rendering of the Greek text). I use the Greek LXX with Strong’s numbers and morphology available for e-sword. The only problem with this resource (which is a problem for similar resources) is, there is no way to further explore Greek verbs which are not found in the New Testament. Although I usually quote the Complete Apostles’ Bible here, I have begun to make changes in the translation when their translation conflicts with the Greek and note what those changes are.

 

The Masoretic text is the Hebrew text with all of the vowels (vowel points) inserted (the original Hebrew text lacked vowels). We take the Masoretic text to be the text closest to the original. However, differences between the Masoretic text and the Greek, Latin and Syriac are worth noting and, once in a great while, represent a more accurate text possessed by those other ancient translators.

 

In general, the Latin text is an outstanding translation from the Hebrew text into Latin and very trustworthy (I say this as a non-Catholic). Unfortunately, I do not read Latin—apart from some very obvious words—so I am dependent upon the English translation of the Latin (principally, the Douay-Rheims translation).

 

Underlined words indicate differences in the text.

 

Bracketed portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls are words, letters and phrases lost in the scroll due to various types of damage. Underlined words or phrases are those in the Dead Sea Scrolls but not in the Masoretic text.

 

The Targum of Onkelos is actually the Pentateuchal Targumim, which are The Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan Ben Uzziel. On the Pentateuch With The Fragments of the Jerusalem Targum From the Chaldee by J. W. Etheridge, M.A. Take from http://targum.info/targumic-texts/pentateuchal-targumim/ and first published in 1862.

 

Dead Sea Scrolls                   [Now the serpent was more] crafty [than any beast of the field which the Lord God has made. And he sai]d to the woman, [“Has God] really [Interrogative particle 4QGenk. Not in MT SP.] [said, ‘You shall not eat of any tree of] the garden?’ ” You should note that there are barely a handful of words which are readable in this verse (which is true throughout much of Genesis, where many complete verses cannot be discerned). In this particular verse, the superscript k may be a typo, as a majority of these are a, b and c, which would refer to the first, second or third manuscript (I assume of a particular book) to be taken from cave 4 (in this case). SP stands for the Samaritan Pentateuch.

Targum of Onkelos                And the serpent was wiser unto evil than all the beasts of the field which the Lord God had made. And he said to the woman, Is it truth that the Lord God hath said, You shall not eat of every tree of the garden?

Latin Vulgate                          Now the serpent was more subtle than any of the beasts of the earth which the Lord God had made. And he said to the woman: Why hath God commanded you, that you should not eat of every tree of paradise?

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And the serpent was crafty [and devious] from every animal of the field which had made Yehowah Elohim. And so he says unto the woman, “Indeed that has said, Elohim, ‘You [all] will not eat from every tree of the garden’?”

Peshitta (Syriac)                    NOW the serpent was more subtle than all the wild beasts that the LORD God had made. And the serpent said to the woman, Truly has God said that you shall not eat of any tree of the garden?

Septuagint (Greek)                Now the serpent was the most crafty of all the brutes on the earth, which the Lord God made. And the serpent said to the woman, Has God truly said, Eat not of every tree of the garden? This is actually Gen. 3:2 in the Greek Bible.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Knowledge, not eternal life

The snake was the most intelligent [Heb sounds like naked.] of all the wild animals that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, "Did God really say that you shouldn't eat from any tree in the garden?"

Contemporary English V.       The snake was sneakier than any of the other wild animals that the LORD God had made. One day it came to the woman and asked, "Did God tell you not to eat fruit from any tree in the garden?"

Easy English                          Now the snake was the most clever among all the wild animals that the *Lord God had made. The snake said this to the woman: `Did God say that you can eat the fruit from all the trees in the garden?'

Easy-to-Read Version            The snake was the most clever of all the wild animals that the Lord God had made. {The snake wanted to trick the woman.} The snake spoke to the woman and said, “Woman, did God really tell you that you must not eat from any tree in the garden?”

The Message                         The serpent was clever, more clever than any wild animal GOD had made. He spoke to the Woman: "Do I understand that God told you not to eat from any tree in the garden?"

New Berkeley Version           The serpent, wiliest of all the field animals the Lord God has made, said to the woman, “So, God has told you not to eat from any tree in the garden?”

New Century Version             The Beginning of Sin

Now the snake was the most clever of all the wild animals the Lord God had made. One day the snake said to the woman, "Did God really say that you must not eat fruit from any tree in the garden?"

New Life Bible                        Man Does Not Obey God

Now the snake was more able to fool others than any animal of the field which the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, "Did God say that you should not eat from any tree in the garden?"

New Living Translation           The Man and Woman Sin

The serpent was the shrewdest of all the wild animals the Lord God had made. One day he asked the woman, "Did God really say you must not eat the fruit from any of the trees in the garden?"


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Now, both of them (the man and the woman) were naked and unashamed.

The snake was the wiliest of the animals that Jehovah had made on the earth. And the snake asked the woman, 'Why did God tell you that you shouldn't eat from all the trees of Paradise?' These are the first two verses in the AEB (and in the Septuagint).

Ancient Roots Translinear      The serpent was the shrewdest of all the life of the field which Yahweh God made. He said to the woman, "Did God even say, 'Never eat of any tree of the garden?"

Beck’s American Translation Adam and Eve Sin

The snake was the smartest of all the wild animals the Lord God had made. He asked the woman, “Did God really say, ‘Don’t eat from any tree in the garden’?”.

God’s Word                         The snake was more clever than all the wild animals the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"

New American Bible              Expulsion from Eden.

Now the snake was the most cunning [Cunning: there is a play on the words for "naked" (2:25) and "cunning/wise" (Heb. `arum). The couple seek to be "wise" but end up knowing that they are "naked."] of all the wild animals that the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, `You shall not eat from any of the trees in the garden'?"

Revised English Bible            The serpent, which was the most cunning of all the creatures the Lord God had made, asked the woman, ‘Is it true that God has forbidden you to eat from any tree in the garden?’


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             Now the snake was wiser than any beast of the field which the Lord God had made. And he said to the woman, Has God truly said that you may not take of the fruit of any tree in the garden?

 

omplete Jewish Bible             Now the serpent was more crafty than any wild animal which ADONAI, God, had made. He said to the woman, "Did God really say, 'You are not to eat from any tree in the garden'?"

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 The Temptation of Eve

Now the Serpent was more impudent than any of the wild animals of the field which the Ever-living God had made. So, he asked the woman, “Is it true that God had said, you may not eat of every tree of the Garden?”

HCSB                                     Now the serpent was the most cunning of all the wild animals that the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, "Did God really say, 'You can't eat from any tree in the garden'?"

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               The two of them wre naked, the man and his wife, yet they felt no shame. Now the serpent was the shrewdest of all the wild beasts that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God really say: You shall not eat of any tree of the garden?” The JPS places Gen. 2:25 as the first verse of Gen. 3.

New Advent Bible                  Now the serpent was more subtle than any of the beasts of the earth which the Lord God had made. And he said to the woman: Why has God commanded you, that you should not eat of every tree of paradise?.

NET Bible®                             The Temptation and the Fall

Now [The chapter begins with a disjunctive clause (conjunction + subject + predicate) that introduces a new character and a new scene in the story.] the serpent [Many theologians identify or associate the serpent with Satan. In this view Satan comes in the disguise of a serpent or speaks through a serpent. This explains the serpent's capacity to speak. While later passages in the Bible may indicate there was a satanic presence behind the serpent (see, for example, Rev. 12:9), the immediate context pictures the serpent as simply one of the animals of the field created by God (see Gen. 3:1; Gen. 3:14). An ancient Jewish interpretation explains the reference to the serpent in a literal manner, attributing the capacity to speak to all the animals in the orchard. This text (Jub. 3:28) states, "On that day [the day the man and woman were expelled from the orchard] the mouth of all the beasts and cattle and birds and whatever walked or moved was stopped from speaking because all of them used to speak to one another with one speech and one language [presumed to be Hebrew, see Gen. 12:26]." Josephus, Ant. 1.1.4 (1.41) attributes the serpent's actions to jealousy. He writes that "the serpent, living in the company of Adam and his wife, grew jealous of the blessings which he supposed were destined for them if they obeyed God's behests, and, believing that disobedience would bring trouble on them, he maliciously persuaded the woman to taste of the tree of wisdom."] was more shrewd [The Hebrew word עָרוּם ('arum) basically means "clever." This idea then polarizes into the nuances "cunning" (in a negative sense, see Job. 5:12; Job. 15:5), and "prudent" in a positive sense (Prov. 12:16; Prov. 12:23; Prov. 13:16; Prov. 14:8; Prov. 14:15; Prov. 14:18; Prov. 22:3; Prov. 27:12). This same polarization of meaning can be detected in related words derived from the same root (see Ex. 21:14; Joshua 9:4; 1Sam. 23:22; Job. 5:13; Psalm 83:3). The negative nuance obviously applies in Genesis 3, where the snake attempts to talk the woman into disobeying God by using half–truths and lies.] [There is a wordplay in Hebrew between the words "naked" (עֲרוּמִּים, 'arummim) in Gen. 2:25 and "shrewd" (עָרוּם, 'arum) in Gen. 3:1. The point seems to be that the integrity of the man and the woman is the focus of the serpent's craftiness. At the beginning they are naked and he is shrewd; afterward, they will be covered and he will be cursed.] than any of the wild animals [Heb "animals of the field."] that the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, "Is it really true that [Heb "Indeed that God said." The beginning of the quotation is elliptical and therefore difficult to translate. One must supply a phrase like "is it true": "Indeed, [is it true] that God said."] God [God. The serpent does not use the expression "Yahweh God" [LORD God] because there is no covenant relationship involved between God and the serpent. He only speaks of "God." In the process the serpent draws the woman into his manner of speech so that she too only speaks of "God."] said, 'You must not eat from any tree of the orchard [Heb "you must not eat from all the tree[s] of the orchard." After the negated prohibitive verb, מִכֹּל (mikkol, "from all") has the meaning "from any." Note the construction in Lev. 18:26, where the statement "you must not do from all these abominable things" means "you must not do any of these abominable things." See Lev. 22:25 and Deut. 28:14 as well.]'?" When it comes to making an actual material change to the text, the NET Bible® is pretty good about indicating this. Since most of these corrections will be clear in the more literal translations below and within the Hebrew exegesis itself, I will not continue to list every NET Bible® footnote.

NIV – UK                                The fall

Now the snake was more crafty than any of the wild animals the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, `Did God really say, "You must not eat from any tree in the garden"?'


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

The Amplified Bible                NOW THE serpent was more subtle and crafty than any living creature of the field which the Lord God had made. And he [Satan] said to the woman, Can it really be that God has said, You shall not eat from every tree of the garden?

Concordant Literal Version    And the serpent comes to be the craftiest of all field life which was made by Yahweh Elohim. And saying is the serpent to the woman, "Indeed! Then the Elohim says, 'Not eat shall you from any tree of the garden'?

Updated Emphasized Bible    Now, the serpent, was more crafty than any living thing of the field which Yahweh God had made, so he said unto the woman, Can it really be that God has said, you will not eat of every tree of the garden?

English Standard Version      Now the serpent was more crafty than any other beast of the field that the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, "Did God actually say, 'You shall not eat of any tree in the garden'?"

English Standard V. – UK       The Fall

Now the serpent was more crafty than any other beast of the field that the Lord God had made.

He said to the woman, "Did God actually say, `You [In Hebrew you is plural in verses 1-5] shall not eat of any tree in the garden'?"

exeGeses companion Bible   Now the serpent

being more subtil than any live being of the field

Yah Veh Elohim worked,

he says to the woman, Has Elohim truly said,

Eat not of every tree of the garden?

LTHB                                     And the serpent was cunning above every animal of the field which Jehovah God had made. And he said to the woman, Is it true that God has said, You shall not eat from any tree of the garden?

Syndein/Thieme                     Now the serpent was more 'cunningly evil'/crafty than any lower creatures of the field which Jehovah/God Elohim/Godhead had manufactured {'asah - make something from something}. So, he {Satan through the serpent} said to the woman, "'Have you heard??'/'Is it really true??' . . . that Elohiym/Godhead has said, 'You shall not eat of every tree of the garden'? {implying unfairness of God}" {Note: One principal from this verse is 'the greatest terror against bible doctrine is CONVERSATION'. Do not let anyone mislead you! Also note that Satan does not call God 'Jehovah'! He recognizes the Supreme Being, but denies the relationship that comes with recognizing the Savior - Jesus Christ.}.

Young’s Updated LT             And the serpent has been subtle above every beast of the field which Jehovah God has made, and he says unto the woman, “Is it true that God has said, you do not eat of every tree of the garden?”

 

The gist of this verse:          Satan is the most intelligent and cunning creature to come from the hand of God. He asks the woman if it is true that God has told them that they could not eat from every tree in the garden.


Genesis 3:1a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

nâchâsh (שנָחָ) [pronounced naw-KHAWSH]

serpent, snake; image (of serpent); fleeing serpent (mythological)

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #5175 BDB #638

hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW]

to be, is, was, are; to become, to come into being; to come to pass

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #1961 BDB #224

ʿârûwm (עָרוּם) [pronounced ģaw-ROOM]

crafty, insidious, devious, shrewd; sensible, prudent, forethoughtful, farsighted, insightful, sagacious, prepared

masculine singular adjective

Strong’s #6175 (& #6191) BDB #791

This defines a person who is both insightful and is farsighted. This is certainly Satan, who is the most brilliant of all created creatures; yet this could also apply to a man with great foresight and insight. This would be just the antithesis of a person who would act on impulse (like Peter of the New Testament). This is the passive participle of Strong’s #6191.

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

kôl (כֹּל) [pronounced kohl]

every, each, all of, all; any of, any

masculine singular construct not followed by a definite article

Strong’s #3605 BDB #481

chayyâh (חַיָּה) [pronounced khay-YAWH]

living thing, animal, life, organisms, life form; appetite, revival, renewal; community, family, assembled group, allied families, bands

substantive; feminine singular

Strong's #2416 BDB #312

sâdeh (שָׂדֶה) [pronounced saw-DEH]

field, land, country, open field, open country

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #7704 BDB #961


Translation: Now the serpent was more insightful [and devious] than any animal of the field... This is an unusual beginning to a chapter. We have the “These are the generations of...” approach, as in Gen. 2:4 or 5:1; or the “And so it comes to pass that...” approach, as in Gen. 6:1. This is far less ceremonial than either of those approaches, and is found here and in Gen. 4:1 (among other places).


This is our first introduction to Satan, who appears in the form of a serpent to the woman. Whereas, most of us get the heebie jeebies around snakes, that was not the case in the garden. They would have seemed as sweet and adorable as any puppy dog that you have ever received in an email with some clever saying below it. There was absolutely nothing threatening to anyone when it came to the serpent.


On several occasions in the Bible (here, Isa. 14 and Ezek. 26), Satan is spoken of indirectly. That is, attributes are assigned to someone (something) else, which attributes belong to Satan. It is Satan who is crafty, insidious, devious, shrewd; not the serpent.


Throughout the Bible, God has allowed angels to manifest themselves as men, with similar human bodies to ours, bodies capable of having sex (Gen. 6) and capable of eating (Gen. 21). So, it is not necessary that Satan indwelt a serpent, but that he took upon the form of a serpent, which God had allowed him to do. The reason I would say this is, a serpent does not have the apparatus to speak; however, the form of a serpent, which Satan assumes, would have the proper ability to speak.


From this, Gen. 6 and the book of Job (specifically, Job 1–2), God has clearly given Satan a lot of leeway as to what he can do on earth among men. It is clear that God puts Satan on a fairly short leash with respect to that which he does. So, God, for a few centuries, might allow Satan and the fallen angels to take on the bodies of men, as He does in Gen. 6. However, that ability is taken off the table after Gen. 6, and is allowed from time to time to individual elect angels.


Now, you may wonder, why does God allow this? Why not simply allow the man and the woman to just live peacefully in the garden? You think this way because you are anthropocentric; you think about how this affects mankind and how it affects you personally. However, there is more to life than mankind.


In fact, this is the key to the book of Job: Job and his three friends, while Job is in great pain and suffering, sit around and discuss theology; and what seems to be their biggest problem in the application of true doctrine to Job’s situation is, they have ignored the Angelic Conflict. God created angels first, and then man. We are not created as something completely and totally separate from angelic creation. That is, we were created because a third of the angels fell; we were created because Satan fell, in his great arrogance. Apart from the angels, our lives make little sense.


Let me see if I can draw an analogy here. We’ve all seen movies, and movies are conceived of, scripted and then shot because the producers hope that there will be an audience for that movie. People do not spend money and time producing a movie that there will never be an audience for.


We are, in a sense, a movie that angels are watching. We are created by God with a purpose that angels will observe. If there was no audience of angels, then God would not have created us; our lives, as they stand now, would be meaningless. Now, to us, sure, our lives have great meaning, and many people can find a great deal in their lives apart from God and apart from the Angelic Conflict. However, we were not created just for ourselves (Rom. 4:7); and we were not created simply to fulfill our personal desires (James 4:3). This, to a limited degree, was understood by Cicero, who wrote, non nobis solum nati sumus ortusque nostri partem patria vindicat, partem amici ("We are not born, we do not live for ourselves alone; our country, our friends, have a share in us").


You might concede, at least temporarily, okay, I will give you that; now, so what? Satan has been judged (John 16:11). Satan will be thrown into the Lake of Fire (Rev. 20:10). Satan is appealing this sentence, quite obviously, because he is not yet in the Lake of Fire. So, what do we understand from this? Satan cannot leave well enough alone. He cannot leave the man and the woman alone in the garden, in innocence, without sin. He must jump into the middle of this.


When Jesus came into this world, Satan could not leave that alone. Although it is not plainly stated in Scripture, it is likely that Satan inspired Herod’s attempts to destroy the child-Messiah. Satan certainly attempted to tempt Jesus Christ in His humanity, to get Him to go against the plan of God.


Sin—rebellion against God—cannot coexist with innocence or with sinlessness. Sin will always look to corrupt innocence or sinlessness.


Let me give you a simple example: drugs. A person who starts using drugs will eventually have to pull others into this world of drug usage. He may or may not lie to get those he knows to take drugs, but needs to involve others. Those who sell drugs must ruin the lives of thousands of other people, in order for them to make a living selling drugs. A drug dealer cannot live off of 10 addicts.


Let me give you another example: homosexuality. In the past 40 years of my life, I have seen homosexual behavior go from being clearly understood to be a sin (say, in the 1950's and 1960's) to being seen as morally neutral, or very nearly morally neutral by a large number of people today. Although, I don’t believe that to be at 50%, I believe it is getting closer and closer to 50% in the United States. Given this, homosexuals can have their own bars, they can have their own “singles” websites; and they can hookup all that they want to. Now, one would think that, the ability to commit the sin of homosexual acts with one another would be enough. Furthermore, it is not that there is a lot of social constraint here. Most male homosexuals typically have sex with 500, 1000, 2000 and more partners in their lifetimes. So, even though there are a lot of churches out there, the church does not seem to really restrict adult males from engaging in homosexual acts.


And if two homosexuals want to marry, in almost any town of over 100,000 people, there can be found a church that will hold a marriage ceremony for any two homosexuals. Legally, in pretty much every state, there is a legal status which they can attain; or legal papers they can file, so that their legal rights with their significant other is similar to that of any normal, married couple. This is not enough. Homosexuals do not like being called sinners. There is a large enough of a minority in the homosexual community which would disallow the teaching of the Bible about homosexuality. There is also a large enough minority within the homosexual community which cannot leave our schools alone. Even before children are ready to think about sexuality, homosexuals want to be there infiltrating the schools. These groups would love to see a full-time paid position at every school of a special LGBT counselor to talk to kids about their thoughts and confusion. And they will want to counsel all kids that they can. Right now, their “in” to the schools is bullying. Most people believe that bullying is bad, so let’s have a bullying program; and, oh, by the way, this will include kids who are bullied (or teased) about homosexuality (again, offered at ages before children even known what homosexuality is; let alone sexuality). When it comes to sin, sinners cannot let well-enough alone. They must push their sin; parade their sin. And, in nearly every gay pride parade, there will be people acting out in ways that you would not want your own children to see.


It is impossible for homosexuals (and others who commit addictive sins) to simply leave things as they are. They must be moving forward. This means, no one can say negative things about homosexual behavior; no one can teach such things; and that homosexuals will have unfettered access to our public schools. They get there by means of the legalization of homosexual marriage. Now, in case you do not understand this, males are males are males, whether their sexual desires are toward females, other males or both. For a long period of time in a man’s life, they will have sexual lusts which they want to act on. When you put two male souls together, who are both attracted to males, you get typical male functions. Sex, with increasingly less emotional attachment; and a greater desire for more and more partners.


Now, let’s apply this to the Angelic Conflict. The obvious conclusion is, God cannot simply give Satan some planet off in another galaxy and let him and the other angels just hang out there. They must infect everyone with their rebellion (which will become clear in Gen. 6). If someone is sinless or in innocence, they must corrupt that person. This is the very nature of rebellion against God. Rebellion cannot be exercised alone.


All animals have some sort of intelligence, but the serpent was crafty because this is a manifestation of Satan (or in the alternative, a serpent indwelt by Satan). There is possibly even a bit of mockery and tongue-in-cheek here. The serpent is even smarter and craftier than the other members of the animal kingdom. This is a status achieved by Satan: craftier than the other animals. The word for crafty is ʿârûwm (עָרוּם) [pronounced ģaw-ROOM], and it means subtle, crafty, shrewd, cunning, sly and sensible. Whether it is used in a good sense or a bad sense is determined by context. It is found in Proverbs in a good sense. Satan's attack was certainly subtle. He attacks the woman. There are no threats, no attempt to cause her fear (which might not have been possible). He just talks to the woman; explores the thoughts of her soul. He wants to know how she feels. "This is your garden, honey, and God has not allowed you to eat from every tree? Now, just how do you feel about that?" This recorded passage is not every conversation that the woman had with Satan nor is it the entirety of this particular conversation. Since there is no indication that any animal ever spoke (nor do they have the vocal cords which have the ability to speak as we do), Satan then must have been allowed by God to either alter the vocal cords or to throw his voice, as it were. The first thing out of his mouth was certainly not about the tree. He had to talk to the woman so that she would not be frightened or confused because an animal was speaking to her and then he needed to get her confidence. This possibly involved several conversations prior to this time; or this could be midway through his first conversation with her. Satan is exceptionally brilliant and his attack on perfect environment had to be clever. He does not go to the man. He spots a vulnerability in the woman and exploits that vulnerability. He also has noticed that Adam is vulnerable through the woman. However, at this point, Satan may not care about Adam's decision. Whether Adam follows her in sin or whether he remains in a state of perfection; either outcome would very likely fit into Satan's incompletely formed plan. He just wants at least one of these creatures who occupy his one-time realm, to fall and sin against God. Satan speaking is in the Qal imperfect, indicating an ongoing conversation; however, God said is in the Qal perfect, implying a finality and a mandate which may not be altogether fair.


Now the serpent was more insightful [and devious] than any animal of the field... Although one might want to interpret this as meaning that the animal, the serpent, was more intelligent than any other creature of the field (which is perhaps true), the true meaning of this is, Satan is more intelligent and devious than any creature, bar none.


Gen. 3:1a reads: Now the serpent was more insightful [and devious] than any animal of the field...

22.   This is Satan’s first attack against mankind. He will tempt Adam and the woman to sin.


Genesis 3:1b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced uh-SHER]

that, which, when, who, whom

relative pronoun

Strong's #834 BDB #81

ʿâsâh (עָשָֹה) [pronounced ģaw-SAWH]

to do, to make, to construct, to fashion, to form, to prepare, to manufacture

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #6213 BDB #793

YHWH (יהוה) [pronunciation is possibly yhoh-WAH]

transliterated variously as Jehovah, Yahweh, Yehowah

proper noun

Strong’s #3068 BDB #217

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43


Translation: ...that Yehowah Elohim had made. With the previous phrase, we have Now the serpent was more insightful [and devious] than any animal of the field that Yehowah Elohim had made... God has created many creatures, both on earth and angelic. Here, we are told that Satan is the most intelligent creature to come from the hand of God. This also tells us that, Satan was created by God.


Genesis 3:1c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

It is typical in the Hebrew for each sentence—in fact, each thought—to begin with a wâw consecutive (or a wâw conjunction) in the Hebrew. However, it is not necessary in an English translation to include a connective at every such juncture, as our language does not necessarily require that for successive thoughts or actions.

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

ʾîshshâh (אִשָּה) [pronounced eesh-SHAW]

woman, wife

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #802 BDB #61


Translation: He said unto the woman,... The man and the woman are in innocence. This is difficult for us to relate to, but it is like being both 4 and 40 at the same time. We have the innocence of age 4, when we ask our parents every question in the book until they finally say, “Shut up with all your questions, kid” or “Mommy’s got to concentrate on her driving now” or “Because I said so.” The world to us, at that time, seems to be a magical place. At age 4, if a flying saucer came down in our backyard, we’d very likely run up the plank to see what was going on. It may seem unusual to us, but not that unusual. At that age, it would not occur to us to say, “Holy crap, mom, come look at this! I’ve never seen anything like it!”


So, that the serpent speaks to the woman does not throw her off her game. This does not strike her as unusual. The serpent perhaps never spoke to her before (and perhaps he did), but this was not something that seemed wildly crazy. She did not feel like she had to run to Adam and tell him about this; there was no fear.


We have no idea if this occurs for the first time here, or whether Satan began coming to the woman and engaging her in conversation, scurrying off, saying, “Let’s keep this conversation a secret, just between us, okay?” If there is a past, we don’t know about it.


In any case, the woman is innocent and sinless. She is unable to make a morally wrong decision, apart from eating from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Therefore, whatever led up to her decision to eat from this tree, none of it can be considered sinful.


Now, could she be committing sins, which we not sins to her in innocence? That is, could she be arrogant and make some self-centered arrogant choices? This is a fairly difficult and sophisticated question, and one which may not really lead us anywhere; but my guess is, apart from the tree, she was like Jesus, in that, she was able not to sin and she was not able to sin (in Latin, this is posse non peccare and non posse peccare). So, in my estimation, she did not sin and she was not able to sin. She was unable to do anything that could be interpreted as a sin. Therefore, whatever motivation she has leading up to eating from the fruit of the forbidden tree, none of that could properly be called sinful.


Genesis 3:1d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʾaph (אַף) [pronounced ahf]

in fact, furthermore, also, yea, even, indeed

conjunction

Strong’s #637 BDB #64

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

Together, these two conjunctions mean in fact, more than; but also; but even; much more; how much more [when an affirmation precedes]; how much less [when a negation precedes]; is it even so. According to BDB, in a question, these mean indeed [is it] that. Let me suggest, in a question, that this would mean is it indeed true that, is it really true that, do I understand correctly that.

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

According to Gesenius, this should be is it even so that God has said; has God so said.

The Amplified Bible: Can it really be that God has said...

Concordant Literal Version: Then the Elohim says...

Rotherham: Can it really be that God has saidIndeed!

ESV: Did God actually say...

Exegesis Companion Bible: Has Elohim truly said...

R. B. Thieme, Jr.: 'Have you heard??'/'Is it really true??' . . . that Elohiym/Godhead has said...

Young: Is it true that God has said...


Translation:...“Indeed [is it really true] that Elohim has said,... Satan, on the other hand, has fallen, and will use any sort of evil to cause pain and suffering to the human race. All this lame stuff in the garden that Adam and the woman are doing, infuriate him. They are not strong, they are not on his intellect level, they have very limited powers with regards to the physical universe. Watching their lives might be like an in-your-face gay man would react to being forced to watch every episode of Ozzie and Harriet, Donna Reed and Father Knows Best. These two wimpy and stupid creatures infuriated Satan, and what God saw in them was beyond him.


Satan was the most beautiful and intelligent creature to come from the hand of God; so what God sees in these two rubes is beyond his comprehension. But God has allowed Satan to mess with them, and so he will.


You will note the first attack in the garden is upon the Word of God. “Did God really say this?” “Is this what God said?” “Can this really be true that God said this?” He wants to confuse the woman, and distort the words of God. Therefore, Satan will distort, every so slightly, what God said to her (or what God said to the man; we do not know if God told the woman this or if she had knowledge of it apart from the man).


Genesis 3:1e

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʾal (אַל) [pronounced al]

no, not; nothing; none; neither, nor; do not, let not [with a verb];; let there not be [with an understood verb];

adverb of negation; conjunction of prohibiting, dehorting, deprecating, desire that something not be done

Strong’s #408 BDB #39

This is the first time in the Bible that the adverb of negation occurs.

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #398 BDB #37

The plural can take in both masculine and feminine things; so this refers both to Adam and the woman.

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

kôl (כֹּל) [pronounced kohl]

every, each, all of, all; any of, any

masculine singular construct not followed by a definite article

Strong’s #3605 BDB #481

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171


Translation:...‘You [all] will not eat from every tree of the garden’?” Satan’s questions are directed to the woman while she is in the garden alone, but these questions are about her and Adam. The serpent is not interested in only the woman; he is interested in the rules as they apply to Adam.


Satan improperly quotes God’s Word back to the woman. What God said was this: And Yehowah Elohim commanded the man, saying, “You may freely eat [lit., eating, you may eat] from every tree of the garden, but you will not eat from the Tree of Knowledge [of] good and evil, for in the day that you eat from it, dying, you will die.” So, the complete version here is, God told the man that he could eat from every tree of the garden, but there is this one exception.


Satan knew exactly what God had told the man and the woman. One way in which he makes a negative impact on the world is, he distorts God’s clear commands. This is often Satan’s approach, to distort or to misapply the Word of God. When tempting the humanity of Jesus Christ, Satan improperly applied several verses in order to try to get the Lord to do his bidding.


Satan here, subtly implies that God has somehow shortchanged Adam and the woman. God has not really given them all that he should have given them. I mean, “Really, you cannot eat from EVERY tree in this garden?”


Gen 3:1 The snake was more clever than all the wild animals the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"


The name of the serpent is quite fascinating: it is nâchâsh (נָחָש) [pronounced naw-KHAWSH], which means serpent. Strong’s #5175 BDB #638. You can hear the hissing of the snake when you pronounce this word. This is very closely related to the verb nâchash (נָחַש) [pronounced naw-KHAHSH], which means to practice divination, to divine; to communicate with demons; to whisper. Strong's #5172 BDB #638. I would guess that the noun came first, and the verb was based upon this noun.


The adjective used to describe the serpent here is ʿârûwm (עָרוּם) [pronounced ģaw-ROOM], which means; sensible, prudent, forethoughtful, farsighted, insightful, sagacious, prepared. Strong’s #6175 (& 6191) BDB #791. The serpent is called more clever than all of the life forms because Satan indwelt this snake. This is why the serpent was more shrewd and devious than the other animals. God did not create snakes with a greater intellectual capacity than other animals; but this snake, under Satan’s control, was extremely intelligent.


Satan’s question is not just clever, but he already knows the answer he will get, which we will examine next time.


Apparently, Satan, who indwelt the serpent, waited until the woman was alone, and then he spoke to her. As we studied last time, Satan, who was created as the greatest of all angels, had fallen from grace, becoming arrogant because of his own beauty and intelligence.


Gen 3:1 The snake was more clever [= crafty, insidious, devious, shrewd] than all the wild animals the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"


None of the animals had ever talked to Adam or the woman before. However, the woman does not appear to be startled or taken aback by this. Now, I don’t know if you can recall back to your youth, but there was a time when you were young when almost anything seemed possible. For the first couple years of your life, anything that you wanted was just given to you. You learned how to do that. Your wants were rather limited, but whatever it was, your parents seemed to figure out what it was and took care of you. A few years past this, and life’s possibilities seemed infinite. We do not know how long Adam and the woman had lived on this earth; and they certainly did not know what was possible and what was not. So, even though this serpent began to speak to the woman, it did not shock or surprise her. Furthermore, the woman was incapable of fear. There is nothing which would happen which would cause the woman to fear.


We don’t know where Adam is at this point in time, but the Garden of Eden was huge, and he was probably several miles away at this time engaged in some project. Adam looked forward to working in this garden each day. Adam and the woman are both quite intelligent, so it is even likely that they even built tools to work with by this time.


Notice how Satan speaks to the woman; he poses a question to which he already knows the answer. “God didn’t really tell you that you could not eat from any tree in the garden?” This is what a lawyer does. A lawyer will ask a series of questions leading to a set of answers which he wants to hear. Here, Satan wants to lead the woman and her thinking in a particular direction. This is how all false systems of thinking begin—religions, philosophies, world-views—with a distortion of the Word of God.


When speaking of God, Satan uses the word Elohim, but he does not use the personal name Jehovah (Yehowah). Satan no longer has the relationship with God which we as believers have. When we believed in Jesus Christ, we were saved and saved forever. We cannot lose our salvation. We may get out of fellowship from time to time, but we do not lose our personal relationship with Him. Satan has no such personal relationship with God; Satan has been condemned by God. The amount of evil which Satan is willing to do will be laid out throughout all human history.


Islamic terrorists give us a contemporary clue as to how much evil Satan is willing to commit. Since newspapers and television news seem reluctant to bring to you all that radical Muslims are actually doing every single day, let me suggest www.thereligionofpeace.com. The actions of the Nazis in their hatred of the Jews and their desire to destroy the Jews give us an historical perspective as to how far Satan is willing to take things. Their willingness to destroy the lives of millions of Jews as if their lives are meaningless give us an idea of just how far Satan is willing to go when it comes to inflicting pain and misery upon the human race. What we observe here in the garden may seen fairly academic and bloodless, but the end result is going to be a mountain of suffering inflicted upon the human race, which can all be traced back to Satan.


Indeed is the Hebrew word ʾaph (אַף) [pronounced ahf] and it is a conjunction which introduces a new, emphatic thought. It can be translated also, indeed, really. Thieme renders this conjunction is it really true that. Satan does not even refer to the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. He will allow the woman to bring it up. He is speaking as though he has heard this rumor and he's just curious whether or not it is true.


Gen 3:1b He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"


In the English, our 2nd person masculine singular pronoun is identical to our 3rd person masculine singular pronoun. Those in the south have sought to correct it with you’all and those in the north offer up the weaker youse guys, but in literary English there is no difference. The Hebrew differentiates between these. Throughout these first several verses, even though Satan is talking to just the woman, he includes Adam in all that he said. Literally, Satan asked the woman, “Indeed, did God say, ‘You [both] will not eat from every tree of the garden’?”


——————————


The woman answers the serpent:


And so says the woman unto the serpent, “From fruit of a tree of the garden, we eat.

Genesis

3:2

The woman then answered the serpent, “We eat from the fruit of the trees [lit., tree] in the garden.

The woman then answered the serpent, “We may eat from the fruit of the trees in the garden.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And the woman said to the serpent, From the rest of the fruits of the trees of the garden we have power to eat;...

Latin Vulgate                          And the woman answered him, saying: Of the fruit of the trees that are in paradise we do eat.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says the woman unto the serpent, “From fruit of a tree of the garden, we eat.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And the woman said to the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of all the trees of the garden;...

Septuagint (Greek)                And the woman said to the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden,...

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           The woman said to the snake, "We may eat the fruit of the garden's trees...

Contemporary English V.       The woman answered, "God said we could eat fruit from any tree in the garden,...

Easy English                          This is how the woman answered the snake. `We can eat the fruit from the trees in the garden.

Easy-to-Read Version            The woman answered the snake, “{No! God did not say that!} We can eat fruit from the trees in the garden.

Good News Bible (TEV)         "We may eat the fruit of any tree in the garden," the woman answered,...

The Message                         The Woman said to the serpent, "Not at all. We can eat from the trees in the garden.

New Berkeley Version           The woman answered the serpent, “We may eat the fruit of the garden’s trees;...

New Living Translation           "Of course we may eat fruit from the trees in the garden," the woman replied.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And the woman replied to the snake, 'We can eat the fruit from the trees of Paradise,... The AEB and the LXX both have this and the completion of this sentence as v. 3.

Ancient Roots Translinear      The woman said to the serpent, "We eat of the fruit trees of the garden,...

Beck’s American Translation “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden,” the woman answered the snake.

God’s Word                         The woman answered the snake, "We're allowed to eat the fruit from any tree in the garden...


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And the woman said, We may take of the fruit of the trees in the garden: ...

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 And the woman replied to the serpent, “We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the Garden;...

New Advent Bible                  And the woman answered him, saying: Of the fruit of the trees that are in paradise we do eat:...

NET Bible®                             The woman said to the serpent, "We may eat [There is a notable change between what the LORD God had said and what the woman says. God said "you may freely eat" (the imperfect with the infinitive absolute, see Gen. 2:16), but the woman omits the emphatic infinitive, saying simply "we may eat." Her words do not reflect the sense of eating to her heart's content.] of the fruit from the trees of the orchard;...

NIV – UK                                The woman said to the snake, `We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden,...


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Concordant Literal Version    And saying is the woman to the serpent, "From the fruit of the trees of the garden we are eating,...

exeGeses companion Bible   And the woman says to the serpent,

We eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden:...

LTHB                                     And the woman said to the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden,...

Syndein                                  {Woman's Vulnerability in Satan's Distortion - First Woman's Sexual Revolution Begins - Rejecting Authority of God and Her Right Man}

And the woman replied to the serpent, "From the fruit of the trees of the garden we may eat."

Young’s Updated LT             And the woman says unto the serpent, “Of the fruit of the trees of the garden we do eat,...

 

The gist of this verse:          The woman responds to the serpent, telling him that they could eat from the trees of the garden.


Genesis 3:2a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person feminine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾîshshâh (אִשָּה) [pronounced eesh-SHAW]

woman, wife

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #802 BDB #61

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

nâchâsh (שנָחָ) [pronounced naw-KHAWSH]

serpent, snake; image (of serpent); fleeing serpent (mythological)

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #5175 BDB #638


Translation: The woman then answered the serpent,... The serpent speaks with feigned respect to the woman, so the woman speaks with genuine respect back to the serpent, not really knowing who he is.


Genesis 3:2b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

perîy (פְּרִי) [pronounced peree]

fruit, produce (of the ground); fruit, offspring, children, progeny (of the womb); fruit (of one’s actions, labor)

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6529 BDB #826

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #398 BDB #37


Translation:...“We eat from the fruit of the trees [lit., tree] in the garden. The word for tree is often used as a collective; therefore, we can translate this word, trees, forest, forest of trees. The woman eats the fruit from these trees every day. So she testifies clearly to the serpent that she and the man eat from the trees in the garden.


Gen 3:2 The woman answered the snake, "We're allowed to eat the fruit from any tree in the garden.”


The snake knows this. Ever since God created the man and the woman, Satan has been watching with intent interest. He knows what the prohibition is, and he wants to confuse the woman as to what is true and what is not.


Satan added a very specific question: "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?" The woman sticks up for God. She tells Satan that she can eat the fruit of any fruit-bearing tree in the garden but one.


——————————


And from fruit of the tree which [is] in a midst of the garden, said Elohim, ‘You will not eat from it and you will not touch in it lest you die.’ ”

Genesis

3:3

But from the fruit of the tree which [is] in the midst of the garden, Elohim has said, ‘You [both] will not eat from it nor will you [both] touch it, lest you [both] die.’ ”

But of the fruit of the tree which is in the middle of the garden, God has said, ‘You both may not eat from it nor can you even touch it, or you will both die.’ ”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                ...but of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden the Lord hath said, You shall not eat of it, nor approach it, lest you die

Latin Vulgate                          But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of paradise, God hath commanded us that we should not eat; and that we should not touch it, lest perhaps we die.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And from fruit of the tree which [is] in a midst of the garden, said Elohim, ‘You will not eat from it and you will not touch in it lest you die.’ ”

Peshitta (Syriac)                    But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God has said, You shall not eat of it, neither shall you touch it, lest you die.

Septuagint (Greek)                ...but of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God said, You shall not eat of it, neither shall you touch it, lest you die.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           ...but not the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden. God said, `Don't eat from it, and don't touch it, or you will die.'"

Contemporary English V.       ...except the one in the middle. He told us not to eat fruit from that tree or even to touch it. If we do, we will die."

Easy English                          But God said, "You must not eat the fruit from a certain tree. That tree is in the middle of the garden. Do not even touch it, otherwise you will die." '

Easy-to-Read Version            But there is one tree we must not eat from. God told us, ‘You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden. You must not even touch that tree or you will die.’”

Good News Bible (TEV)         ..."except the tree in the middle of it. God told us not to eat the fruit of that tree or even touch it; if we do, we will die."

The Message                         It's only about the tree in the middle of the garden that God said, 'Don't eat from it; don't even touch it or you'll die.'"

New Century Version             But God told us, 'You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden. You must not even touch it, or you will die.' "

New Life Bible                        But from the tree which is in the center of the garden, God has said, 'Do not eat from it or touch it, or you will die.' "

New Living Translation           "It's only the fruit from the tree in the middle of the garden that we are not allowed to eat. God said, `You must not eat it or even touch it; if you do, you will die.'"


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          ...but God said that we shouldn't eat the fruit from the tree in the middle of Paradise - that we shouldn't even touch it - or we will die.'

Ancient Roots Translinear      ...but God said of the fruit tree in the midst of the garden, 'Never eat it and never touch it--otherwise you will die!"

Beck’s American Translation “But God did say, ‘Don’t eat of the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden, and don’t touch it, or yoiu will die.’ ”

Christian Community Bible     ...but of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden God said: You must not eat, and you must not touch it or you will die.”

God’s Word                         ...except the tree in the middle of the garden. God said, 'You must never eat it or touch it. If you do, you will die!'"

New American Bible              ...it is only about the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden that God said, `You shall not eat it or even touch it, or else you will die.'" Gn 2:17; Rom 6:23.

New Jerusalem Bible             But of the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden God said, "You must not eat it, nor touch it, under pain of death." '

Revised English Bible            ...except for the tree in the middle of the garden. God has forbidden us to eat the fruit of that tree or even to touch it; if we do, we shall die.’


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             But of the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden, God has said, If you take of it or put your hands on it, death will come to you.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 ...but of the fruit of the tree which is in the middle of the Garden, God has said, ‘do not eat of it, and do not even touch it, lest you die.’ ”

HCSB                                     But about the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden, God said, 'You must not eat it or touch it, or you will die.'"

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               It is only about fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden that God said: ‘You shall not eat of it or touch it, lest you die.’ ”

New Advent Bible                  But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of paradise, God has commanded us that we should not eat; and that we should not touch it, lest perhaps we die.

NET Bible®                             ...but concerning the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the orchard God said, 'You must not eat from it, and you must not touch it [And you must not touch it. The woman adds to God's prohibition, making it say more than God expressed. G. von Rad observes that it is as though she wanted to set a law for herself by means of this exaggeration (Genesis [OTL], 86).], or else you will die [The Hebrew construction is פֶּן (pen) with the imperfect tense, which conveys a negative purpose: "lest you die" = "in order that you not die." By stating the warning in this way, the woman omits the emphatic infinitive used by God ("you shall surely die," see Gen_2:17).].' "

NIV – UK                                ...but God did say, "You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die."'


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

The Amplified Bible                Except the fruit from the tree which is in the middle of the garden. God has said, You shall not eat of it, neither shall you touch it, lest you die.

Concordant Literal Version    ...yet from the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, the Elohim says, `Not eat of it shall you, and not touch it shall you, lest you be dying.

Context Group Version          ...but of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God has said, You { pl } shall not eat of it, neither shall you { pl } touch it, or else you { pl } will die.

English Standard Version      ...but God said, 'You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the midst of the garden, neither shall you touch it, lest you die.'"

Heritage Bible                        And concerning the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God has said, You shall not eat of it, and you shall not touch it, lest you die.

Syndein                                  "But from the fruit of the tree which is in the middle of the garden, Elohiym/Godhead has said {allegedly}, 'You shall not eat from it, neither shall you touch it {mistake!}, lest you die.'" {Note: The woman misquoted God's instructions - God did not say not to 'touch' the fruit . . . only not to eat it. She is not 'sharp' in her soul. Maybe she was negative to the word or lack of concentration on the teaching. The danger was in negative volition in the soul not in contact with the tree. And, under the influence of Satan, now she called 'Jehovah Elohiym' just Elohiym . . .}

Young’s Updated LT             And of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden God has said, you do not eat of it, nor touch it, lest you die.”

 

The gist of this verse:          The woman recounts that God said, “You cannot eat from the tree nor touch it, or you will die.” The second restriction was not given by God.


Genesis 3:3a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

The wâw conjunction is used as ➊ a simple copulative, used to connect words and sentences, in which case it is usually rendered and. ➋ It can be used to explain one noun or clarify one noun with another, in which case it is rendered even or yea (see Job 5:19 Dan. 4:10). ➌ The wâw conjunction can introduce two nouns, where the first is the genus and the second is the species; in which case, we would render it and particularly, and specially, and namely, and specifically (and it can be used the other way as well) (see 2Kings 23:2 Psalm 18:1 Isa. 1:1 2:1 Zech. 14:21). ➍ It can be prefixed to a verb also by way of explanation; it could be reasonably rendered as a relative pronoun (who, which) (see Gen. 49:25 Job 29:12 Isa. 13:14). ➎ It can be used to begin an apodosis (the then portion of an if...then... statement) (see Gen. 2:4, 5 40:9 48:7). ➏ It is used between words and sentences in order to compare them or to mark their resemblance (1Sam. 12:15 Job 5:7). ➐ When doubled, it can mean both...and... (Num. 9:14 Joshua 7:24 Psalm 76:7). ➑ It can be prefixed to adversative sentences or clauses and rendered but, and yet, although, otherwise (Gen. 2:17 15:2 17:20 Judges 16:15 Ruth 1:21 Job 15:5 6:14). ➒ And, what we were after, is the wâw conjunction can be used in disjunctive sentences; that is, it can be rendered or (which will help us to understand what Jephthah does) (Ex. 21:17 Lev. 5:3 Deut. 24:7). ➓ Finally, the wâw conjunction can be used before causal sentences and rendered because, for, that, in that (Gen. 18:32 30:27 Psalm 5:12 60:13); before conclusions or inferences, and therefore rendered so that, therefore, wherefore (2Kings 4:41 Isa. 3:14 Ezek. 18:32 Zech. 2:10); and before final and consecutive sentences, which mark an end or an object: in order that (Gen. 42:34 Job 20:10 Isa. 13:2). To paraphrase Gesenius, frequently, it is put after verbs and sentences standing absolutely, especially those which imply time or condition and is reasonably rendered then.

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

perîy (פְּרִי) [pronounced peree]

fruit, produce (of the ground); fruit, offspring, children, progeny (of the womb); fruit (of one’s actions, labor)

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6529 BDB #826

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

ʾăsher (אֲֹשֶר) [pronounced uh-SHER]

that, which, when, who, whom

relative pronoun

Strong's #834 BDB #81

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

tâveke (תָּוֶ) [pronounced taw-VEKE]

midst, among, middle

masculine singular construct

Strong's #8432 BDB #1063

With the bêyth preposition, tâveke can mean in the middle of, in the midst of; into, among. In the Hebrew, this is spelled בְּתוֹך׃. With the 2nd person masculine plural suffix, it can mean in your midst, among you. with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix, it can mean in their midst, among them.

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article; pausal form

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171


Translation: But from the fruit of the tree which [is] in the midst of the garden,... The woman then focuses upon a specific tree, and, apparently, this tree stands out. I have no idea how large this garden was, whether this was a few acres or many square miles, but the woman does not even name this tree. She does not call it the Tree of Knowing Good and Evil. It is simply the tree in the middle of the garden. I am not sure how you understand a garden to be, but in any large garden, it is difficult to pick out a tree in the middle of a garden. Furthermore, the words here, in the midst of, there is no clearly defined, exact middle. That is, one could not take the woman’s description here and find the tree. My point here is, the woman appears to be hesitant to even name the tree; to even specify it.


“There is this tree towards the middle of the garden...” is roughly what she is saying.


Genesis 3:3b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal perfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

lôʾ (לֹא or לוֹא) [pronounced low]

not, no

negates the word or action that follows; the absolute negation

Strong’s #3808 BDB #518

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

2nd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #398 BDB #37

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

This is an odd form of min, where it appears to be doubled with a suffix added to it; however, Gesenius lists this right up front as one of the legitimate spellings of min.


Translation: ...Elohim has said, ‘You [both] will not eat from it... I have inserted the word both. You is in the masculine plural, and you all would correctly translate this; however, you all includes only two people, the man and the woman. Therefore, I have rendered the plural suffix you both.


God has said is also somewhat vague. First of all, God is spoken of less personally here; His title is used, but not His name. Secondly, the woman does not say, “God said to the man...” or “God said to us...” Therefore, it would not be a stretch to say, “God gave the command...” or “God has commanded...”


Genesis 3:3c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

lôʾ (לֹא or לוֹא) [pronounced low]

not, no

negates the word or action that follows; the absolute negation

Strong’s #3808 BDB #518

Although I cannot find justification for this, it seems reasonable that in a list of things which some cannot do, the wâw conjunction plus the negation together may be translated nor.

nâgaʿ (נָגַע) [pronounced naw-GAHĢ]

to touch, to reach into; to violate, to injure; to come to a person; to strike

2nd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #5060 BDB #619

This verb is often followed by a bêyth preposition.

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #88

pen (פֶּן) [pronounced pen]

lest, peradventure, or else, in order to prevent, or, so that [plus a negative]

conjunction

Strong's #6435 BDB #814

mûwth (מוּת) [pronounced mooth]

to die; to perish, to be destroyed

2nd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #4191 BDB #559


Translation: ...nor will you touch it, lest you die.’ ” Then the woman, apparently having a doctrinal breakthrough, says, “Nor will you touch it...” which God did not say.


The woman reveals that either she has not been listening or she has had a doctrinal breakthrough which she has been dying to share with someone. God never said anything about touching the tree. This reminds me of the story Garrison Keilor would tell about the pump handle in back of the grade school in winter. If you put your tongue on it, your spit would freeze and you might have to stay there all winter. Therefore, the younger kids, fully aware of these consequences would not go back there unless they had to, and if they did, they would keep their mouths firmly shut at all times. So the woman thought that she had better not even touch it. The property of death was not inherent in the tree but in her volition with respect to the tree. She does not mention the title of the tree, and she is even a little confused on the doctrine of what will actually happen. She does not say in dying you will die, she merely says that you will be dying. This is in the imperfect voice, so that incomplete action is implied. Satan knows that he has her now. She has misquoted God's Word. She does not even have the gist of it. This indicates that she is not paying close attention in Bible class. Even Satan will correctly quote God's Word (and then negate it).


Again, God’s exact words were: And Yehowah Elohim commanded the man, saying, “You may freely eat [lit., eating, you may eat] from every tree of the garden, but you will not eat from the Tree of Knowledge [of] good and evil, for in the day that you eat from it, dying, you will die.”


So, the woman paraphrased what was said. We do not know if God gave this particular command to the woman; God clearly gave it to the man. Throughout the command, we have 2nd person masculine singular suffixes or verbs. Whether God gave this command to the woman or not, we do not know. However, since the command was given to the man before the woman was made, this command applied to both the man and the woman.


What I would reasonably guess is, this command was clearly given to man. Man, as the authority over the woman, conveyed this command to the woman.


There appears to be a regular time when God spoke to the man, and possibly to the woman. That will be the intimation of Gen. 3:8, when God comes to them in the breeze of the day, suggesting that God did this regularly.


As all of this occurs, always bear in mind that the woman has no sin nature and she is unable to sin. In all of this conversation, despite not recalling the Word of God exactly, she has not sinned. There is only one sin that she can commit, and that is eating from the Tree of Knowing Good and Evil.


Gen 3:2–3 The woman answered the snake, "We're allowed to eat the fruit from any tree in the garden except the tree in the middle of the garden. God said, 'You must never eat it or touch it. If you do, you will die!'"


This was exactly what Satan was looking for. He needed for the woman to express an incorrect understanding of the Word of God. This would give Satan an opening which he could exploit.


Adam and the woman had been given one prohibition to test their volition. There was the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil in the midst of the garden, and they were told not to eat from it. God told them, "But you must never eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil because when you eat from it, in dying, you will die." This means that they would die two deaths--they would die spiritually—they would be separated from God right then and there—and they would also eventually die physically, as a result of their spiritual death. In addition to this, God would no longer allow them near the Tree of Life so that they did not perpetuate their lives separated from God.


God gave the man and the woman free will, so there must be some choice offered to them to test their free will with respect to God. They have to have some way to choose against God from a state of perfection, or, otherwise, they do not have true free will.


Now, you will note that the woman did not listen very carefully to Jesus (the Revealed Member of the Trinity) teaching them in the garden. To be fair, it may have been Adam who taught this to the woman, as he was her authority. They were only prohibited from eating the fruit of that tree; God never said anything about touching it. She made that up on her own (or, perhaps, Adam added, “It is better that you do not even touch that tree or its fruit”). In any case, someone had added to the Word of God.


The last words she says are interesting as well: “You [plural] will die.” She is only quoting a portion of what was told to her. She was told, “Dying, you [plural] will die.” In this way, she was taking away from the Word of God.


——————————


And so says the serpent unto the woman, “Not dying, you will [not] die;...

Genesis

3:4

The serpent then said to the woman, “[In] dying, you will not die;...

The serpent then answered the woman, “In dying, you will not die;...


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                In that hour the serpent spoke accusation against his Creator, and said to the woman, Dying you will not die; for every artificer hates the son of his art:...

Latin Vulgate                          And the serpent said to the woman: No, you shall not die the death.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so says the serpent unto the woman, “Not dying, you will [not] die;...

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And the serpent said to the woman, You shall not surely die;...

Septuagint (Greek)                And the serpent said to the woman, You shall not surely die!

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Contemporary English V.       "No, you won't!" the snake replied.

Easy-to-Read Version            But the snake said to the woman, “You will not die.

Good News Bible (TEV)         The snake replied, "That's not true; you will not die.

The Message                         The serpent told the Woman, "You won't die.

New Life Bible                        The snake said to the woman, "No, you for sure will not die!

New Living Translation           "You won't die!" the serpent replied to the woman.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Then the snake told the woman, 'You won't stop living and die,...

Ancient Roots Translinear      The serpent said into the woman, "You will not ||die||!

Beck’s American Translation “You’re not going to die,’ the snake told the woman.

God’s Word                         "You certainly won't die!" the snake told the woman.

NIRV                                      "You can be sure that you won't die," the serpent said to the woman.

Revised English Bible            ‘Of course you will not die,’ said the serpent.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And the snake said, Death will not certainly come to you:...

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 But the serpent answered the woman: “You will not die;...

HCSB                                     "No! You will not die," the serpent said to the woman.

New Advent Bible                  And the serpent said to the woman: No, you shall not die the death.

NET Bible®                             The serpent said to the woman, "Surely you will not die [The response of the serpent includes the infinitive absolute with a blatant negation equal to saying: "Not - you will surely die" (lo' mot tÿmutun). The construction makes this emphatic because normally the negative particle precedes the finite verb. The serpent is a liar, denying that there is a penalty for sin (see John 8:44).] [Surely you will not die. Here the serpent is more aware of what the Lord God said than the woman was; he simply adds a blatant negation to what God said. In the account of Jesus' temptation Jesus is victorious because he knows the scripture better than Satan (Matt 4:1-11).],... The full NET Bible translation, without footnotes, is: The serpent said to the woman, "Surely you will not die,...


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Concordant Literal Version    And saying is the serpent to the woman, "Not to die shall you be dying,...

Context Group Version          And the serpent said to the woman, You { pl } shall not surely die:...

English Standard Version      But the serpent said to the woman, "You will not surely die.

Heritage Bible                        And the snake said to the woman, Dying, you shall not die,...

Syndein                                  And the serpent {while possessed by Satan} said unto the woman, "Emphatically! You will NOT die." {Note: Satan through the instrumentality of the possessed serpent, is denying a relationship between sin and 'dying'.. The woman is thinking physical death (which she only knows from doctrine taught to her), but the true meaning of spiritual death is too close for Satan so he lies to her here! In Rev 12:9, Satan is called 'the serpent'.}.

A Voice in the Wilderness      And the serpent said to the woman, You shall not die the death.

Young’s Updated LT             And the serpent says unto the woman, “Dying, you will not die,...

 

The gist of this verse:          Satan tells the woman that she will not die.


Genesis 3:4a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

nâchâsh (שנָחָ) [pronounced naw-KHAWSH]

serpent, snake; image (of serpent); fleeing serpent (mythological)

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #5175 BDB #638

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

ʾîshshâh (אִשָּה) [pronounced eesh-SHAW]

woman, wife

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #802 BDB #61


Translation: The serpent then said to the woman,... Satan’s attack upon the man and the woman goes first to the woman, as second in command. Satan needs for her to rebel; for her to take a principled stand in favor of eating the fruit from all the trees.


Genesis 3:4b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

lôʾ (לֹא or לוֹא) [pronounced low]

not, no

negates the word or action that follows; the absolute negation

Strong’s #3808 BDB #518

mûwth (מוּת) [pronounced mooth]

to die; to perish, to be destroyed

Qal infinitive absolute

Strong's #4191 BDB #559

mûwth (מוּת) [pronounced mooth]

to die; to perish, to be destroyed

2nd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #4191 BDB #559


Translation:...“[In] dying, you will not die;... Satan begins with a negative, which is not unusual, and then repeats what God had said to the man, except with the 2nd person masculine plural verb. He is, more or less saying, “No...” or “Not true...” following by dying, you will [both] die.


Dying is used twice in this verse. It is used in exactly the way Yahweh Elohim used the verb in Gen. 2:17. It is first found in the Qal infinitive absolute along with a negative, and then in the Qal imperfect second masculine plural. An infinitive absolute acts as a verbal noun and it can be used to intensify a meaning or to complement a meaning. We have come to a full understanding of spiritual and temporal death, and therefore translate these two words in a state of death, you will begin to die. Satan adds a negative to the Qal infinitive absolute, and could be cumbersomely translated, It is not true that in a state of death you will die. This could be shortened to in dying, you will not die. Note also that when God spoke these words originally to Adam, the suffix was the second masculine singular; however, when Satan speaks to the woman, he uses the second masculine plural, telling her that neither she nor Adam would die. Thieme, at one time, gave the rather free translation, "the wages of sin isn't death, honey; eat".


Gen 3:4 "You certainly won't die!" the snake told the woman.


Satan lies to the woman. Literally what he says is, “Not dying, you will die.” The negative may be reasonably applied to the repetition of this verb: “Not dying, you will [not] die.” The serpent actually corrects her at this point. He gives her a direct quote (but with the negative), which I am sure she recognizes. When she hears the doubling of the verb, as God spoke originally, she recognized that this Serpent was quite clever and must know what he is talking about.


Have you ever known someone who could speak with authority and he sounded extremely intelligent and charming, and you simply wanted to believe whatever he told you? Some people just have that natural charisma. Satan is the most beautiful creature in the universe (although the woman cannot see that) and he is the most intelligent creature in the universe. He is charismatic and interesting to talk to.


We do not completely know the thinking of Satan. Does he fully realize that pain and anguish that this will cause? Does he think in his own soul this is the best thing to do? I gave the example before, when one child offers his best friend drugs, he is not thinking, “I really want for you to screw up your life.” That is where this can lead, but that is not necessarily the intention of the friend. How far forward is Satan able to look? This man and woman are a brand new thing on this earth. As a chess player, how many moves in advance is Satan able to see? In any case, Satan does this for his own self-interest. He may justify that he is doing this for the other angels that fell, but Satan caused them to fall through his charm, beauty and intelligence, and specifically for his own ends, to make a point.


What is that point? “God, You design corruptible creatures; therefore, You ought to allow us all to live.” Satan is under judgment, which we have discussed earlier. He and the fallen angels have already been condemned to the Lake of Fire, where they will burn forever. Since that sentence has not been carried out, Satan has obviously appealed this verdict.


The idea that Satan appeals his sentence to God is based upon the fact that Satan has already been judged, but God has not yet carried out the sentence against him. Furthermore, given the almost courtroom-type atmosphere found in Job 1:6–12 2:1–6, and Satan’s ability to object to God’s testimony, it is not a great leap to suggest that Satan objected to his sentence, appealed to God, and God granted him his appeal, which appeal is played out in human history.

Although we have covered these before, I have listed below some of Satan’s appeals (there were probably many specific appeals as well, as well as a much longer list than I have been able to come up with).

The Basis of Satan’s Appeals

1.      How can a loving God cast any of His creatures into a Lake of Fire?

2.      Satan to God: “God, You made me this way. I am not responsible for Your creation.” God is at fault for not making a perfect creation. If Satan is imperfect, then it must mean that God is imperfect.

3.      “The creatures You have designed, God, are all prone to sin. This indicates a faulty design. Since You, God, made all creatures this way, You ought to allow them free expression and You ought to allow all Your creatures to live.”

4.      Satan’s sin is originally one of pride, which was discovered by God; how can a hidden sin like this deserve eternal death? How is this just?

5.      Can’t a God of love forgive His creatures?

6.      Let’s accept the premise that Satan and the fallen angels have sinned. Why not just give Satan some little space in the universe and let him and the other fallen angels hang out there?

7.      Elect angels have chosen this path simply because God rewards them for their choice.

8.      Essentially, Satan’s objections call into question God’s actions in comparison to His character and essence. God has to be consistent, as He is immutable. God is righteous and just, so His judgment has to be righteous and just. God is love, so His actions should reflect His love.

9.      There are inherent contradictions in God’s character (creating beings which will suffer forever in the Lake of Fire does not demonstrate love or righteousness). Therefore, the inherent defects in Satan’s character cannot be judged by Someone with inherent defects. In other words, if Satan is imperfect, then God is imperfect. God is unable to demonstrate perfect character in all respects at all times (that is the argument of Satan).

10.    Right and wrong are relative concepts; there really is no such thing as absolute standards of right and wrong. The acts of Satan and those angels who fell are not inherently wrong, because there is no such thing as inherent wrong.

11.    Right and wrong, good and bad, are simply arbitrary standards, set up by God.

12.    God is incapable of creating creatures with free will who will not, at some point in time, disobey Him.

13.    When Adam and Eve fell, there was a change in the environment; Satan may have alleged that the problem is with the environment as much as it is with anything else.

14.    FInally, Satan, in a sense, alleges, “I could do a better job than God with this earth and with His creatures.” He said, “I will be like the Most High.” (Isa. 14:14b).

In this chapter, Satan will show that His creatures all sin, indicating that he, Satan, ought to be running things. Bear in mind that Satan has never created any living creature before, he has never had authority over these new creatures, and yet he proposes that he is able to be equal to God.


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


Let me make an application here: maybe you have been drawn to a person because they were charming, attractive and intelligent? Maybe you wanted to date someone like that. Maybe you have observed people like that and you wanted to be their friend. Maybe you have voted for a person with those qualities. Maybe you have followed a religious leader with these qualities. These are qualities which Satan possesses. These qualities alone will not make someone a good friend, a good husband (or wife), or even a good president. What is lacking? Character. Personal integrity. Quite obviously, in this world of sin, no person is perfect. However, if you are able to recognize true personal integrity in another person, this is far more important than charm, attractiveness and intelligence.


As has been pointed out, Satan is extremely intelligent, and, like an excellent chess player, he might be able to look forward to many possible permutations of moves. However, his foresight is limited. God, on the other hand, knows the end from the beginning (Isa. 46:10). He knows the result of every free will choice that every single person and creature will make. And God has perfect integrity. His character is made up of truth, love, justice and righteousness.


The most intelligent, charming, and personable creature in the universe (apart from God) will now lie to the woman.


Gen 3:4 "You certainly won't die!" the snake told the woman.


Satan also includes Adam in this statement. The word you comes from the 2nd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect of the verb to die. Literally, what Satan says is, “Not dying, you [both you and Adam] will [not] die.” His every word is carefully crafted. He needs for the woman to think in terms of herself and Adam. He wants Adam to make a clear, unadulterated, free will choice against God. Satan is intentionally deceiving the woman; but he needs for Adam to choose against God without being deceived.


Here, Satan denies that there is a relationship between sin—disobeying God—and dying. This carries over today, but in a slightly different form. We are all fallen creatures now. We are born with a sin nature. It is a part of our genetic code. We will all die physically. Today, Satan does not want us to pay attention or to think about the results of sin. “If you are good you go to heaven and if you are bad you go to hell,” is a lie from Satan. When we sin, there are always negative results, but going to hell is not one of them. Faith in Christ eliminates hell (the Lake of Fire) from your future; no believer will be under eternal judgment. However, every believer or unbeliever who sins will have a negative affect upon himself and upon those around him.


Satan is charming; he is incredibly intelligent; and he is the most beautiful creature in the universe. However, as fallen, Satan lacks integrity. He cannot leave Adam and the woman alone; he attacks the woman, the weaker vessel; and he lies to her. If you can think of a person who is extremely intelligent, very attractive and extraordinarily charming—and if this person has lied right to your face—he has looked you straight in the eye, and with great sincerity and charm, has flat out lied to you—told you things which he knew were flat out false—then you have an idea of what Satan is like. You may still like that person. You may be enamored of that person. But without integrity, that person ought not to be your friend, your spouse, your pastor or your political representative at any level. He or she will just use you to get whatever it is that they want.


Let’s recap the first 4 verses:


Gen 3:1 The snake was more clever [= crafty, insidious, devious, shrewd] than all the wild animals the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You [and Adam] must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"


Although Satan begins by speaking to the woman, he intends for Adam to make a free will choice against God, without being deceived.


Gen 3:2–3 The woman answered the snake, "We're allowed to eat the fruit from any tree in the garden except the tree in the middle of the garden. God said, 'You must never eat it or touch it. If you do, you will die!'"


For whatever reason, the woman has two problems in her understanding here: God never said anything about touching the tree, and God warned her, “Dying, you will die.” She both adds to the Word of God and she takes from the Word of God. Here is where Satan sees his opening. He says:


Gen 3:4 "Not dying, you [and Adam] will not die!" the snake told the woman.


The woman recognizes this phrase, except Satan adds the negative. It sounds as if Satan knows what he is talking about, as he uses the verb twice, just as God and Adam had.


——————————


Satan continues lying to the woman:


...for knowing Elohim that in a day of your eating from him and opened your [two] eyes and you [both] are like Elohim, knowers of good and evil.”

Genesis

3:5

...for Elohim knows that in the day of your eating from the tree [lit., from it], that your eyes will be opened and you are [then] like Elohim, knowing good and evil.”

...for God knows that in that day that you eat from the tree that your eyes will be opened and you will then be like God, knowing both good and evil.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                ...for it is manifest before the Lord, that in the day that you eat of it, you will be as the great angels, who are wise to know between good and evil.

Latin Vulgate                          For God does know that in what day soever you will eat thereof, your eyes will be opened: and you will be as Gods, knowing good and evil.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        ...for knowing Elohim that in a day of your eating from him and opened your [two] eyes and you [both] are like Elohim, knowers of good and evil.”

Peshitta (Syriac)                    For God knows that in the day you eat of it, your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be like gods, knowing good and evil.

Septuagint (Greek)                For God knew that in whatever day you should eat of it, your eyes would be opened, and you would be as gods, knowing good and evil.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           God knows that on the day you eat from it, you will see clearly and you will be like God, knowing good and evil."

Contemporary English V.       "God understands what will happen on the day you eat fruit from that tree. You will see what you have done, and you will know the difference between right and wrong, just as God does."

Easy English                          God knows that if you eat the fruit from that tree you will learn about good and evil. And then you will be the same as God!”

Easy-to-Read Version            But when you eat the fruit, your eyes will open. God knows that. You will be like God and you will know right things and wrong things.'

Good News Bible (TEV)         God said that because he knows that when you eat it, you will be like God and know what is good and what is bad."

The Message                         God knows that the moment you eat from that tree, you'll see what's really going on. You'll be just like God, knowing everything, ranging all the way from good to evil."

New Century Version             God knows that if you eat the fruit from that tree, you will learn about good and evil and you will be like God!"

New Life Bible                        For God knows that when you eat from it, your eyes will be opened and you will be like God, knowing good and bad."

New Living Translation           "God knows that your eyes will be opened as soon as you eat it, and you will be like God, knowing both good and evil."


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          ...for God knows that on whatever day you eat from it your eyes will be opened wide and you will be like gods knowing good and evil.'

Ancient Roots Translinear      For God knows the day you eat from it, your eyes will unseal, and you will be as God, knowing good and evil."

God’s Word                         "God knows that when you eat it your eyes will be opened. You'll be like God, knowing good and evil."

New American Bible              God knows well that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened and you will be like gods, who know [Like gods, who know: or "like God who knows."] good and evil." Wis 2:24; Sir 25:14; Is 14:14; Jn 8:44; 2 Cor 11:3.

NIRV                                      "God knows that when you eat the fruit of that tree, you will know things you have never known before. You will be able to tell the difference between good and evil. You will be like God."

Revised English Bible            ‘...for God knows that, as soon as you eat it, your eyes will be opened and you will be like God himself, knowing both good and evil.’


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             For God sees that on the day when you take of its fruit, your eyes will be open, and you will be as gods, having knowledge of good and evil.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 ...but God knows at the time you eat of it, your eyes will then be opened, and you will be like God, acquainted with both good and evil.”

HCSB                                     "In fact, God knows that when you eat it your eyes will be opened and you will be like God, knowing good and evil."

JPS (Tanakh—1985)               ...but God knows that as soon as you eat of it your eyes will be opened and you will be like divine beings who know [Others “God, who knows.”] good and bad.”

Judaica Press Complete T.    For God knows that on the day that you eat thereof, your eyes will be opened, and you will be like angels, knowing good and evil."

New Advent Bible                  For God knows that in what day soever you shall eat thereof, your eyes shall be opened: and you shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil.

NET Bible®                             ...for God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will open [Or "you will have understanding." This obviously refers to the acquisition of the "knowledge of good and evil," as the next statement makes clear] and you will be like divine beings who know [Or perhaps "like God, knowing." It is unclear how the plural participle translated "knowing" is functioning. On the one hand, ??????? (yodÿ'e) could be taken as a substantival participle functioning as a predicative adjective in the sentence. In this case one might translate: "You will be, like God himself, knowers of good and evil." On the other hand, it could be taken as an attributive adjective modifying ???????? ('elohim). In this case ???????? has to be taken as a numerical plural referring to "gods," "divine beings," for if the one true God were the intended referent, a singular form of the participle would almost certainly appear as a modifier. Following this line of interpretation, one could translate, "You will be like divine beings who know good and evil." The following context may favor this translation, for in 3:22 God says to an unidentified group, "Look, the man has become like one of us, knowing good and evil." It is probable that God is addressing his heavenly court (see the note on the word "make" in 1:26), the members of which can be called "gods" or "divine beings" from the ancient Israelite perspective. (We know some of these beings as messengers or "angels.") An examination of parallel constructions shows that a predicative understanding ("you will be, like God himself, knowers of good and evil," cf. NIV, NRSV) is possible, but rare (see Gen 27:23, where "hairy" is predicative, complementing the verb "to be"). The statistical evidence strongly suggests that the participle is attributive, modifying "divine beings" (see Ps 31:12; Isa 1:30; 13:14; 16:2; 29:5; 58:11; Jer 14:9; 20:9; 23:9; 31:12; 48:41; 49:22; Hos 7:11; Amos 4:11). In all of these texts, where a comparative clause and accompanying adjective/participle follow a copulative ("to be") verb, the adjective/participle is attributive after the noun in the comparative clause.] good and evil [You will be like divine beings who know good and evil. The serpent raises doubts about the integrity of God. He implies that the only reason for the prohibition was that God was protecting the divine domain. If the man and woman were to eat, they would enter into that domain. The temptation is to overstep divinely established boundaries. (See D. E. Gowan, When Man Becomes God [PTMS], 25.)]."


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

American KJV                        For God does know that in the day you eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be as gods, knowing good and evil..

The Amplified Bible                For God knows that in the day you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing the difference between good and evil and blessing and calamity.

Concordant Literal Version    ...for the Elohim knows that, in the day you eat of it, unclosed shall be your eyes, and you become as the Elohim, knowing good and evil

Context Group Version          ...for God knows that in the day you { pl } eat, then your { pl } eyes shall be opened, and you { pl } shall be as God, knowing good and evil.

exeGeses companion Bible   ...for Elohim knows that in the day you eat thereof,

then your eyes open

and you, being as Elohim, know good and evil.

Green’s Literal Translation    ...for God knows that in the day you eat of it, even your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be as God, knowing good and evil.

Heritage Bible                        Because God knows by seeing that in the day you eat from it, then your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be as God, knowing by seeing good and evil.

New RSV                               ...for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God [Or gods], knowing good and evil.'

Syndein                                  {Satan Appealing to the Woman's Pride - Desire to be 'God-like'}

"For Elohiym/God keeps on knowing that in the day you eat from it, THEN {the moment God supposedly fears!} your eyes shall be opened, and you shall become like the Elohiym/Godhead . . . knowing good and evil." {Note: Satan tells her God is trembling in heaven for fear that she might become as smart as He is. What a lie that one is! And, desire for 'Equality' is Satan's own lie. No two men are exactly 'equal'. The closest we come is at each person's point of salvation. At that one point, we have equal opportunity to take in the Word and GROW spiritually. But, then again based on your level of positive volition, we will become unequal again.}.

World English Bible                ...for God knows that in the day you eat it, your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil."

Young’s Updated LT             ...for God does know that in the day of your eating of it—your eyes have been opened, and you have been as God, knowing good and evil.”

 

The gist of this verse:          Satan tells the woman that God realizes that, when she eats of the forbidden fruit, she will be like God, knowing both good and evil.


Genesis 3:5a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

yâdaʿ (יָדַע) [pronounced yaw-DAHĢ]

knowing, knowing by experience [or practice]; skilled; seeing; recognizing, admitting, acknowledging

Qal active participle

Strong’s #3045 BDB #393

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

yôwm (יוֹם) [pronounced yohm]

day; time; today (with a definite article)

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #3117 BDB #398

When followed by an infinitive, this can be rendered in the day in which, in the day when, in the day that; when.

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

Qal infinitive construct with the 2nd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #398 BDB #37

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

This is an odd form of min, where it appears to be doubled with a suffix added to it; however, Gesenius lists this right up front as one of the legitimate spellings of min.


Translation: ...for Elohim knows that in the day of your eating from the tree [lit., from it],... The serpent (Satan) continues speaking to the woman. The woman knows the name of that tree, and Satan tells her what will happen when she eats from the tree. It is certainly legitimate to render this, ...for God knows that in the day that you eat from it,...


Genesis 3:5b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

pâqach (פָּקַח) [pronounced paw-KAHKH]

to be opened; receiving opening

3rd person plural, Niphal perfect

Strong’s #6491 BDB #824

ʿêynayim (עֵינַיִם) [pronounced ģay-nah-YIM]

eyes, two eyes, literal eye(s), spiritual eyes; face, appearance, form; surface

feminine dual noun with the 2nd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #5869 (and #5871) BDB #744


Translation: ...that your eyes will be opened... In the world of the man and the woman, there was no good or evil. They did not have a sin nature, and, as long as they did not eat from the Tree of Knowing Good and Evil, their lives would be good; or, should I say, enjoyable.


One of the things that many parents try to keep their children from is the evil that is in the world. They attempt to preserve their innocence, which is something which is getting more and more difficult to do. We want them to play and learn, and we want to keep them from the many things that are out there that could corrupt them (drugs, crime, alcohol, sex).


This is God’s attitude toward the man and the woman. There was only one way they could become corrupted, and that was to do the one thing God told them not to do.


Genesis 3:5c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW]

to be, is, was, are; to become, to come into being; to come to pass

2nd person masculine plural, Qal perfect

Strong's #1961 BDB #224

kaph or ke (כְּ) [pronounced ke]

like, as, just as; according to; about, approximately

preposition of comparison or approximation

No Strong’s # BDB #453

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

yâdaʿ (יָדַע) [pronounced yaw-DAHĢ]

knowing, knowing by experience [or practice]; skilled; seeing; recognizing, admitting, acknowledging

masculine plural construct, Qal active participle

Strong’s #3045 BDB #393

ţôwb (טוֹב) [pronounced tohbv]

pleasant, pleasing, agreeable, good, better; approved

masculine singular adjective which can act like a substantive

Strong’s #2896 BDB #373

As a noun, this can mean the good thing, that which is good [pleasing, approved, kind, upright, right]; goodness, uprightness, kindness, right; that which is fair [beautiful].

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

raʿ (רַע) [pronounced rahģ]

evil, bad, wicked; evil in appearance, deformed; misery, distress, injury; that which is displeasing [disagreeable, unhappy, unfortunate, sad]

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #7451 BDB #948


Translation: ...and you are [then] like Elohim, knowing good and evil.” What Satan is saying here is, essentially, true; that Adam and the woman would see things in a whole different light if they ate from the forbidden tree.


This is the beginning of false religion. God has a clearly revealed will here. There is no mistaking what He has told Adam and the woman. Just as there is no mistaking what we are told over and over again in the New Testament: believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved. I have put together roughly 4–5 pages of verses which say basically that. That is probably the most basic mandate of the Bible yet cults and religion deny it; they deny the Lord who bought them, and substitute in a set of works. Adam and the woman had one negative mandate to test their volition, and it was to not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Satan, as the father of religion, ignores or distorts God's revealed truth and offers in replacement his own works or theology. He has told the woman that she will come to be as smart as God. He does not deny that the tree will provide the knowledge of good and evil; but that the result of knowing good and evil will be different than that which God outlined.


Let me offer an analogy: parents will protect their children as long as they can from the way that the world is. There is no need to expose them to obscene language or to profanity; no need for them to be confused by excessive violence or by the misuse of sex; no need for them to be faced with drugs. Parents will try to keep these things from their children as long as possible, even though these things are found out there in the real world. It is impossible to keep a child from these things for their entire life because we do live in the devil's world and we are faced with his distortions of God's provisions daily; however, most parents, if they could protect their children from association with any of these things up until the child is 14 or 18 or even 21, they would. There is no need for our children to be faced at a young age, in innocence, as it were, to inappropriate language, violence, sex and drugs. We certainly, as the time comes, give outlines of mandates concerning these things. This is analogous to Yahweh God in the garden with Adam and the woman. They had no need to be faced with Satan's fall or Satan's system or Satan's religions. God had provided them a perfect, idyllic existence in the Garden of Eden. They had everything they needed and what Satan did or thought was not an issue to them; just as the immorality or viciousness of humankind is not an issue to a four-year-old child..


Although speaking just to the woman, Satan includes the man in on these conversations. All of the second person references and suffixes are in the plural. He said, "You [plural] will be like God [plural]; knowers of good and evil." As Thieme has said many times; the woman did not become as smart as God; she instead found out how smart God was. So the woman goes up and inspects the tree carefully. In one verse we find a change in life as has never been seen since in human history. In the space of a few minutes, the bodies fo Adam and the woman will change, the world will change, and corruption, degeneration and decay will become a part of life.


There is an implication here, and this is a misperception of many people: that there is something out there which confines God (beyond the confines of His Own perfect character). Some think—whether they express this or not—that there are things in this universe which are older, more powerful and/or exist outside of God’s plan or sovereignty. Take this tree, for instance. Satan is implying that, this tree provides more than God is willing to give to the woman. God should have given the woman the ability to know good and evil, but He short-changed her here. But, there is this tree here, and that tree will give her what she needs and desires. It is as if this tree here exists completely apart from God, something that He has no control over. She has the opportunity to take from it, before Adam returns, and to find out for herself. It is as if she can step outside of God’s control and enter into a place that God does not have any control over.


Satan’s promise that this tree will give these things to the woman implies that God has chosen to withhold these things from the woman, but luckily, there is this tree here to give the woman the chance to have these things. It is as if God is unable to remove this tree; it is as if this tree is more powerful than God. It is as if this tree goes beyond God.


Here is the first lesson of evil: Satan cannot just let this go. He cannot meander off to some other side of the universe and hang out with his buddies, the other fallen angels. Satan sees as his mission to corrupt the man and the woman. This will be focus of his mission. Evil looks to corrupt others.


A person who takes drugs, for instance, cannot simply take drugs. At some point, he will become more involved. He will become evangelistic about drug use, and corrupt friends; or he may deal drugs, which means, in order for him to make a good living, he must corrupt hundreds and even thousands of others.


Gen 3:5 "God knows that when you eat it your eyes will be opened. You will be like God, knowing good and evil."


Your Bible may read, “You will be like the gods.” The word here is ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM], which means God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; and it is often transliterated Elohim. Strong's #430 BDB #43. This is the exact same word as we found in Gen. 3:1 as well as at the beginning of this verse. At no time in the Bible previous to this is Elohim used to mean gods. Therefore, we are reasonably speaking about God and not about angels or heathen gods. In fact, there is no indication that Adam and Eve know anything about angelic creation.


Even Satan appears to Eve as a lowly snake, not in all of his own beauty. She has no clue as to how beautiful Satan is; nor does she have any clue as to how vicious and evil Satan is. As a serpent, he appears quite harmless to her. After all, she has dominion over the animals.


Lies are far more effective when the truth is mixed in. You cannot tell a story where everything is a lie. You slip in a little truth here and there—particularly truth which the hearer knows about—and interweave that with lies. This tree is called the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. So, whatever good and evil are, this tree is related to that. So, what Satan says here is accurate; when the man and the woman eat of this tree, their eyes will be opened; they will go from innocence to knowing good and evil, as God does. Satan mixes in a little truth with the lies.


One of the things hidden in the Hebrew is, the 2nd person suffixes here are all plural. So that we understand this in the English, we might better understand Satan to say:


Gen 3:5 "God knows that when you [both] eat it your eyes [the eyes of Adam and Eve] will be opened. You will [both] be like God, knowing good and evil."


Satan implants into this woman’s brain that she will eat from this tree and then Adam will eat from this tree. This is a psychological ploy to get the woman to think beyond just herself eating from the tree. The entire human race will be affected here. We will all be able to distinguish good and evil. What Satan is saying here is truthful.


Sin is insidious. It takes a little truth and mixes in some lies, and presents it to us. Sin is persistent. Satan has access to a universe so huge that our minds are unable to comprehend its size, yet Satan focuses his energies right here in this garden on earth with the woman who is innocent. Evil cannot just let innocence be.


One of the reasons that child molestation is viewed with such contempt—even by criminals—is, the attack is made against a child who is innocent. It is an affront to our sensibilities. Most everyone can relate back to that time of innocence as a child, and it is particularly heinous to take that away from a child. This is exactly what Satan did to the woman. She was perfectly innocent; he was corrupt; and he corrupted her innocence. If you need to understand how evil this is, think of this as the rape of an innocent child. In essence, that is what Satan is doing. He is going to take away the innocence of this woman.


Gen 3:5 "God knows that when you [both] eat it your eyes [the eyes of Adam and Eve] will be opened. You will [both] be like God, knowing good and evil."


Satan refers to both Adam and the woman, as this will be a choice that they will both make. He is not so much trying to get the woman to offer the fruit to Adam after she eats from the tree (as she will do), but for her to see this as something which she and Adam do as a couple. Satan knows that once the woman eats, Adam will have to eat. His emotions will overwhelm him. He loves this woman more than anything else in the world, and he is not willing to let her go. Adam knows that there is no one else in the world meant for him. He will be willing to join her in disobeying God.


We also have the phrase here, “Your eyes will be opened.” The idea is, the woman would have the knowledge that God has. She is not blind, but she is deficient in her knowledge—or so Satan tells her. Eating from the fruit of this tree will give her a greater understanding than she now has; she will be like God, and she and Adam will be discerners of good and evil (this is literally what Satan said), just like God. This is appealing and it sounds greatly empowering.


——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Fall: the Man and the Woman Succumb


At this point, the serpent steps back; he lets the woman carefully examine the tree and draw some conclusions for herself.


And so sees the woman that good the tree for food and that a delight this to the eyes and desirous the tree to look at. And so she takes from his fruit and so she eats and so she gives also to her man with her and so he eats.

Genesis

3:6

The woman observed that the tree was good for food and that this [tree] was a delight to the eyes and the tree was desirable to look at [possibly, desirable to instruct]. Therefore, she took from its fruit and she ate [it]; then she also [or, she indeed] gave [some] to her husband with [possibly, near, by, against, beside] her and he also ate [it].

The woman observe that the tree was good for food, that this tree was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was desirable to look at. Therefore, she took some of its fruit and she ate it. Then she also gave some fruit to her husband beside her and he also ate it.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And the woman beheld Sammael, the angel of death, and was afraid; yet she knew that the tree was good to eat, and that it was medicine for the enlightenment of the eyes, and desirable tree by means of which to understand. And she took of its fruit, and did eat; and she gave to her husband with her, and he did eat.

Latin Vulgate                          And the woman saw that the tree was good to eat, and fair to the eyes, and delightful to behold: and she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave to her husband, who did eat.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so sees the woman that good the tree for food and that a delight this to the eyes and desirous the tree to look at. And so she takes from his fruit and so she eats and so she gives also to her man with her and so he eats.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and that the tree was delightful to look at, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and she also gave to her husband with her; and he did eat.

Septuagint (Greek)                And the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes to look upon and beautiful to contemplate, and having taken of its fruit she ate, and she gave to her husband also with her, and they ate.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           The woman saw that the tree was beautiful with delicious food and that the tree would provide wisdom, so she took some of its fruit and ate it, and also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.

Contemporary English V.       The woman stared at the fruit. It looked beautiful and tasty. She wanted the wisdom that it would give her, and she ate some of the fruit. Her husband was there with her, so she gave some to him, and he ate it too.

Easy-to-Read Version            The woman saw the tree was beautiful. She saw the fruit was good to eat. And it was exciting that the tree would make her wise. So the woman took fruit from the tree and ate it. Her husband was there with her, so she gave some of the fruit to him and he ate it.

Good News Bible (TEV)         The woman saw how beautiful the tree was and how good its fruit would be to eat, and she thought how wonderful it would be to become wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. Then she gave some to her husband, and he also ate it.

The Message                         When the Woman saw that the tree looked like good eating and realized what she would get out of it--she'd know everything!--she took and ate the fruit and then gave some to her husband, and he ate.

New Berkeley Version           The woman saw the tree as being good for food, delightful to the eye and a tree desirable to render one wise, so she took of its fruit and ate; she also gave to her husband, who atre with her.

New Living Translation           The woman was convinced. She saw that the tree was beautiful and its fruit looked delicious, and she wanted the wisdom it would give her. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. Then she gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it, too.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Well, the woman saw that the tree was good for food, it was a pleasant sight to her eyes, and it was a beautiful thing to think about. So, after picking its fruit, she ate it. Then she gave some to her husband (who was with her), and they ate it [together].

Ancient Roots Translinear      The woman saw the good meat of the tree, and her eyes desired it and craved for comprehension from the tree. She took and ate the fruit, and also gave to her man with her. He ate, and...

Beck’s American Translation When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good to eat, a dlight to look at, and what anyone would want in order to get wise, she took some of its fruit and ate it. Then she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.

God’s Word                         The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, nice to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.

New Jerusalem Bible             The woman saw that the tree was good to eat and pleasing to the eye, and that it was enticing for the wisdom that it could give. So she took some of its fruit and ate it. She also gave some to her husband who was with her, and he ate it.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and a delight to the eyes, and to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit, and gave it to her husband.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 So the woman perceiving that the tree was good for food, and beautiful to the eyes, and a tree stimulating to the intellect, she took some of its fruit and ate it, and gave some to her husband with her; and he also ate it.

HCSB                                     Then the woman saw that the tree was good for food and delightful to look at, and that it was desirable for obtaining wisdom. So she took some of its fruit and ate it; she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.

 

NET Bible®                             When [Heb "And the woman saw." The clause can be rendered as a temporal clause subordinate to the following verb in the sequence.] the woman saw that the tree produced fruit that was good for food [Heb "that the tree was good for food." The words "produced fruit that was" are not in the Hebrew text, but are implied.], was attractive [The Hebrew word ???????? (ta'avah, translated "attractive" here) actually means "desirable." This term and the later term ??????? (nekhmad, "desirable") are synonyms.] [Attractive (Heb "desirable").desirable. These are different words in Hebrew. The verbal roots for both of these forms appear in Deut 5:21 in the prohibition against coveting. Strong desires usually lead to taking.] to the eye, and was desirable for making one wise [Heb "that good was the tree for food, and that desirable it was to the eyes, and desirable was the tree to make one wise." On the connection between moral wisdom and the "knowledge of good and evil," see the note on the word "evil" in 2:9.] [Desirable for making one wise. The quest for wisdom can follow the wrong course, as indeed it does here. No one can become like God by disobeying God. It is that simple. The Book of Proverbs stresses that obtaining wisdom begins with the fear of God that is evidenced through obedience to his word. Here, in seeking wisdom, Eve disobeys God and ends up afraid of God.], she took some of its fruit and ate it [The pronoun "it" is not in the Hebrew text, but is supplied (here and also after "ate" at the end of this verse) for stylistic reasons.] [She took.and ate it. The critical word now discloses the disobedience: "[she] ate." Since the Lord God had said, "You shall not eat," the main point of the divine inquisition will be, "Did you eat," meaning, "did you disobey the command?" The woman ate, being deceived by the serpent (1 Tim 2:14), but then the man ate, apparently willingly when the woman gave him the fruit (see Rom 5:12, 17-19).]. She also gave some of it to her husband who was with her, and he ate it [This pericope (3:1-7) is a fine example of Hebrew narrative structure. After an introductory disjunctive clause that introduces a new character and sets the stage (3:1), the narrative tension develops through dialogue, culminating in the action of the story. Once the dialogue is over, the action is told in a rapid sequence of verbs - she took, she ate, she gave, and he ate.].


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

The Amplified Bible                And when the woman saw that the tree was good (suitable, pleasant) for food and that it was delightful to look at, and a tree to be desired in order to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she gave some also to her husband, and he ate.

Concordant Literal Version    And seeing is the woman that the tree is good for food, and that it brings a yearning to the eyes, and is to be coveted as the tree to make one intelligent. And taking is she of its fruit and is eating, and she is giving, moreover, to her husband with her, and they are eating.

Darby Translation                  And the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a pleasure for the eyes, and the tree was to be desired to give intelligence; and she took of its fruit, and ate, and gave also to her husband with her, and he ate.

English Standard Version      So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate, and she also gave some to her husband who was with her, and he ate.

English Standard V. – UK       So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise [Or to give insight], she took of its fruit and ate, and she also gave some to her husband who was with her, and he ate.

exeGeses companion Bible   And the woman sees the tree is good for food

and desirable to the eyes

and a tree to desire to comprehend;

and she takes of the fruit thereof and eats;

and also gives to her man with her; and he eats.

Heritage Bible                        And because the woman saw [saw, good, etc.; towb, is the same word that is used throughout the Bible for the goodness of God, and what is good in His eyes. The fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was not good for food, but she saw it, ra’ah, as good for food. She ate it, and gave also to her husband with her, and he ate, because that is the way she saw it. The fruit was not desirable, chamad, delightful, precious. She only saw it to be delightful because she had received the words of Satan, and those were the only words her soul was using, in spite of the fact that God gave her His words. It was not a tree to crave to make one intelligently successful, ta’avah sakal, but she saw it as a tree to crave to make her intelligently successful, again because the words her soul was using were the words Satan gave her, and she completely ignored the words God gave her through her husband. If she had used God’s words through her husband, she would have seen none of these things this way. If she had used God’s words as the words she manipulated for her logic, she would have seen it as poison, undesirable, and repulsive and destructive because it gave knowledge that destroyed the human by a prolonged death, both temporal and eternal. What Eve yielded to was the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, 1 John 2:16. This is how all sin enters the heart. Every man is dragged away by his own passion, and entrapped, which produces sin in his soul, by words from Satan and humans, and is deceived. Jas 1:14-15. See Note Lev 17:11.] the tree good for food, and because she saw it as a delight to the eyes, and a tree craved to make one intelligently successful, she took from its fruit, and ate, and gave also to her mortal man [mortal man, enosh, a mortal, to be frail, weak, subject to death.] with her; and he ate.

Syndein                                  {The Fall of the Woman and then the Fall of the Man}

And when the woman {Ishah} saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was object of desire to the eyes . . . and the tree being desirable - that caused one to be knowing - she took {an act of volition} of the fruit thereof, and kept on eating {sin of ignorance, but guilty anyway}. Then she gave also to her man with her . . . and he kept eating also {Adam's sin of cognizance}. {Note: In order to sin, the woman turned her back on a perfect deal. Best of soul rapport, physical stimulation, foods, only pleasure, and spiritual teaching directly from Jesus Christ. Yet now she rejects all - wanting to be as smart as God. So, her sin was a sin because it was an act of her volition . . . but it was an 'unknown sin' coming from Satan's deception (see I Timothy 2:14). No excuse. But ignorance is NO EXCUSE, it was still a sin.}. {Note: Secondly, Adam KNEW it was a sin to eat of the fruit and that Ishah had sinned. He knew, Ishah was going to have to leave the garden and Adam chose being with His right woman over being with His right God - Jesus Christ. Adam's sin was a sin of cognizance and became the 'sin of the father' that is still today passed from the father to the child in child birth. Therefore every child is born spiritual dead and condemned - except for Jesus Christ because of the virgin birth - also explaining the need for the virgin birth!}

Young’s Updated LT             And the woman sees that the tree is good for food, and that it is pleasant to the eyes, and the tree is desirable to make one wise, and she takes of its fruit and eats, and gives also to her husband with her, and he does eat.

 

The gist of this verse:          The woman looks over the tree and decides that is does look good and that it is desirable such that, it would make her wise. So she eats from the tree and then hands some to Adam, and he eats the fruit as well.


Genesis 3:6a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

râʾâh (רָאָה) [pronounced raw-AWH]

to see, to look, to look at, to view, to behold; to observe; to perceive, to understand, to learn, to know

3rd person feminine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #7200 BDB #906

ʾîshshâh (אִשָּה) [pronounced eesh-SHAW]

woman, wife

feminine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #802 BDB #61

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

ţôwb (טוֹב) [pronounced tohbv]

pleasant, pleasing, agreeable, good, better; approved

masculine singular adjective which can act like a substantive

Strong’s #2896 BDB #373

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

maʾăkâl (מַאֲכָל) [pronounced mah-uh-KAWL]

food; corn; corn meal

masculine singular noun

Strong’s #3978 BDB #38


Translation: The woman observed that the tree was good for food... The woman begins to carefully examine this tree in the light of all that the serpent said to her. She looks at the fruit, smells it, observes its coloration, and it is obvious that the fruit would taste good. My guess is, this fruit is distinctive and could not be confused with any of the fruit in the garden.


The word for good is the same one as is found in Gen. 1:10,12, 18. In fact, so is the word for saw or observed, which is found in the Qal imperfect in all three verses. What is different is that God observed that it was (Qal perfect tense) and there is no corresponding verb in v. 6. The perfect tense is a completed action and what He created was completely and totally good. The woman does not use this verb. She examines the tree and notes to herself, good for food. The word translated a delight or pleasant to the eyes is taʾăvâh (תַּאֲוָה) [pronounced tah-uh-VAW] and it means more than just pleasant. It means desirable or something which causes lust or longing for. Strong’s #8378 BDB #16. There is a similar (in meaning) verb found in the Niphal (passive voice) of châmad (חָמַד) [pronounced khaw-MAHD]. It means to be desired. Strong's #2530 BDB #326. Both words can be used in a good and a bad sense.


The woman begins to carefully consider this tree and its fruit, something that she had not really done before. Bear in mind, there might be 10,000 trees in the garden with desirable fruit on them, but now she is focused on this one tree and upon its fruit (which is not an apple, by the way).


Now the woman carefully examines the tree. I get the impression that she had never done this before. She has never moved in close to the tree before. The tree was off-limits, whether God told her this or Adam, as her immediate superior. She added to what was told her (or Adam added to what was told him). “Don’t eat of the tree—don’t even touch the tree—or you will die.” It is possible that she and Adam avoided this tree altogether; that they did not go near to it, they did not look at it, and, most of the time, they did not think about it. Now the woman looks at the tree carefully, up close, and she thinks about it. She looks at the fruit of the tree, and it looks good to her. It is clear from looking at it that this fruit would be good for food (the exact wording of the Hebrew).


What we find here is actually called a metonym. It is one word which stands in for another word. She observes that the tree [is] good for food. Now, she is not thinking about taking off a branch and chewing on that branch, she is thinking of the fruit of the tree. Tree here is a metonym for the fruit of the tree. We find this in literature and common speech all of the time. I mention this because the Bible is filled with figures of speech.


Let me give you some examples of a metonym: when your wife is in a bad mood and you think poetically, you might say, “A pall of gloom was cast over the house.” However, the difficulties have nothing to do with your house, it has to do with the mood of your wife. When a nearby area was about to be annexed and the people did not want to be, a newspaper headline might say, The City is Up in Arms. However, the city itself cannot do anything which is organic or thoughtful; it is the citizens of the city who are up in arms (another figure of speech). The Bible is filled with common figures of speech, and they are quite easy to recognize. Most people when reading this passage would have in their minds the fruit of the tree being good for food, even though the word fruit is not found in this verse.


When we read and study the Bible, we get the gist of what is being said by reading it as any other sort of literature. We first interpret a passage, for the most part, according to the common understanding of reading the same thing in some other literary work. We read a common figure of speech as we would in any other form of literature. The Bible was written by men who use figures of speech, and they are found in their writings.


This does not mean that we take a non-literal interpretation of the Bible. We take the Bible and circumstances and words literally, unless there is a reason not to. When the Bible tells us that the woman sees that the tree is good for food, without thinking, we understand that she is looking at the fruit of the tree and thinking that the fruit of the tree is good for food.


Along the same lines, when we study the words of Jesus, there are some things which are clearly parables (in many translations, they might begin with the words a certain man...). But, likewise, there are stories which Jesus tells, and some people are given names (e.g., Lazarus in the story of Lazarus and the rich man—in Luke 16:19–31); which story is a recounting of a true experience.


When it comes to interpreting the Bible—even though I believe in a literal interpretation—the way language is normally employed, with figures of speech, must be taken into account. As a matter of fact, there is a 1000 page book by Bullinger which examines all of the figures of speech found in the Bible (and still misses many of them). The table of contents alone is 25 pages (which lists all the types of figures of speech found in the Bible).


Genesis 3:6b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

taʾăvâh (תַּאֲוָה) [pronounced tah-uh-VAW]

desire, wish, longing, lust; the thing desired, the object of lust; delight; delicate; honor; ornament

feminine singular noun

Strong’s #8378 BDB #16

hûwʾ (הוּא) [pronounced hoo]

he, it; himself as a demonstrative pronoun: that, this (one)

3rd person masculine singular, personal pronoun; sometimes the verb is, is implied

Strong’s #1931 BDB #214

This pronoun can be used in the emphatic sense. Sometimes, the verb to be is implied when this pronoun is used.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

ʿêynayim (עֵינַיִם) [pronounced ģay-nah-YIM]

eyes, two eyes, literal eye(s), spiritual eyes; face, appearance, form; surface

feminine dual noun with the definite article

Strong’s #5869 (and #5871) BDB #744


Translation: ...and that this [tree] was a delight to the eyes... Then she perhaps steps back and looks at the tree, and it is delightful to look at. The noun here can mean a delight but also an object of desire. It is not clear whether it is the fruit that is an object of her desire, or the tree that she finds delightful. In any case, she is deciding that she definitely wants this fruit. And the tree itself appeals to her. It just looks really good. The tree seemed to beckon her.


The woman examines the tree and decides that this fruit is something which is desirable to the eyes. Although we would expect an adjective here or the participle of a verb, we get a noun instead, which means desire, wish, longings of one’s heart; lust, appetite, covetousness (bad sense); thing desired, object of desire. The tree does not just look pleasant; the woman desires this tree. Again, we are not really speaking of the tree, but the fruit of the tree as well as that which eating the fruit purports to give her.


Genesis 3:6c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

châmad (חָמַד) [pronounced khaw-MAHD

desired, desirous; coveted; pleasant, agreeable; precious

Niphal participle

Strong's #2530 BDB #326

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

sâkal (שָכַל) [pronounced saw-KAHL]

to look at, to attend to, to turn the mind to; to be or become understanding, to be prudent; to be successful, to act prosperously; to instruct, to teach, to make prudent

Hiphil infinitive construct

Strong’s #7919 BDB #968

All of the Hiphil meanings, according to BDB, are: to look at or upon, have insight; to give attention to, consider, ponder, be prudent; to have insight, have comprehension; insight, comprehension (substantive); to cause to consider, give insight, teach; the teachers, the wise; to act circumspectly, act prudently, act wisely; to prosper, have success; to cause to prosper. Gesenius has: to look at; to attend to, to turn the mind to; to be [become] understanding or prudent; to be successful; to act prosperously; to make prudent, to teach; to give succcess. As a substantive: intelligence, prudence.


Translation: ...and the tree was desirable to look at [possibly, desirable to instruct]. She had possibly not noticed this before, but she was mesmerized by this tree. She enjoyed looking at it. It was pleasant to her; she, in fact, desired to look at it.


You see, before, she knew that she could not eat of the fruit of the tree; and she even knew not to touch it; so she probably just avoided this tree altogether. She knew where it was and there was a lot to enjoy in the Garden of Eden, so she probably just kept from even being around this tree. She probably never gave it a good looking over before. Whereas, before, she probably did not go near this tree; she probably did not consider it; and now she is enjoying just looking at the tree.


It is like many sins—they look good to us. We like looking them over and being seduced by them.


The verb here is sâkal (שָכַל) [pronounced saw-KAHL], which means, to look at, to attend to, to turn the mind to; to be or become understanding, to be prudent; to be successful, to act prosperously; to instruct, to teach, to make prudent. Strong’s #7919 BDB #968. So, this could be translated: The woman observed that the tree was good for food and that this [tree] was a delight to the eyes and the tree was desirable to instruct. Many have translated this, desirable to make one wise.


Gen 3:6a The woman saw that the tree [had fruit that] was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise.


The third thing which the woman observes is, the tree was desirable to make one wise. Literally, it reads: ...and desirable the tree to be wise [insightful, prudent]. It is not the tree which is desirable to make one wise, but the act of eating the fruit of the tree which is desirable to make one wise; again, a metonym.


Let me reveal a secret here: do you know what sorts of people are gullible? Honest people. An honest person means what they say and they tell you is what they believe to be true; and, for this reason, they tend to believe what you say as well. Unless there is good reason not to, an honest person will believe most of what you tell them, until they find it not to be true (or they understand that you have a faulty character). The woman is now thinking about eating from this tree; she has been told that she will not die and that she will be given great insights into life if she eats from the tree. She is believing Satan at this point.


There is a simple pecking order in this world, and God always sets up authorities. The Second Person of the Trinity is the ultimate authority over those on earth. Below Him is Adam. Below Adam is the woman. Below the woman are the animals and all that is on the earth. The serpent, who should be under the woman’s authority, tells her that she ought to eat from the fruit of this tree because this would make her as wise as God, which would change up the pecking order. If she is wise as God, she is then in authority over Adam. However, she is considering advice from someone under her who is telling her to do something that her authorities (God and Adam) have told her not to do. There is only one prohibition which the woman has heard, and that has to do with eating from the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. And now her mind is racing, thinking about actually doing this, not considering the prohibitions of the authorities over her, but considering the words of this serpent, who is under her authority.


As a general rule of thumb, if someone under your authority suggests that you disobey someone in authority over you, it is probably a bad idea.


So this is where we will leave the woman, having just had a conversation with Satan, and contemplating eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.


Gen. 3:6 The woman observed that the tree was good for food and that this [tree] was a delight to the eyes and the tree was desirable to look at [possibly, desirable to instruct]. Therefore, she took from its fruit and she ate [it]; then she also [or, she indeed] gave [some] to her husband with [possibly, near, by, against, beside] her and he also ate [it].


The woman, after careful study of the tree and the fruit, takes the fruit and eats. She suddenly realizes that she has done something wrong. She suddenly has a conscience and recognizes that there is good and evil in this world. This acted upon her as sin acts upon us. Our fellowship with God is immediately broken when we sin. Her fellowship with God was broken immediately at the eating of this fruit. She has several options before her, but her option of choice is to find the man and put him into the same boat as she is. She has been deceived, although God made it clear as to what was acceptable and what was not. She broke the only negative commandment of God and is in a state of confusion.


Satan, upon seeing man in the Garden of Eden, with the woman, in perfect environment and in a state of bliss, chose to do whatever he could to cause man to fall; to be in the same position that he is in. The woman will react to her own fall the same way. Rather than go to Adam and discuss this, she brings the fruit to him. This may have been the first ultimatum given by a woman to a man and it may have been an unspoken ultimatum. God does not reveal this to us. However, there is no confusion with Adam. He has not been deceived. He knows exactly what the issue is. Any man who has ever been head over heels in love understands what Adam does in this verse. There is a clear-cut choice for him. He has seen animal after animal when he named them and recognized that there was no one in the animal kingdom for him. It was when God brought the woman to him that he realized and recognized his lifetime counterpart. There are no singles bars; there are no other options that he is aware of; there is one woman for Adam; woman that he is in love with and desires beyond anything else in the world, and she stands before him holding the fruit that Yahweh God has specifically told him not to eat. He knows that the woman has partaken of the fruit. Even if the woman did not say a thing to Adam, the very fact of her holding the fruit before him has told him that she has eaten from the tree. Now he has to decide between his creator and what God created for him. He has to decide between the love of his life and Jesus Christ in the garden. He does not fully understand the outcome of what he is about to do, but he does recognize that he has a choice that is clear-cut: Jesus Christ or the woman. Adam chose; as federal head of the human race, he chose for all of us at that time. Just as when a president declares war on a country and congress approves, we are at war with that country because they act as our federal heads. Adam was so much in love with the woman and was so worried that he might lose her, that he chose her above everything else.


We all have free will and we all make choices; some which have devastating effect on our lives for decades. Those who at a young age became involved with drugs or illicit sex have caused themselves problems with far-reaching results. With drugs, there are portions of our brains which might not ever function up to par ever again. With pre-marital sex, we might lose out on the right person designed by God for us. We might be out fornicating with some inconsequential person while our right person persistently is knocking on our door. After awhile, that person gives up and we are left with emptiness and swinging at the wind. Adam had no concept as to the long-term effect of his sin. He did know his Creator, however, and God told Adam emphatically not to eat of the tree. There are certain mistakes that we make with our lives; even fundamental mistakes that we make after salvation; after our teen years. There have been wonderful marriages and families destroyed by adultery. One of the purposes of filling our souls with doctrine is that not only do we know what the prohibitions are but we know why and the rationale behind these prohibitions. We have a better grasp on the longevity of our mistakes and might chose for once not to make stupid mistakes because we have a well-rounded view of what the sin is and the results of that sin. Certainly, the more we know about God's Word, the more prohibitions that we learn; but we also learn why these are prohibitions. It is much easier to listen when someone tells you that something is hot and that you will burn yourself than it is to find that out first-hand.


With a human conscience and being out of fellowship with God, Adam and the woman begin acting in accordance with their new found conscience. I hate to make this analogy because it is not an exact analogy, but dogs do not realize that they are naked and this never bothers them whether they are in a crowd or alone. Adam and the woman were naked and it did not bother them to be that way before the animal kingdom, before Jesus Christ, before each other; and, if they were aware of the angelic kingdom, before the angels. Clothes were not an issue to them. This is not an argument for nudism. That is not the point. Nudists recognize that they are naked. Even a nudist would be embarrassed to be au natural in certain places and under certain circumstances. However, this had never been an issue to Adam and the woman until now.


Recapping this chapter:


Gen 3:1 The snake was more devious and subtle than all the animals of the field the LORD God had made. He asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must never eat the fruit of any tree in the garden'?"


Satan begins his attack on the Word of God by asking a simple question: “You both cannot eat fruit from every tree in the garden?” The implication is, God is being unfair; here are all of these trees right in front of them, and God prohibits them from eating fruit from every tree. What is God hiding? What is God keeping from you?


Gen 3:2–3 The woman answered the snake, "We're allowed to eat the fruit from any tree in the garden except the tree in the middle of the garden. God said, 'You must never eat it or touch it. If you do, you will die!'"


In the woman’s answer, she both adds to the Word of God and she takes from the Word of God. God did not prohibit her from touching this tree (she added to the Word of God); and God warned the woman that “in dying, you will die” (she took from the Word of God).


Gen 3:4–5: "Emphatically, you will not die!" the snake told the woman. God knows that when you [both] eat it your eyes [the eyes of Adam and Eve] will be opened. You will [both] be like God, knowing good and evil."


Satan not only implants the idea of the woman eating from this tree, but the idea that Adam will eat from the tree as well. Even though he is talking to the woman alone, the serpent makes it clear that eating from this tree will be done by both Adam and the woman.


Now the woman does something which she had not done up until this time—she carefully examines the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. She examines it carefully and she thinks about it.


Gen 3:6a The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it.


Satan deceived the woman. He convinced her that she would not die and he references the name of the tree, saying that she would be just like God, knowing good and evil. The woman believes that she will achieve some sort of equality with God, knowing good and evil as He does. Therefore, the woman, being deceived, eats the fruit.


Genesis 3:6d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

lâqach (לָקַח) [pronounced law-KAHKH]

to take, to take away, to take in marriage; to seize

3rd person feminine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #3947 BDB #542

min (מִן) [pronounced min]

from, off, out from, out of, away from, on account of, since, than, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

perîy (פְּרִי) [pronounced peree]

fruit, produce (of the ground); fruit, offspring, children, progeny (of the womb); fruit (of one’s actions, labor)

masculine singular noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #6529 BDB #826


Translation: Therefore, she took from its fruit... Then we have a series of actions, all of which are a result of the volition of the woman (and then the man). The wâw consecutives followed by imperfect verbs indicate that these things happen in this particular order. The first thing that she does is she takes a piece of fruit into her hands and plucks it from the tree.


Genesis 3:6e

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

3rd person feminine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #398 BDB #37


Translation: ...and she ate [it];... She then eats the fruit; and there is nothing said about its texture or flavor. Nothing is said about how much she ate. Did she eat an entire piece of fruit or a portion? We have no idea.


The woman is now a sinner; she has sinned; she has acted against the mandate of God. So, she acquires a sin nature, which will affect her next act.


As I have said on many occasions, a person does not sin alone; they do not just sin, keep it to themselves, and it has no other affect on their lives. Often, when a person sins, they want to share this. This may not even be devious. It may be, “I really liked doing this; do you want to try?”


However, in this case, we can be reasonably certain that the woman wants to put the man in the same boat. She knows that she has sinned; she knows that she has done wrong. Whatever the result is, she wants the man to be with her, even if it means his destruction as well.


Gen 3:6a–e The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it.


Satan deceived the woman. He convinced her that she would not die and he references the name of the tree, saying that she would be just like God, knowing good and evil. The woman believes that she will achieve some sort of equality with God, knowing good and evil as He does. Therefore, the woman, being deceived, eats the fruit.


Genesis 3:6f

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

nâthan (נָתַן) [pronounced naw-THAHN]

to give, to grant, to place, to put, to set; to make

3rd person feminine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #5414 BDB #678

gam (גַם) [pronounced gahm]

also, furthermore, in addition to, even, moreover

adverb

Strong’s #1571 BDB #168

Gam has five primary usages. ➊ It is used to denote in addition to or a continuation of or an adding to a previous thought or point. It is often rendered also. ➋ Gam can be used as an intensifier (even) and is sometimes used this way with a negative. ➌ Gam can be used to make a sentence emphatic (yea, indeed, truly) or it can simply be used to give considerable emphasis to the next word. ➍ It can be rendered even if when followed by an imperfect verb. ➎ Finally, it can be rendered as an adverb—however, but—but usually followed by a negative particle.

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

ʾîysh (אִיש) [pronounced eesh]

a man, a husband; anyone; a certain one; each, each one, everyone

masculine singular noun (sometimes found where we would use a plural); with the 3rd person feminine singular suffix

Strong's #376 BDB #35

ʿîm (עִם) [pronounced ģeem]

with, at, by, near; like; from; against; toward; as long as; beside, except; in spite of

preposition of nearness and vicinity with the 3rd person feminine singular suffix

Strong’s #5973 BDB #767


Translation: ...then she also [or, she indeed] gave [some] to her husband with [possibly, near, by, against, beside] her... The adverb gam here indicates that the woman must get the husband involved.


Then we have an interesting preposition ʿîm (עִם) [pronounced ģeem]. This is not an unusual adverb, but why is it here? Obviously, if she gives this fruit to her husband, he must be with her. This preposition can also mean against, beside. It is possible that more occurred here than, Adam came home from work and the woman then handed him the fruit.


Women are often very good at manipulation, and some have us men figured out. So, to get what they want, they sometimes know how to get us to provide it for them. We do not really know all that happened here, how quickly this occurred; but, I would not be shocked if there was some womanly manipulation involved.


Did she have this fruit in the bushes behind her, and she takes this fruit and takes a bite of it and then hands it to the man? Again, this is all speculation, but this woman, who is a genius, has a sin nature; and she wants her man to be with her in this situation of sinning against Yehowah God.


Genesis 3:6g

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâkal (אָכַל) [pronounced aw-KAHL]

to eat; to devour, to consume, to destroy

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #398 BDB #37


Translation: ...and he ate [it]. The man is also a genius. He probably understands the situation almost entirely. He looks at the woman, the fruit—he is certain that she ate from the fruit—there is no question about this. At this point, the man has to choose between the woman and God, and he chooses the woman. He eats the fruit, knowing that he is disobeying God’s one command.

 

From the NET Bible: This pericope (3:1-7) is a fine example of Hebrew narrative structure. After an introductory disjunctive clause that introduces a new character and sets the stage (3:1), the narrative tension develops through dialogue, culminating in the action of the story. Once the dialogue is over, the action is told in a rapid sequence of verbs - she took, she ate, she gave, and he ate.

genesis03.gif

Gen 3:6b She also gave some [of the fruit] to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.


Eve and the Apple (a photograph); from Restoring Israel; accessed October 18, 2015.


When the woman gives some of the fruit to her husband, Adam sins knowingly. He understood that he was making a choice between Jesus in the garden (the revealed member of the Trinity) or the woman whom he loved. He chose the woman over God. This was not a matter of being deceived; this was a matter of Adam making a clear choice: he chose what God had given him over God. He was choosing to disobey God. Paul wrote, Adam was not deceived. It was the woman who was deceived and sinned (1Tim. 2:14).


With this act, man essentially hands rulership of the world over to Satan. The woman thought that this would affect her standing in the world, making her equal with God (and therefore being above Adam, at least for a short time). Authority did change, but not in the way she expected it to.

The Shifting Authority

1.      God originally gave man authority over the earth and the animals of the earth. Gen. 1:28: And God blessed them. And God said to them, "Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth." Man was to subdue the earth (do whatever he chose to make the earth to his liking); and man had authority over all that was on the earth.

2.      When the woman was made, she was second in command to Adam. She was made as a helper to Adam.

3.      This gives us a simple hierarchy: God|man|woman|the animals and the earth.

4.      However, as we have already studied, the woman submitted ot the authority of a creature (the serpent) and then the man submitted to the authority of the woman, both of them disobeying God, Who is their authority (Gen. 3:1–6). The woman submitted to the authority of the serpent, disobeying God; and the man then submitted to the authority of the woman, disobeying God.

5.      The end result is, Satan rules over this earth.

         1)      Jesus says, in John 12:31: Now is the judgment of this world; now will the ruler of this world be cast out [or, driven out, sent away].

         2)      In John 16:8–11, Jesus speaks of sending the Holy Spirit to us: And when He [God the Holy Spirit] comes, He will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment: concerning sin, because they do not believe in Me; concerning righteousness, because I go to the Father, and you will see Me no longer; concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world has been judged [in the past with results which continue into the future].

         3)      Paul writes the Corinthians, saying: And even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled only to those who are perishing. In their case, the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, Who is the image of God (2Cor. 4:3–4).

6.      This is the reason that we are told on several occasions that we are in the world, but not of the world (John 15:19 16:33 17:11–16 1John 2:16 4:4). We as believers are not to submit ourselves to the thinking (and therefore authority) of Satan, who rules over this world.

7.      This will change. After the Tribulation, Satan will be put into chains for most of the Millennium. This will be a period of perfect environment during which weapons will be beaten into plowshares because there will be no more war; and the lion will lie down with the lamb (Isa. 2:3–4 11:6–16 65:25 Micah 4:1–7). During this time period, Jesus Christ will reign over the earth from Jerusalem.

8.      Satan will be allowed access to the earth once more at the end of the Millennium, at which time he will actually turn the minds and hearts of some against God, even after they have lived in perfect environment under a perfect ruler. Satan will lead a rebellion against Jesus Christ after 1000 years of perfect environment. In the end, Satan and his angels will be thrown into the lake of fire. Rev. 20:1–3, 7–10. This will end Satan’s hold over the earth and over man. This should give you an idea as to just how smart Satan is. He will be able to organize a revolution against God with people who are living in perfect environment.

The theological consistency of the Bible is a marvel to behold. How a book on such controversial topics as sin, salvation, God and the Messiah to come could hold together so well, despite the fact that the Bible was written over a period of at least 2000 years by about 40 different authors is an amazing thing to behold.


Gen 3:6 The woman saw that the tree [had fruit that] was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.


There is a difference between the sins of Adam and the woman, as 1Tim. 2:14 points out (Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression). This difference results in a divergence of the roles of man and woman in human history. The woman sinned because she disobeyed God; however, she was deceived. The man sinned knowingly—he was not deceived or confused. There was no question in his mind about what he was doing. Although their sins were different, the man and the woman were both completely and totally culpable. The difference of their sins will result in a difference of judgment and penalty; however, both the man and the woman sinned, and as God promised both of them, in dying, they will die.


One of the chief differences which we will study is, the sin nature will be genetically passed down by the male and not by the female. Affixed to this sin nature is Adam’s original sin (we are on the hook, as human beings, as sons of Adam for his sin—that is another topic, but, it is actually a good thing that we all have Adam’s original sin imputed ot us at birth). The reason for the virgin birth of Jesus Christ is more than simply being a sign (Isa. 7:14); the virgin birth of Jesus Christ is important because, our Lord cannot be born with a sin nature. He cannot be born with Adam’s original sin imputed to Him. The only way for anyone to be born without a sin nature is to be born apart from the contribution of the man. The virgin birth bypasses the contribution from the male. Again, it is the sin nature and Adam’s original sin which are passed down through the male because Adam sinned intentionally and knowingly. Jesus Christ must be born of a woman (Gal. 4:4), bypassing Adam altogether, in order to be free of these two things.


Much of human history is wrapped up in Rev. 12:4: And the tail of the dragon [Satan] drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth: and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born. Satan brought down a 3rd of the angels with him when he sinned, and then he determined to destroy the Child born of a woman the moment He was born.

 

Arthur Pink: The state of the natural man is far worse than he imagines. It is not only that man is a sinner, a sinner both by nature and by practice, but that he is "alienated from the life of God" (Eph. 4:18). In a word the sinner is dead- dead in trespasses and sins. As the father said of the prodigal, "This my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found" (Luke 15:24). That the natural man is dead in trespasses and sins is no mere figure of speech; it is a solemn reality, an awful fact. It is ignorance and the denial of this fact which lies at the root of so much of the false teaching of our day. What the natural man needs first and foremost is not education or reformation, but life. It is because the sinner is dead that he needs to be born again. But how little this is pressed today! The unspeakably dreadful state of the natural man is glossed over where it is not directly repudiated. For the most part our preachers seem afraid to insist upon the utter ruin and total depravity of human nature. This is a fatal defect in any preaching: sinners will never be brought to see their need of a Savior until they realize their lost condition, and they will never discover their lost condition until they learn that they are dead in sin.


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Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Fall: Initial Results of the Man and Woman's Sin


And so open [two] eyes of two of them and so they know that naked they [are] and so they sew together leaf of a fig [tree] and so they make for themselves loin-coverings.

Genesis

3:7

Consequently, the eyes of them both were opened and they knew that they [were] naked. Therefore, they stitched together the leaves of a fig tree and made loin-coverings for themselves.

Consequently, the eyes of them both were opened and they knew that they were naked. Therefore, they stitched together fig leaves and made loin-covers for themselves.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And the eyes of both were enlightened, and they knew that they were naked, divested of the purple robe in which they had been created. And they saw the sight of their shame, and sewed to themselves the leaves of figs, and made to them cinctures. [JERUSALEM. And they made to them vestments.]

Latin Vulgate                          And the eyes of them both were opened: and when they perceived themselves to be naked, they sewed together fig leaves, and made themselves aprons.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so open [two] eyes of two of them and so they know that naked they [are] and so they sew together leaf of a fig [tree] and so they make for themselves loin-coverings.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    Then the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons.

Septuagint (Greek)                And the eyes of both of them were opened, and they perceived that they were naked, and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves coverings to go around them.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           Then they both saw clearly and knew that they were naked. So they sewed fig leaves together and made garments for themselves.

Contemporary English V.       Right away they saw what they had done, and they realized they were naked. Then they sewed fig leaves together to make something to cover themselves.

Easy English                          Then their eyes opened. They realised that they were naked. They sewed together leaves from a fig tree to cover themselves. (Figs are sweet fruit with many seeds.).

Easy-to-Read Version            Then {both the man and the woman changed. It was like} their eyes opened, {and they saw things differently}. They saw that they had no clothes on—they were naked. So they got some fig leaves and sewed them together and wore the fig leaves for clothes.

Good News Bible (TEV)         As soon as they had eaten it, they were given understanding and realized that they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and covered themselves.

The Message                         Immediately the two of them did "see what's really going on"--saw themselves naked! They sewed fig leaves together as makeshift clothes for themselves.

New Century Version             Then, it was as if their eyes were opened. They realized they were naked, so they sewed fig leaves together and made something to cover themselves.

New Life Bible                        Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they knew they were without clothes. So they sewed fig leaves together and made them-selves clothing.

New Living Translation           At that moment their eyes were opened, and they suddenly felt shame at their nakedness. So they sewed fig leaves together to cover themselves.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And thereafter, the eyes of both of them were opened wide and they realized that they were naked. So they sewed fig leaves together and made skirts to go around themselves.

Ancient Roots Translinear      ...the eyes of the two unsealed, and they knew their bareness. They sewed fig foliage and made belts for themselves.

Christian Community Bible     Then their eyes were opened and both of them knew they were naked. So they sewed leaves of a fig tree together and made themselves loincloths.

Today’s NIV                          Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And their eyes were open and they were conscious that they had no clothing and they made themselves coats of leaves stitched together.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they became aware that they were naked. They accordingly joined fig leaves together, and made aprons for themselves.

New Advent Bible                  And the eyes of them both were opened: and when they perceived themselves to be naked, they sewed together fig leaves, and made themselves aprons.


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

The Amplified Bible                Then the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves apronlike girdles.

Concordant Literal Version    And unclosing are their eyes, they two, and knowing are they that they are naked. And sewing are they fig leaves and making for themselves girdle skirts.

Emphasized Bible                  Then were opened the eyes of them both, and they knew that, naked, they were,—so they tacked together fig-leaves, and made for themselves girdles,...

English Standard Version      Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked. And they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves loincloths.

Heritage Bible                        And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew by seeing [they knew by seeing that they were naked. Yada, to know by seeing. The Heritage Bible translates yada as know by seeing, except where know is used of a man to know a woman and conceive seed. In most instances it is identical to ouruse of the word see to mean that we understand something because we now have experienced it. It emphasizes the fact that we see with our spiritual and soulical eyes, with the eyes of our understanding, after experiencing it. When you see with your soul without Holy Spirit given revelation knowledge, your seeing is incorrect. Your soulical seeing has used words of men instead of words of God. When you properly use words of God, then your soulical eyes receive revelation knowledge from the Holy Spirit through your spirit, and you see correctly. When Adam and Eve saw that they were naked, it was a revelation knowledge seeing. After they saw they were naked, they could easily see their need for God’s clothing.] that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves girdles [they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves girdles. Adam and Eve tried to cover their sin with their own works. This shows where all man made religions originate. They are man’s attempt to cover his sins and guilty conscience by his own works, instead of coming to God through Jesus, the only covering for sin. Also, I never cease to be amazed at the accuracy of the Word of God. All these years we have followed the King James rendering of chagowr as apron. The meaning of the word is not apron, which would only cover the front and not the rear. The word is girdle that wraps around the entire loins, and the word was later used as the girdle in which to carry weapons of war, 1 Sam 18:4; 2 Sam 20:8; 1 Kng 2:5; 2 Kng 3:21 as well as decorative dress and bracing of the loins, 2 Sam 18:11; Isa 3:24. So Adam and Eve made a girdle out of fig leaves. God immediately replaced it with the skin of a sacrificed animal.]. From this experience of Adam and Eve forward, every human conscience has been goaded by guilt and fear.

LTHB                                     And the eyes of both of them were opened, and they knew that they were naked. And they sewed leaves of the fig tree, and made girdles for themselves.

NASB                                     Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves loin coverings [Or girdles].

Syndein                                  {Spiritual Death and First Human Case of Evil/Legalism}

And the 'eyes' of them both were opened {eyes of the soul}, and they knew that they were naked {plural - both knew both were naked} and they sewed fig leaves together, and manufactured {'asah} for themselves 'loin coverings'/aprons. {Note: They are now aware of the knowledge of good and evil. Cognizance of sin distorted them into going into legalism. The first act of legalism was to try and get right again WITH EACH OTHER - forget GOD! Today this translates into 'forget God, love each other, and all will be right in the world' and that is just another of Satan's deceptions. God must always come FIRST!}.

Third Millennium Bible            And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves things to gird about.

Young's Updated LT              And the eyes of them both are opened, and they know that they are naked, and they sew fig-leaves, and make to themselves girdles.

 

The gist of this verse:          The man and the woman realize that they are naked, so that they make themselves a covering for their sexual organs from the leaves of a tree (here, it says fig tree).


As is often found in the Hebrew, a series of actions are tied together chronologically (or logically) with imperfect verbs and wâw consecutives. However, since that would seem monotonous in the English, we change things up a bit with changing up the conjunctions. It is the same conjunction in the Hebrew throughout, but this is not how we do things in the English.


Genesis 3:7a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

pâqach (פָּקַח) [pronounced paw-KAHKH]

to be opened; receiving opening

3rd person feminine plural, Niphal imperfect

Strong’s #6491 BDB #824

ʿêynayim (עֵינַיִם) [pronounced ģay-nah-YIM]

eyes, two eyes, literal eye(s), spiritual eyes; face, appearance, form; surface

feminine dual construct

Strong’s #5869 (and #5871) BDB #744

shenêy (שְנֵי) [pronounced shen-Ā]

two, two of, a pair of, a duo of

dual numeral noun with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

Strong’s #8147 BDB #1040


Translation: Consequently, the eyes of them both were opened... This is a common phrase, often found in the New Testament when an unbeliever is given the gospel, and they suddenly understand who Jesus Christ is and what He has done. This is understood to be very literal, when Saul was temporarily blinded in Acts 9:18a And instantly scales as it were fell from his eyes, and he instantly saw again. Jesus, explaining why He used parables, and how the eyes of many Jews could no longer see the truth, said: “For the heart of this people has become dull; they are hard of hearing, and they have shut their eyes, so that they would not see with their eyes and hear with their ears and understand with their hearts and turn, and I would heal them.” (Matt. 13:15, quoting Isa. 6:10).


What is happening here is quite the opposite. Adam and the woman were not physically blind up until this point, quite obviously, because the woman looked at the tree and came to some conclusions based upon the way that it looked. Therefore, this is figurative language, indicating that they now see the world in a whole new way. They may have thoughts and feelings that they did not have before; they may view those thoughts and feelings in a different way.


Neither the man nor the woman give any thought to God.


Genesis 3:7b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

yâdaʿ (יָדַע) [pronounced yaw-DAHĢ]

to know, to perceive, to acquire knowledge, to become acquainted with, to know by experience, to have a knowledge of something; to see; to learn; to recognize [admit, acknowledge, confess]

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #3045 BDB #393

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

ʿêrôm (עֵרֹם) [pronounced ģay-ROAM]

naked; exposed

masculine plural adjective

Strong’s #5903 BDB #735

This is also spelled with a yodh: ʿêyrôm (עֵירֹם) [pronounced gay-ROAM] (the yodh is found here).

hêm (הֵם) [pronounced haym]

they, those; themselves; these

3rd person masculine plural personal pronoun

Strong’s #1992 BDB #241

As with many pronouns, the verb to be is often implied.


Translation: ...and they knew that they [were] naked. The man and the woman had always been naked and they had always seen this. Being naked was their natural state; but, suddenly, they view their nakedness in a different light. Most of us have had the dream of being naked in a classroom (so I have been told); and being suddenly embarrassed about that turn of events. Some of us have committed acts before others that bring us great shame and embarrassment. The man and the woman now view their state of nakedness as a problem; a problem which they must solve.


This is how man thinks apart from divine revelation; man thinks that if he can solve his problems with his fellow man that everything will be alright as a result. What Adam and the woman do will not solve their problem, which is, they have sinned against God, their human spirit is now shut down (man relates to God via the human spirit); and they both have a sin nature at this point.


In Gen. 3:7, we come to the immediate affects of sin on the man and the woman:


Gen 3:7a Then their eyes were opened, and they both kept on knowing that they were naked.


Even though I take the Bible literally, there are times when we understand that we should not take the Bible literally, such as with the first part of v. 7. Adam and the woman were not blind, and we know this because concerning the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, we just read: the woman observed that it was a delight to the eyes [or, it was pleasant to look at]. (Gen. 3:6). So, obviously, the woman could see. She was not blind. However, the eyes of her soul were opened, and she saw things differently now. She had knowledge of good and evil.


Parents, with every child, enjoy a time of innocence with their child. There is a time period, sometimes for many years, where the parent can shield his or her child from the gross evil of the world. The child knows the love of his parents, of playing, of imagination, of the excitement of each new day. We enjoy the innocence of the child, and, in many ways, share this innocence with the child.


In sin, our eyes are closed in a different way. For many years, we do not understand the gospel of Jesus Christ (no one is born a Christian). Many in Israel, when Jesus came to them, did not know He was the Messiah. Jesus once explained of the Jews who rejected Him, “Because of this, I speak to them in parables, because seeing they do not see, and hearing they do not hear, nor do they understand. And the prophecy of Isaiah is fulfilled on them, which says, In hearing you will hear and in no way understand, and seeing you will see yet in no way perceive. For the heart of this people has grown fat [lazy], and they heard heavily with the ears, and they have closed their eyes, that they not see with the eyes, or hear with the ears, and understand with the heart, and be converted, and I heal them. (Matt. 13:13 Isa. 6:9–10).


In any case, my original point is, eating from this fruit did not change Adam and the woman from being blind to being able to see; they now were able to perceive the gross evil in the world, which was outside of their perception before. In fact, they were able to perceive good and evil from this point on.


Gen 3:7a Then their eyes were opened, and they both kept on knowing that they were naked.


Under the original perfect environment, the man and the woman were both naked and comfortable with that. Being naked when one lacks a sin nature is not an issue. They are now making judgments about what is proper and what is not; about what is moral and what is not. Now that they had some understanding of evil and human good, they realize that they are naked, and this concerns them both.


Again, let’s go back to the illustration of the parent and the child. During bathing and potty training, nakedness is not an issue between a child and the parent. However, gradually, a child is trained to be covered at all times and that it is normal for his parents to be covered. For Adam and the woman, this is sudden, and it concerns them both immediately. Their solution will be the first act of human good in man’s history.


Genesis 3:7c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

tâphar (תָּפַר) [pronounced taw-FAHR]

to sew [together]

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #8609 BDB #1074

ʿâleh (עָלֶה) [pronounced ģaw-LEH]

leaf, leafage

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #5929 BDB #750

As is often found in the Hebrew, often a singular noun can be used for the plural. So this may refer to several leaves.

teʾênâh (תְּאֵנָה) [pronounced teh-ay-NAW]

fig, fig tree

feminine singular noun

Strong’s #8384 BDB #1061


Translation: Therefore, they stitched together the leaves of a fig tree... We have no idea as to what sorts of tools Adam and the woman developed; nor do we have any idea what sorts of tools God simply gave them. Did they see any need to make any sort of housing for themselves? The first tool that we are aware of is the sacrificial knife which they used to kill animal sacrifices with (and the existence of this knife is revealed in the New Testament).


So, we do not know exactly how this was accomplished.


Genesis 3:7d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʿâsâh (עָשָֹה) [pronounced ģaw-SAWH]

to do, to make, to construct, to fashion, to form, to prepare, to manufacture

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #6213 BDB #793

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix

No Strong’s # BDB #510

chăgôwrâh (חֲגוֹרָה) [pronounced khuh-goh-RAW]

a binding; girdle, belt; loin covering, loin cloth; armor

feminine plural noun

Strong’s #2290 BDB #292

It is not clear from Gesenius or BDB how the masculine and feminine nouns differ in meaning.


Translation: ...and made loin-coverings for themselves. The first problem, as the man and the woman understood things to be, was that they were naked, and that was no longer acceptable. They had a natural sense of shame here, which had not been taught to them (insofar as we know). There seems to be a timeline here that might have been fairly tight. Satan tempts the woman, and the woman considers the fruit of the Tree of Knowing Good and Evil. At some point, she eats of this tree, whether that very same day, or later, as a result of thinking a great deal about the tree. However, at that point, things seem to have time limitations. The woman is probably not going to wait for weeks or months to tempt Adam. She might develop a way to entice him with the fruit, but this temptation would be the very same day that she ate the fruit herself.


Then, with their eyes being opened, the man and the woman would have put together loin coverings that very day; probably right after realizing that they were naked and suddenly having this sense of shame.


We find here the first act of human good. Whether they covered themselves up or continued to go without clothes; that is a non-issue. The issue here was that they ate of the fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. They do not think about Jesus Christ; they have forgotten about Him almost entirely. Their fellowship with God is broken and it will require God to restore this fellowship. God will have to seek them out. God will have to clothe them. He will need to cover their naked sinfulness. However, their sinfulness cannot be covered with a loin cloth made out of any material other than animal skins; and the animal must be an animal without spot and without blemish, an animal guilty of no wrongdoing; an animal which speaks of Jesus Christ who would go to the cross and die on behalf of this sin.


Gen. 3:7 Consequently, the eyes of them both were opened and they knew that they [were] naked. Therefore, they stitched together the leaves of a fig tree and made loin-coverings for themselves.


It appears that God will come to them that very same day.


Now let’s pull a lot of this together:


The woman in the garden was approached by the snake, a creature under her authority, and the snake initiated a conversation with her (the snake having been indwelt by Satan). He deceived the woman and made her think that she could instantly increase her knowledge by eating the fruit of the tree which God had forbidden her to eat. She says why she cannot eat from the tree or even touch it (you will die), and the snake tells her:


Gen 3:4–5: "Emphatically, you will not die!" the snake told the woman. God knows that when you [both] eat it your eyes [the eyes of Adam and Eve] will be opened. You will [both] be like God, knowing good and evil."


Satan wants the woman to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil; but, more importantly, he wants her to offer this fruit to Adam.


There are two underlying aspects to Genesis, both of which are in play here. Genesis is a very subtle book. It does not beat you over the head with this or that truth. Secondly, the seeds of every doctrine of the Bible, pretty much, are found in Genesis.


Here, we have the seeds of several doctrines: the abominable sins of Satan, the character of Satan and the truth of God.


In Prov. 6:16–19, God lists the most abominable sins: There are six things that the LORD hates, even seven that are disgusting to him: (1) arrogance, (2) a lying tongue, (3) hands that shed innocent blood, (4) a mind that devising wicked plans, (5) feet that are eager to run to evil, (6) a lying witness who gives false testimony, and (7) a person who spreads conflict among friends [literally, brothers]. Remember Satan’s first sin? Arrogance. “I will be like the Most High.” A lying tongue; giving false testimony: Satan tells the woman “Emphatically, you will not die!” Feet that are eager to run to evil: Satan could not leave well enough alone. The universe is larger than we can imagine; the extent of the universe is beyond man’s ability to understand. Yet, in this tiny corner of the universe, Adam and the woman are enjoying the garden, and Satan quickly runs here to do evil. He cannot let them alone. A mind that devises wicked plans: Satan has determined that He will impugn the character of God, and He begins by engineering the fall of Adam and the woman.


Secondly, we see the character of Satan in this passage. Notice one of Satan’s sins: he distorts the truth. As Jesus said, “You [referring to the religious types of His era] are of your father the devil, and your will is to do your father's desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, and has nothing to do with the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks out of his own character, for he is a liar and the father of lies.” (John 8:44).


The character of God is brought out in this. Jehovah is twice called the God of truth in Isa. 65:16. Jesus, speaking to God the Father in prayer, said, “Your Word is truth.” (John 17:17b). And Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me.”


Are you beginning to see just how much is packed into this book of Genesis (we are only in chapter 3)? Do you see how subtle it is? Furthermore, do you recognize how important the Bible is now? “Your Word is truth.” We have that one source of truth here on earth: the Bible. This is why the Bible far outsells any other book, month after month, year after year. This is why the Bible is attacked and ridiculed as no other book. This is why many nations go so far as to ban the Bible. This is why men fight to remove the Bible from the classroom and to remove any reference to it from the public square. It is God’s truth.


Back to our narrative.


Gen 3:6 The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. She also gave some [of the fruit] to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.


This is what Satan wanted. He never spoke to the man. He never deceived the man. When Adam arrived on the scene, he probably did not even notice the snake, who apparently fell silent when Adam returned to the woman. The man simply looked at the woman, whom he loved, with the forbidden fruit in her hand, and he made a decision wherein he intentionally disobeyed God. The man was not confused or deceived; the choice to him was clear: either the woman whom he loved with all of his heart outside of the garden or Jesus Christ in the garden. Adam made his choice.


Adam took the fruit from the woman’s hand and ate from it.


Gen 3:7 Then their eyes were opened, and they both kept on knowing that they were naked. Therefore, they sewed fig leaves together and made a covering [or, belt, loin-cloth, kilt] for themselves.


As discussed last time, the man and the woman were not blind; they were simply unaware of good and evil. For the first time, they can see good and evil in the world around them.


Adam and the woman have a solution: they cover themselves with fig leaves. This is the first act of human good. This is not an act of sinfulness; it is an act of good; but it is meaningless insofar as the plan of God is concerned (which is why it is called human good). All acts of good which are outside of the plan of God are designated as human good. All acts of good outside of the plan of God, although they impact human history, have no permanence in the plan of God.


A lot of believers really have no idea what human good is or what it is all about.

The Doctrine of Human Good

1.      Human good is the good that unbelievers do and the good that believers do when not filled with the Holy Spirit.

         1)      This can includes some of the great works of philanthropy. In some cases, the glorification of man is obvious. 60 Minutes often does segments on rich people who give their money away to various philanthropic causes. One such segment had one of these men putting his name to various buildings to immortalize his own philanthropy.1

         2)      Believers do the same thing. Believers who are not filled with the Spirit or do not know how to be filled with the Spirit often do good things, like giving to the church, working in a soup kitchen, seeing a touching cause on television and sending in money. These are all good things, but not eternal in the plan of God. 1Cor. 3:10–15

2.      Because human good is dead within the plan of God; it is called dead works in Heb. 6:1.

3.      All human good is repulsive to God. God does not appreciate, accept, encourage or condone human good. Isa. 64:6 (All of our righteousness acts are as filthy rags in His sight) Gen. 4:4

4.      Human good has no value in the plan of God. 2Tim. 1:9: Our Lord saved us and called us to a holy calling, not because of our works but because of His own purpose and grace, which He gave us in Christ Jesus before the ages began.

5.      Human good is not the same as legitimate morality under the Laws of Divine Establishment. Rom. 13:1–7

         1)      A society must be moral in order to survive.

         2)      A society which is immoral but filled with human good could easily self-destruct. This describes a significant portion of the culture of the United States today.

6.      No amount of good works (human good) will save man. Titus 3:5 Eph. 2:8–9

7.      at the Judgment Seat of Christ, the human good of believer will be both revealed and destroyed. 1Cor.3:10–16

8.      In the final judgement of Rev. 20:12–15 (which is not the same as the Judgment Seat of Christ), the basis of the indictment against unbelievers will be human good. Sin has been paid for on the cross, which means that God does not punish the unbeliever for his sins. Just as it would violate God’s justice to ignore sin, it would also violate His justice to judge sin twice. The only sin in play, is the sin of rejecting Jesus Christ as Savior. John 3:36 Rom. 2:6–8

9.      The production of human good will not save man. Eph. 2:8–9 Titus 3:5

10.    Human good often results in human glorification. Rom. 4:2 Eph. 2:9

11.    Human good is the good the believer produces when he is not filled with the Spirit. This can include things that believers associate with divine good, e.g., giving money to a church, visiting the sick, missionary activity, etc. If you are not filled with the Holy Spirit, then whatever you do will not have eternal impact, but it will be burned at the Judgment Seat of Christ. 1Cor. 3:11–16

12.    Human good is also the good which unbelievers produce. This may include any of the activities listed above (unbelievers do go to church) or things like, picking up a piece of trash, buying compact fluorescent bulbs for your house to save the environment, being nice to someone they do not like, etc.

13.    We believers remain on this earth, after salvation, to produce divine good, which glorifies God and is represented by gold, silver and precious stones in 1Cor. 3:12. Eph. 2:10

1 http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7363716n

See also http://www.versebyverse.org/doctrine/humangood.html which doctrine was originally taught by R. B. Thieme Jr.

http://www.gracedoctrine.org/word/Doctrines/humangood.htm

http://www.gbible.org/_files/pdf/022700.pdf


You will notice the focus of this act of human good in Gen. 3:7: the man and the woman are trying to resolve the differences between themselves, but without a thought to God. There are many atheists who think in exactly this way. One argument which I have heard on several occasions from different atheists is, if my acts of morality are no different from the moral acts of a Christian, then why do I need a Bible or a God to tell me what to do? This argument works in their minds because they think like Adam and the woman after they sinned: “We are naked; we can look at each other and tell that; therefore, we need to solve the immorality of this nakedness problem and things will be okay.” This is how the natural man thinks—resolve human conflict, resolve human problems, fix the interaction between people, and that will solve everything. However, the true conflict and the real problem is the lack of peace between man and God; not between man and man. In a world of sin, we will never fully resolve conflicts between men. We are at enmity with God. We will never achieve complete morality between people.


This is one of the reasons that we have so many human solutions out there: preserve the environment, at all costs; or restore the environment to what we believe it should be. When man’s inequity seems to be too great, take from those with too much and give to those with too little. It is impossible for society to function without government guiding and controlling its direction; we need an overall body to control and manage the affairs of man and business. It is fair to make certain that every man receives the same as his brother. Private property is wrong. Private property is good. Large corporations are, by their very nature, evil. Large corporations are the key to a nation’s success. The only sure way to peace is for all countries to disarm, and for the United States to lead the way. The only sure way to peace is to be armed to the teeth. Surely you have heard of many of these ideas and solutions, and none of them truly involve God. Now, some may make reference to God. There are churches which tout economic and social justice, for instance, and teach that Jesus did the same thing (He did not). There are environmentalists who say, “God gave us this planet, and it is our responsibility to keep it as pristine as possible.” God did originally put the earth under man’s authority, and man passed this authority over to Satan. In any case, the ideas herein described are systems of human good. There is nothing wrong about having clean air to breathe or clean water to swim or fish in. This does not mean that it is wrong for a person with money to give to those who are in need. However, these things are not to be our focus. These different ideas—some good, some bad, some taken to an extreme—are the modern-day equivalent of sewing fig leaves together to cover ourselves. They are man trying to solve man’s problems with man’s solutions.


I have mentioned both morality and human good. These concepts are not the same. Therefore, before we go any further, let’s look at the concept of human morality.

The Doctrine of Morality

1.      One of the areas of confusion for believers is the concept of morality. Many believers and unbelievers think that morality is the spiritual life. You first get saved and then you start acting moral. However, the Christian way of life is growing in grace and the knowledge of Jesus Christ (2Peter 3:18). As a new believer, you must first learn how to get back into fellowship (after you sin, you name that sin to God; or, after you commit a variety of sins, you name them to God—1John 1:9). At the point of salvation, we are given the grace assets by which we may grow spiritually (a human spirit, the filling of the Holy Spirit, and the ability to understand, categorize and store doctrine). As we begin to grow spiritually, we will begin producing divine good, which is not the same as human good and is not the same as human morality.

2.      God designed morality for the human race as morality protects and perpetuates the human race.

3.      God has ordained 5 divine institutions: the individual person (or soul), employment, marriage, family and nation. There is a moral code for each of these divine institutions. These are institutions which will continually be under satanic attack.

4.      Take marriage, for instance: infidelity, spousal abuse, lack of commitment are acts or attitudes which destroy a marriage, and, in turn, impact a family (if there are children involved; and divorce within a family often affect the siblings of those who divorced1). The result could be the dissolution of the marriage, and children raised by a single parent are much more likely to be involved in drugs, underage drinking, teen pregnancy and crime, all of which negatively impact the nation. This is applicable to believer and unbeliever alike. The family is the key to the stability of a national entity; destroy the family and it will destroy the nation from within.

5.      Commandments 4–10 of the Ten Commandments (found in Ex. 20) are an example of a basic moral code, which can be applied to believers and unbelievers alike in any nation. This is why it is appropriate to have the Ten Commandments displayed in any courtroom and classroom.

         1)      Commandment 4: Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you will labor, and do all your work; but the seventh day is a Sabbath to Yahweh your God: you will not do any work. Although the Sabbath was given to the Jews of Israel specifically, there are aspects of it which are important to all men. Man needs a day off; he needs to recharge his batteries. Ideally speaking, man ought to turn toward God as well on a regular basis. Because creation is fundamental to all mankind, the 7-day work week is a part of almost every culture. Interestingly enough, providing more and more time off does not make a people any happier (as has been shown in Europe).

         2)      Commandment 5: Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land which Yahweh your God gives you. Again, even though this was specifically given to the Jews of Israel (this prepared them for establishing the nation Israel), this commandment is fundamental to all societies. A child may have some pretty lousy parents, but even lousy parents tend to have more wisdom than their own children. A child who listens to and obeys his parents is going to be a happier, more well-adjusted child, and society will benefit from this. Furthermore, in most cases a normal parent wants to raise his own children well.

                  (1)     This concept is constantly under satanic attack. Some examples are:

                  (2)     The anti-capitalism, pro-socialism indoctrination which has found its way into our public school system.

                  (3)     Politicians, political activists, and propagandists often appeal to children, suggesting that they are wiser than their parents and know things which their parents do not.2

                  (4)     Schools are continually introducing materials into the youngest grades possible which are contrary to the concept of family.3

         3)      Commandment 6: You will not murder. The Bible is very clear on the sin of murder; this is not the same as executing a criminal nor is this the same as killing in war (also covered in the book of Exodus). This is intentional murder of another person, whether done during a crime or to eliminate this person from your life. You remove this person from this life when you murder them, which is the first divine institution. A society cannot be run by vigilantes or by criminal organizations. When using the oft-quoted phrase An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, the Bible is referencing a system of organized justice, and not justifying vigilantism.

         4)      Commandment 7: You will not commit adultery. The 2nd divine institution, marriage, must be protected. It does not matter that a male’s normal inclination is to wander; there are boundaries to the institution of marriage, and sexual fidelity is a fundamental boundary.

         5)      Commandment 8: You will not steal. Men (and women) are allowed to accumulate wealth, possessions and land. This commandment protects property rights. Individuals should not steal from others nor should the government steal from its citizens.

         6)      Commandment 9: You will not bear false witness against your fellow man. You do not lie about someone else. Lying, as we have seen, is what led man to sin.

         7)      Commandment 10: Never desire to take your neighbor's household away from him. Never desire to take your neighbor's wife, his male or female slave, his ox, his donkey, or anything else that belongs to him. Having an intense desire for the things which belong to your neighbor is a sin which plagues mankind, and today, in the United States, this is rampant. Some people actually believe that they have the right to determine how much income is too much and how this income ought to be used. At this point in time (2009), it is this very sin which threatens to undo the economy of the United States. Rather than being satisfied with what he has, Charlie Brown thinks that it is the government’s job to take a large chunk of hedge-fund trader Lucy’s wealth and to properly distribute it to those who deserve it (this is called redistribution of wealth, spreading the wealth around, or economic justice). What is most disconcerting is, there are actually churches which teach this.

6.      A nation depends upon its citizenry as a whole to exhibit some reasonable amount of morality. If murder, stealing, and lying are rampant, that nation will destroy itself from within. A nation cannot simply survive based upon Christians alone exhibiting morality (however, mature believers in a nation will positively impact that nation).

7.      The unbeliever who goes from immorality to morality will have a better life, and sometimes people are confused by this. Let me explain: a person may become a Jehovah Witness, a scientologist or a Buddhist, and their lives may improve, and their family and friends must grudgingly admit their lives have improved. It is not because these organizations are good organizations; it is because the person involved is now engaging in moral behavior rather than immoral behavior.

8.      In the end, morality will make for better volitional choices, a better family life, and a more stable nation, but morality will not save. No one is moral enough to be saved. Luke 18:18–23 Titus 3:5 Eph. 2:8–9

The Bible also speaks to the care and provision of the helpless and the Bible speaks of legitimate taxation in both the Old and New Testaments. All of this must be taken in balance.

1 Statistically, there is a greater chance for a couple to divorce if one of their siblings has also divorced.

2 Two examples of many: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhCobR5Ql_k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbXxFUjDMiE

3 http://takeyourkidsoutofpublicschool.com/2009/06/and-tango-makes-three-%E2%80%93-a-long-way-from-dick-and-jane/


Therefore, a nation ought to be moral and a nation must establish law within its borders, as the human race is preserved (and even protected from itself) by laws and morality. However, the ultimate conflict, since the fall of man, is between man and God. Nothing is quite right until this conflict is resolved. The key is first to resolve man’s sinfulness before God.


Let me give you an example of how human good is used to attack morality, to better help you distinguish between the two. Communism is a form of human good. It strives to guide and direct an economy and its own population so that there is economic justice (this is a term developed by liberation theology, designed to distort the Bible and to promote socialism). Communism strives to reduce the inequities between men. Communism attacks and destroys human volition. Those who are not on board with a nation embracing communism are sent to reeducation camps or put in places where it is difficult to live. Often, intellectuals, recalcitrants and religious types are killed, jailed, isolated and/or reeducated. Communism is responsible for the deaths of more people than any other system in mankind’s history—and these are the deaths of their own citizens. Communism will persecute and imprison those who evangelize, as that is illegal in most communist countries. The Bible is not freely distributed in communist countries, it has to be smuggled in. A person standing on a street corner handing out free Bibles would be arrested in a communist country. Communism, a form of human good, attacks volition, which morality seeks to preserve.


Usually, the attacks of human good are far more subtle. For instance, sex education belongs within the family unit. Even though explaining the bird and the bees to one’s own child could potentially be the most embarrassing thing a parent can do with their own child, it is also potentially a rewarding experience, for both the parent and the child. The child learns about sex in the context of his own family, as related to his own person (as the child is a result of the sexual union—an act of love—between his two parents). When parents abdicate this responsibility to the school system, they remove sex from morality and from its familial context. In the end, the human good solution of sex education in our schools attacks both marriage and the family unit.


Let me give you another example of human good in the United States. We are mandated, in the United States, by the year 2014, to use compact fluorescent bulbs within our homes (I believe that incandescent bulbs will be no longer sold). These bulbs each contain 5 mg of mercury, enough to contaminate 6000 gallons of water. Those in Congress who favored this, believe that they are doing good. This is human good. In their minds, they are saving the environment. That is debatable. However, what they are introducing into millions of homes will be a toxin which can attack the brain, lungs and kidneys of those in the house exposed to mercury (if the bulb is broken at any time). Children and pregnant women are particularly susceptible to mercury poisoning. Again, this act of human good, where there was no malice intended, could result in harming a person’s volition (if that person dies or suffers physical debilitation) or that person’s family. Again, another example of where human good attacks what morality is intended to preserve. In a parallel universe, the exact same Congress would have voted to outright ban compact fluorescent bulbs, due to their toxicity.


Last time, we examined the doctrines of human good and morality, and how this is related a national entity. Morality preserves a nation; human good does not. We got into this topic because the first act of Adam and the woman was an act of human good and morality both.


Gen 3:6–7 The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making someone wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. She also gave some [of the fruit] to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it. Then their eyes were opened, and they both kept on knowing that they were naked. Therefore, they sewed fig leaves together and made a covering [or, belt, loin-cloth, kilt] for themselves.


There is no thought of God. The man and the woman have both just disobeyed God, and now they are standing there, looking at one another, and it simultaneously occurs to them that they are naked. They decide to solve this problem by covering themselves up. They are not concerned about what God thinks, or what God might do. Their thinking is strictly about solving the problems between one another, which is one form of human good.


Last time, we distinguished between human good and morality. Morality is essential for the preservation of a nation. The laws of a nation encapsulate the morality of the nation, and these laws enforce morality. A nation where morality is not enforced becomes degenerate and a nation where a false morality is imposed becomes oppressive.


What is most important to a nation is the number of believers in that nation and their spiritual growth. We find historical proof of this all around us. What is the greatest nation in the world and where in the world is the best place to live? The United States. This is because there are more believers per capita in the United States than anywhere else in the world. There is more Bible teaching in the United States than anywhere else. There are more missionaries which go out of the United States than anywhere else. Now, where would be the worse place in the world to live? In Arab nations where Christianity is illegal; or in Communist nations where Christianity is illegal or strictly controlled (where proselytizing is illegal). We have thousands of people who will hop on anything which floats and risk their lives to go from what could potentially be an island paradise in Cuba and float to the United States. We do not have any reverse traffic. Even though Michael Moore did a film touting the medical system in Cuba, he did not renounce his American citizenship and move to Cuba. We had a handful of Congressmen go to Cuba this past year (2009) and praise Fidel Castro, whom they met personally; yet not one of them looked into the possibility of moving to Cuba permanently.


Now, you may have formed a counter-argument in your mind, and you are thinking, what about Mexico? Mexicans flock to America in droves, yet isn’t Mexico as Christian as the United States? It is not. In this Bible study, I have avoided the discussion of various branches of Christianity, and for the most part, I will continue to do so. However, Satan can disguise himself as an angel of light and there are those who present themselves as apostles of Christ, yet are not. 2Cor. 11:13–15 speaks of false teachers in the church: For such ones are false apostles, deceitful workers transforming themselves into apostles of Christ. And did not Satan marvelously transform himself into an angel of light? It is not a dramatic thing, then, if also his ministers transform themselves into ministers of righteousness, whose end will be according to their works.


There are two places at which Satan attempts to attack mankind: he first wants to blind us to the gospel and he secondly wants to destroy the spiritual life of—and therefore the spiritual impact of—the believer in time (2Cor. 4:4 11:13–15 1John 1:8–10). Catholicism contributes to both of these attacks.


If you ask the average Catholic how to be saved, he or she is going to give you a lengthy list of things which must be done (believing in Christ, being baptized, joining the Catholic church, partaking in Communion). There are a few Catholics who are more or less squared away in this area, and they will tell you that all you need to do is to believe in Jesus Christ. A Catholic who believes that they are saved by faith alone in Christ alone is saved; but not all Catholics believe this (to be fair, neither do some Protestant groups, who disparagingly call this easy-believism). Our salvation is based upon Christ’s work on the cross, not upon our own works. Faith is a non-meritorious system of perception. Everyone has faith. Everyone has a set of things in which they believe. In fact, it is estimated that 70–95% of everything we know is based upon faith. The other two systems of perception—empiricism and rationalism—require experiences and thinking, and are therefore, meritorious systems of perception. We simply choose to believe in this or to not believe in that. So, our contribution toward our own salvation is nothing, as faith requires absolutely no effort on our part and no inherent good can be attributed to us because we have faith. So, when we believe that Jesus died for our sins, our Lord has done 100% of the work and we are depending 100% upon His work.


No matter what a person has done, no matter how they were brought up, no matter what church they go to or do not go to, if they exercise faith alone in Christ alone, they are saved. Therefore, there are saved Catholics, and there are some Catholic churches which (presumably) teach the gospel moderately well. However, many Catholic churches throw in all of the sacraments and tie this to salvation, and that is Satanic. A priest or bishop who teaches that salvation requires anything more than faith alone in Christ alone is an apostle of Satan and an apostle of deceit, who presents himself as an apostle of light (regardless of the denomination).


The Catholic also believes in what is called infused grace rather than imputed grace (although most Catholics and Protestants are unaware of these terms, even though these terms are fundamental in defining the difference between these two groups). To the Catholic, a person who has truly believed in Jesus Christ will join the Catholic Church; they will go to Mass and to Confession; they will be baptized. Faith in Christ, according to many Catholics, will result in an infusion of the Christ-nature. In other words, the true Christian will exhibit Christian behavior (some Protestants believe this as well). If you suggest that someone can believe in Christ and then go out and murder and commit adultery, bestiality or any other sexual sin you can imagine; and cheat and lie in business, this will not compute in the mind of the Catholic. They cannot separate Christian faith from the actions of the believer, even if they themselves are guilty of these sins. As a result, people can be raised in the Catholic Church from age 0 up and yet never exercise faith alone in Christ alone for their salvation. They learn to be moral but they never exercise faith alone in Christ alone. They have built their house upon sand, and it will not endure. Even if a person is a devout Catholic all of their lives, but never exercises faith alone in Christ alone, they are not saved and they will spend eternity in the Lake of Fire. Jesus will say, “I never knew you.”


To put it in a different way, you can be raised from birth to be a Catholic, a Muslim, a Buddhist or a Jew; but you cannot be raised from birth as a Christian. Every person must make for themselves a decision to believe in Christ, and this decision can occur at the earliest sometimes between ages 4 and 6; and as late as on one’s deathbed—but no one is saved unless they exercise faith alone in Christ alone.


And so that there is no misunderstanding, anyone can believe in Jesus Christ. They can be Catholic, Muslim, Buddhist or of the Jewish faith—if they, at any point in their lives, exercise faith alone in Christ alone, they are eternally saved at that point, no matter what. They might even return to their false religion, but they are still saved. If we [believers in Jesus Christ; Paul was a believer writing to Timothy, who was a believer] are faithless, He remains faithful, for He cannot deny Himself (2Tim. 2:13). Our salvation rests upon what Christ did, not upon anything which we do. Once we have been saved, God cannot go back and change His mind about us, because He cannot deny Himself.


The second problem with the Catholic Church lines up with Satan’s attack on believers: the Catholic Church (and many other churches, for that matter) neutralize the believer’s impact in this life; it neutralizes the Christian’s daily walk, which is what Satan wants. If Satan cannot blind a person to the gospel, then he desires that the individual believer has absolutely no spiritual impact. Some people do attend Catholic churches all of their lives and yet they still believe in Jesus Christ, and the faith they exercise is conscious and directed toward only Christ. However, the Catholic Church then attacks their Christian life. The end result—and again, let me emphasize this applies to many Protestant Christian churches as well, not just to Catholic churches—is we have believers who are stunted in spiritual growth and in spiritual production. Believers become moral and they learn to hide the parts of their personality which those in the church would not like, but they do not grow spiritually and they do not produce divine good.


There are two things a believer needs to learn after salvation: (1) when we get out of fellowship by sinning, we can only get back into fellowship by naming our sins to God (silently and apart from the church or clergy or anything else). If we acknowledge our sins [to God], He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness (1John 1:9). This takes us from being out of fellowship to being in fellowship; from quenching or grieving the Spirit to being filled with the Spirit. No man is able to forgive sins, so we do not go to a priest now and again to ask for forgiveness of sins (or for a list of things we must do or feel in order to be forgiven of our sins). A believer who is out of fellowship for all of his life has absolutely no contribution to the plan of God. If you think that your sins are forgiven by going to a priest, and then by doing a series of acts of contrition afterwards, then you are never back in fellowship, which means you have no spiritual impact whatsoever (which is Satan’s goal). (2) Secondly, we grow in grace and knowledge of the Word of God (2Peter 3:18). If the Bible is taught incorrectly (or not taught at all) and if believers think that they must confess their sins to a priest in order to be forgiven, then the function of the growth of believers in the church is short-circuited because no one is in fellowship or learning the Word of God (you cannot learn the Word of God if you are not in fellowship). This is every bit as evil as taking a child at age 3 and locking him in a closet until age 10. He will emerge permanently undeveloped with limited mental facilities (these are called wild children). Doing such a thing to a child is the epitome of evil. The Catholic church does this to those who believe in Jesus. It stunts their spiritual growth, substituting for it, morality and rituals. Again, to be fair, many Protestant churches today, do exactly the same thing. The end result is, a congregation of people who are generally moral (which is a good thing to the nation), but who have absolutely no spiritual impact (which is bad for a nation).


How is this bad? In one generation—overnight, insofar as a nation is concerned—you can raise up a generation of children who do not believe in Jesus Christ. You can have on your hands one complete generation of those who have not placed there trust in Christ, and this dramatically changes the character of a nation, virtually overnight.


The key to a nation’s prosperity is: (1) people are evangelized accurately and without legal restrictions, and that many of them respond to this evangelization. (2) Churches accurately teach the Word of God and teach it often (daily is best way for doctrine to be learned; no one can learn the Christian life by going to church once a week). (3) A nation sends out missionaries who accurately teach the gospel. (4) Also, a nation’s relationship to the Jews in its own land and to Jews elsewhere (including the nation Israel) is a factor. Even though many Jews are unbelievers, they are still God’s people and God will use them in the end times. No nation should promote anti-Semitism in any form (e.g., teach that there are great world-wide conspiracies controlled by Jews; or that there is some sort of moral equivalency between the nation Israel and the Palestinians). The more closely a nation follows these 4 principles, the greater God will bless that nation. In the United States, there are tens of thousands of churches which correctly present the gospel of Jesus Christ. There are thousands of missionaries sent out which properly teach the gospel of Jesus Christ. There are many churches which teach the spiritual life in the United States. We also have, in general, a good attitude toward the Jews and toward the nation Israel. It is this relationship between man and God which is the key to the great success of the United States. The more people who see their relationship with God as being the most important aspect of their lives, the better off a nation is. People who look first to solving the fundamental problem between man and God; rather than making vain attempts to solve problems between men, preserve a nation. Adam and the woman looked to solve problems between one another. God was not in their thinking.


What about a Muslim nation where their relationship with God is foremost? The problem here is, they have developed a relationship with Satan, and not with God. Jesus Christ said, “I am the way, the truth and the life; no man comes to the Father but through Me.” (John 14:6). Being a religious nation is not the same as being a nation where many or most of the people believe in Jesus Christ. Again, there are problems with any nation where its focus is on anything rather than Jesus Christ. A nation which places its hope in a man (Buddha, Mohammed, its president or prime minister) or in some system of government (socialism or communism), that nation will never be great and prosperous. In Europe, the governments tax a great deal, but they provide quite a safety net for their people, in terms of medical benefits, unemployment and sustenance. However, the happiness rate of these people, determined simply by asking them if they are happy or satisfied with their lives, is much lower than it is in, say, the United States. Their problem is, they are focused on solving problems which exist between men, just as Adam and the woman focused on solving the problems between one another. This approach solves nothing.


I realize that I have gone far afield here, but let me remind you of where we started and how we got here: the key to human interaction is not solving moral problems between people but breaking down the wall of enmity between man and God. To illustrate the importance of man first dealing with his relationship to God, I used the United States. We live in the greatest nation at any period of time because we were founded as a nation based upon man’s relationship to God; and the United States continues to be a great nation because many people in the United States see their relationship to God as being their most fundamental relationship. For this reason, God has greatly blessed the United States.


Adam and the woman looked at each other and decided that, in order to solve their problems, they needed to adjust to one another, which they did by wearing fig leaves. However, the key to our problems and solving them is our relationship with God, not with each other. Putting on fig leaves, an act of human good, did not improve anything between Adam and the woman.


Then, because it is a related topic, we needed to examine morality. Adam and the woman were fixing a moral problem with an act of human good and morality (human good and morality can overlap and they can be in opposition to one another). Therefore, we examined human good and then we examined morality, which are different things. Also, related to this was, morality is important to preserve the divine institutions. Human good can be quite problematic, but morality is important to a nation; yet morality is not the Christian way of life.


Then we took this one step further, and looked at nations. The people of a nation can be first concerned with their relationship to God or they can be concerned primarily with the relationship between one another. We can see the end results of this focus by observing nations where evangelism and Christian growth are an inherent part of that nation; and then comparing them to nations where Christianity is outlawed or carefully moderated or strictly controlled by the government.


Because we went down this road, I had to differentiate between Christian religions, some of which distort the gospel and distort the spiritual life and some of which do not. This explains why, for instance, life is so good in the United States and yet so bleak in Mexico (as an example). It should be even more obvious when we compare the United States to Communist or socialist nations, which are at enmity with the Word of God (to various degrees) and to Muslim nations, where Satan is worshiped.


Adam and the woman’s problem was not that they were both naked; their problem was, that they had disobeyed the Word of God. Their problem was not with each other, but with God. The solution to their problem was not putting on fig leaves to cover themselves, but they would have to look to God to solve this problem.

 

At this point, Adam and the woman are spiritually dead. Arthur Pink: But what does Scripture mean when it says the sinner is "dead"? This is something which seems absurd to the natural man. And to him it is absurd. "The natural man receives not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned" (1 Cor. 2:14). To the natural man it seems that he is very much alive. Yes, and Scripture itself speaks of one that lives in pleasure as being "dead while she lives" (1 Tim. 5:6). Herein lies the key to the meaning of that expression employed by our Lord in His teaching upon the Good Samaritan. Describing the condition of the natural man under the figure of one who had fallen among thieves, who had stripped him of his raiment and left him wounded by the wayside, the Savior termed him "half dead" (Luke 10:30). Mark then the absolute accuracy of Christ’s words. The sinner is "half dead": he is alive manward, worldward, sinward, but he is dead Godward! The sinner is alive naturally- physically, mentally, morally- but he is dead spiritually. That is why the new birth is termed a "passing from death unto life" (John 5:24). And just as the deadness of Abraham and Sarah- in their case natural deadness, for they but foreshadowed spiritual truths had to be quickened by God before Isaac could be born, so has the sinner to be quickened by God into newness of life before he can become a son of God.


——————————


And so they hear a sound of Yehowah Elohim walking in the garden for a spirit of the day. And so hides himself, the man and his woman from faces of Yehowah Elohim in midst of a tree of the garden.

Genesis

3:8

When they heard the sound [or, voice] of Yehowah Elohim walking in the garden with regards to the spirit of the day, the man hides himself and his woman, from the presence of Yehowah Elohim among the trees of the garden.

When they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the spiritual part of the day, the man and the woman hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden.


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And they heard the voice of the word of the Lord God walking in the garden in the repose of the day; and Adam and his wife hid themselves from before the Lord God among the trees of the garden.

Latin Vulgate                          And when they heard the voice of the Lord God walking in paradise at the afternoon air, Adam and his wife hid themselves from the face of the Lord God, amidst the trees of paradise.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so they hear a sound of Yehowah Elohim in the garden for a spirit of the day. And so hides himself, the man and his woman from faces of Yehowah Elohim in midst of a tree of the garden.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day; and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God among the trees of the garden.

Septuagint (Greek)                And they heard the voice of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day; and both Adam and his wife hid themselves from the face of the Lord God in the midst of the trees of the garden.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Common English Bible           During that day's cool evening breeze, they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden; and the man and his wife hid themselves from the Lord God in the middle of the garden's trees.

Contemporary English V.       Late in the afternoon a breeze began to blow, and the man and woman heard the LORD God walking in the garden. They were frightened and hid behind some trees.

Easy English                          The man and woman heard God walk in the garden in the cool evening. They hid away from God. They hid among the trees in the garden.

Easy-to-Read Version            During the cool part of the day, the Lord God was walking in the garden. The man and the woman heard him, and they hid among the trees in the garden.

Good News Bible (TEV)         That evening they heard the LORD God walking in the garden, and they hid from him among the trees.

The Message                         When they heard the sound of GOD strolling in the garden in the evening breeze, the Man and his Wife hid in the trees of the garden, hid from GOD.

New Berkeley Version           In the cool of the day [The hour of twilight remains a choice season for spiritual recreation—quiet communion] they heard the sound of the Lord God taking a walk in the garden and the man and his wife hid themselves among the trees of the garden from the presence of the Lord God.

New Living Translation           When the cool evening breezes were blowing, the man [Or Adam, and so throughout the chapter.] and his wife heard the Lord God walking about in the garden. So they hid from the Lord God among the trees.


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          Then they heard the voice of Jehovah God as He walked around in Paradise at dusk; so Adam and his woman hid from the face of Jehovah God, among the trees of Paradise.

Ancient Roots Translinear      They heard the voice of Yahweh God going in the garden with the Spirit-wind in the day. Adam and his woman concealed in the midst the trees of the garden from the face of Yahweh God.

Beck’s American Translation At the time of the day when there was a breeze, they heard the LORD God walking in the garden, and the man and his wife hid from the LORD God among the trees in the garden.

Christian Community Bible     They heard the voice of Yahweh God walking in the garden, in the cool of the day, and they, the man and his wife, hid from Yahweh God among the trees of the garden.

New American Bible              When they heard the sound of the LORD God walking about in the garden at the breezy time of the day [The breezy time of the day: lit., "the wind of the day." Probably shortly before sunset.], the man and his wife hid themselves from the LORD God among the trees of the garden. Jer 23:24.

NIRV                                      Then the man and his wife heard the Lord God walking in the garden. It was the coolest time of the day. They hid from the Lord God among the trees of the garden.

New Simplified Bible              The man and his wife heard the sound (voice) of Jehovah God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day. They hid from Jehovah, among the trees of the garden.


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And there came to them the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the evening wind: and the man and his wife went to a secret place among the trees of the garden, away from the eyes of the Lord God.

Complete Jewish Bible           They heard the voice of ADONAI, God, walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, so the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of ADONAI, God, among the trees in the garden.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 They then heard the sound of the Ever-living God moving in the Garden in the breeze of the day; and the man and the woman hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the Garden.

HCSB                                     Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, and they hid themselves from the LORD God among the trees of the garden.

 

PS (Tanakh—1985)                 They heard the sound of the Lord God moving about in the garden at the breezy time of the day; and the man and his wife hid from the Lord God among the trees of the garden.

New Advent Bible                  And when they heard the voice of the Lord God walking in paradise at the afternoon air, Adam and his wife hid themselves from the face of the Lord God, amidst the trees of paradise.

NET Bible®                             The Judgment Oracles of God at the Fall

Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God moving about [The Hitpael participle of ?????? (halakh, "to walk, to go") here has an iterative sense, "moving" or "going about." While a translation of "walking about" is possible, it assumes a theophany, the presence of the Lord God in a human form. This is more than the text asserts.] in the orchard at the breezy time [The expression is traditionally rendered "cool of the day," because the Hebrew word ????? (ruakh) can mean "wind." U. Cassuto (Genesis: From Adam to Noah, 152-54) concludes after lengthy discussion that the expression refers to afternoon when it became hot and the sun was beginning to decline. J. J. Niehaus (God at Sinai [SOTBT], 155-57) offers a different interpretation of the phrase, relating ???? (yom, usually understood as "day") to an Akkadian cognate umu ("storm") and translates the phrase "in the wind of the storm." If Niehaus is correct, then God is not pictured as taking an afternoon stroll through the orchard, but as coming in a powerful windstorm to confront the man and woman with their rebellion. In this case ???? ?????? (qol yÿhvah, "sound of the Lord") may refer to God's thunderous roar, which typically accompanies his appearance in the storm to do battle or render judgment (e.g., see Ps 29).] of the day, and they hid [The verb used here is the Hitpael, giving the reflexive idea ("they hid themselves"). In v. 10, when Adam answers the Lord, the Niphal form is used with the same sense: "I hid."] from the LORD God among the trees of the orchard.


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Concordant Literal Version    And hearing are they the sound of Yahweh Elohim walking in the garden in the windy part of the day. And hiding themselves are the human and his wife from the face of Yahweh Elohim, in the midst of a tree of the garden.

Context Group Version          And they heard the voice of YHWH God walking in the garden in the Spirit { or wind; same word as 1: 2 } of the day: and the man and his woman { or wife } hid themselves from the presence of YHWH God among the trees of the garden.

Emphasized Bible                  Then heard they the sound of Yahweh God, walking to and fro in the garden at the breeze of the day,—so he hid himself—the man with his wife, from the face of Yahweh God, amid the trees of the garden.

exeGeses companion Bible   And they hear the voice of Yah Veh Elohim

walking in the garden in the wind of the day:

and Adam and his woman hide themselves

from the face of Yah Veh Elohim

among the trees of the garden.

Green’s Literal Translation    And they heard the voice of The LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam hid himself and his wife did so too, among the trees of the garden from the presence of The LORD God.

Heritage Bible                        And they attentively heard the voice of Jehovah God walking in the garden in the Spirit of the day, and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the face of Jehovah God among the trees of the garden. in the Spirit of the day; the phrase is very clearly in the Spirit, ruwach, the word regularly translated Spirit. KJV has the cool of the day which is an interpretation of ruwach not justified by the Hebrew usage, and gives no clear sense in this verse. God always walks in the Spirit of the day, because His Spirit is always of the day, that is, light, not darkness. God came to Adam and Eve in the light of revelation of the Holy Spirit to reveal to them what they had done and reveal to them salvation from their sin. It was the daylight of God’s revelation knowledge that caused them to hide themselves in their own darkness from the light in which God came to them. He had to call them out from the darkness of their hiding into the light of His salvation. See Rom 13:13; 1 The 5:4-8.

Syndein                                  {Evidence of Spiritual Death}

And it came to their ears the voice of the Jehovah/God Elohim/Godhead walking around in the garden {looking for them} in the spiritual time of the day {the time for doctrinal teaching}. Consequently the man {adam} and the woman {Ishah} hid themselves from the presence of the Jehovah/God Elohim/Godhead in the middle of one tree of the garden. {Note: This verse demonstrates the inadequacy of human 'works'. They hid from God even though 'operation fig leaf' was a success!}.

World English Bible                They heard the voice of Yahweh God walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of Yahweh God among the trees of the garden.

Young's Literal Translation     And they hear the sound of Jehovah God walking up and down in the garden at the breeze of the day, and the man and his wife hide themselves from the face of Jehovah God in the midst of the trees of the garden.

 

The gist of this verse:          The man and the woman hear Yehowah God walking through the garden in the spiritual part of the day, and they hide themselves in the midst of the trees in the garden.


Genesis 3:8a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

shâmaʿ (שָמַע) [pronounced shaw-MAHĢ]

to listen [intently], to hear, to listen and obey, [or, and act upon, give heed to, take note of], to hearken to, to be attentive to, to listen and be cognizant of

3rd person masculine plural, Qal imperfect

Strong's #8085 BDB #1033

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

generally untranslated; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

qôwl (קוֹל) [pronounced kohl]

sound, voice, noise; loud noise, thundering

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6963 BDB #876

This is the first time in the Bible we have the very common words to hear and voice, sound.

YHWH (יהוה) [pronunciation is possibly yhoh-WAH]

transliterated variously as Jehovah, Yahweh, Yehowah

proper noun

Strong’s #3068 BDB #217

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43


Translation: When they heard the sound [or, voice] of Yehowah Elohim... The word found here can refer to the sound or voice of Jehovah Elohim. It appears to be sound, based upon what follows.

 

From the New Advent Bible website: (paradeisos, Paradises). The name popularly given in Christian tradition to the scriptural Garden of Eden, the home of our first parents (Genesis 2). The word paradise is probably of Persian origin and signified originally a royal park or pleasure ground. The term does not occur in the Latin of the Classic period nor in the Greek writers prior to the time of Xenophon. In the Old Testament it is found only in the later Hebrew writings in the form (Pardês), having been borrowed doubtless from the Persian. An instructive illustration of the origin and primary meaning of the term appears in II Esdras (ii, 8) where "Asaph the keeper of the king's forest" (happerdês) is the custodian of the royal park of the Persian ruler. The association of the term with the abode of our first parents does not occur in the Old-Testament Hebrew. It originated in the fact that the word paradeisos was adopted, though not exclusively, by the translators of the Septuagint to render the Hebrew for the Garden of Eden described in the second chapter of Genesis. It is likewise used in diverse other passages of the Septuagint where the Hebrew generally has "garden", especially if the idea of wondrous beauty is to be conveyed. Thus in Genesis 13:10, the "country about the Jordan" is described as a "paradise of the Lord" (rendering followed by the Vulgate). Cf. Numbers 24:6 (Greek) where the reference is to the beautiful array of the tents of Israel, also Isaiah 1:30; Ezekiel 31:8-9 etc. Those interested in speculation as to the probable location of the Scriptural Garden of Eden, the primeval home of mankind, are referred to the scholarly work of Friedrich Delitsch, "Wo lag das Paradies?" (Berlin, 1881). In the New Testament period the word paradise appears with a new and more exalted meaning. In the development of Jewish eschatology which marks the post-Exilic epoch the word paradise or "Garden of God", hitherto mainly associated with the original dwelling-place of our first parents, was transferred to signify the future abode of rest and enjoyment which was to be the reward of the righteous after death. The term occurs only three times in the New Testament, though the idea which it represents is frequently expressed in other terms, v.g. "Abraham's bosom" (Luke 16:22). The signification of the word in these remarkably few passages can be determined only from the context and by reference to the eschatological notions current among the Jews of that period. These views are gathered chiefly from the Rabbinical literature, the works of Josephus, and from the apocryphal writings, notably the Book of Enoch, the Book of Jubilees, the Apocalypse of Baruch, etc. An inspection of these sources reveals a great confusion of ideas and many contradictions regarding the future paradise as also concerning the original Garden of Eden and the condition of our first parents. The scanty references to Sheol which embody the vague eschatological beliefs of the Hebrews as expressed in the earlier Old Testament writings give place in these later treatises to elaborate theories worked out with detailed descriptions and speculations often of a most fanciful character. As a sample of these may be noted the one found in the Talmudic tract "Jalkut Schim., Bereschith, 20". According to this description the entrance to paradise is made through two gates of rubies beside which stand sixty myriads of holy angels with countenances radiant with heavenly splendor. When a righteous man enters, the vestures of death are removed from him; he is clad in eight robes of the clouds of glory; two crowns are placed upon his head, one of pearls and precious stones, the other of gold; eight myrtles are placed in his hands and he is welcomed with great applause, etc. Some of the Rabbinical authorities appear to identify the paradise of the future with the primeval Garden of Eden which is supposed to be still in existence and located somewhere in the far-distant East. According to some it was an earthly abode, sometimes said to have been created before the rest of the world (IV Esdras iii, 7, cf. viii, 52); others make it an adjunct of the subterranean Sheol, while still others place it in or near heaven. It was believed that there are in paradise different degrees of blessedness. Seven ranks or orders of the righteous were said to exist within it, and definitions were given both of those to whom these different positions belong and of the glories pertaining to each ("Baba bathra", 75 a, quoted by Salmond, Hastings, "Dict. of the Bible", s.v. "Paradise"). The uncertainty and confusion of the current Jewish ideas concerning paradise may explain the paucity of reference to it in the New Testament. The first mention of the word occurs in Luke 23:43, where Jesus on the cross says to the penitent thief: "Amen I say to thee, this day thou shalt be with me in paradise". According to the prevailing interpretation of Catholic theologians and commentators, paradise in this instance is used as a synonym for the heaven of the blessed to which the thief would accompany the Saviour, together with the souls of the righteous of the Old Law who were awaiting the coming of the Redeemer. In II Corinthians (xii, 4) St. Paul describing one of his ecstasies tells his readers that he was "caught up into paradise". Here the term seems to indicate plainly the heavenly state or abode of the blessed implying possibly a glimpse of the beatific vision. The reference cannot be to any form of terrestrial paradise, especially when we consider the parallel expression in verse 2, where relating a similar experience he says he was "caught up to the third heaven". The third and last mention of paradise in the New Testament occurs in the Apocalypse (2:7), where St. John, receiving in vision a Divine message for the "angel of the church of Ephesus", hears these words: "To him that overcometh, I will give to eat of the tree of life, which is in the paradise of my God." In this passage the word is plainly used to designate the heavenly kingdom, though the imagery is borrowed from the description of the primeval Garden of Eden in the Book of Genesis. According to Catholic theology based on the Biblical account, the original condition of our first parents was one of perfect innocence and integrity. By the latter is meant that they were endowed with many prerogatives which, while pertaining to the natural order, were not due to human nature as such--hence they are sometimes termed preternatural. Principal among these were a high degree of infused knowledge, bodily immortality and freedom from pain, and immunity from evil impulses or inclinations. In other words, the lower or animal nature in man was perfectly subjected to the control of reason and the will. Besides this, our first parents were also endowed with sanctifying grace by which they were elevated to the supernatural order. But all these gratuitous endowments were forfeited through the disobedience of Adam "in whom all have sinned", and who was "a figure of Him who was to come" (Romans 5) and restore fallen man, not to an earthly, but to a heavenly paradise.


Genesis 3:8b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

hâlake (הָלַךְ) [pronounced haw-LAHKe]

to go, to come, to depart, to walk [up and down, about]; to wander, to prowl; to go for oneself, to go about, to live [walk] [in truth]; to flow

Hithpael participle

Strong’s #1980 (and #3212) BDB #229

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to, with reference to, as to, with regards to; belonging to; by

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

The meanings of the lâmed preposition broken down into groups: ➊ to, towards, unto; it is used both to turn one’s heart toward someone as well as to sin against someone; ➋ to, even to;  in this sense, it can be used with a number to indicate the upper limit which a multitude might approach (nearly). ➌ Lâmed can be equivalent to the Greek preposition eis (εἰς), meaning into, as in transforming into something else, changing into something else (Gen. 2:7). This use of lâmed after the verb hâyâh (הָיָה) [pronounced haw-YAW] (Strong’s #1961 BDB #224) is one thing becoming another (Gen. 2:7). ➍  Its fourth use is the mark of a dative, after verbs of giving, granting, delivering, pardoning, consulting, sending, etc. This type of dative is broken down into several categories, but one includes the translation by, which would be apropos here. ➎ With regards to, as to. Similar to the Greek preposition eis (εἰς) plus the dative. [Numbering from Gesenius]. ➏ On account of, because, propter, used of cause and reason (propter means because; Gesenius used it). ➐ Concerning, about, used of a person or thing made the object of discourse, after verbs of saying. ➑ On behalf of anyone, for anyone. ➒ As applied to a rule or standard, according to, according as, as though, as if. ➓ When associated with time, it refers to the point of time at which or in which anything is done; or it can refer to the space of time during which something is done (or occurs); at the time of.

rûwach (רוּחַ) [pronounced ROO-ahkh]

wind, breath, spirit, apparition

feminine singular construct

Strong’s #7307 BDB #924

yôwm (יוֹם) [pronounced yohm]

day; time; today (with a definite article)

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong’s #3117 BDB #398


Translation: ...walking in the garden with regards to the spirit of the day,... What Adam and the woman apparently hear is the sound of God walking in the garden.


Now, nearly every translation has something like in the cool [breeze] of the day; but the first problem with this is the preposition in. It is not found here. The lâmed preposition means to, for, towards, in regards to, with reference to, as to, with regards to; belonging to; by. This suggests that there was a time during the day when the Lord came to speak with Adam and the woman. When they heard Him coming, they hid.


The woman had been deceived by Satan (the serpent), and she took of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and ate that fruit. Her sin was real and permanent, but her sin was a result of her being deceived. However, Adam, when he returned from work to the woman, was not deceived. The woman simply handed him the fruit and he ate the fruit which God had forbidden him to eat. His sin was one of cognizance. He clearly understood that he was disobeying God in order to stay with the woman, whom he loved. Adam could reasonably say, “There is no one else for me on this entire earth.”


Gen 3:6 The woman saw that the tree had fruit that was good to eat, pleasant to look at, and desirable for making one wise. So she took some of the fruit and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.


The first act of the man and woman was an act of human good because of a perceived moral problem, as they now how a knowledge of good and evil. So, they covered up their nakedness with fig leaves.


Gen 3:7 Then their eyes were opened, and they both kept on knowing that they were naked. Therefore, they sewed fig leaves together and made a covering [or, belt, loin-cloth, kilt] for themselves.


The response of the man and the woman to this situation was to try to improve things between one another. They gave no thought to God. Neither one said, “We have disobeyed Jehovah Elohim; what shall be do?” Their first thought was to each other and their nakedness, and how that problem ought to be resolved.


Interestingly enough, the man and the woman had the wherewithal to sew together fig leaves. I have suggested previously that not only were these two geniuses, but that they probably had developed tools to work with. In a very short amount of time, they figured out a way to attach the leaves together and to attach these leaves to their own bodies.


Adam and the woman had souls, but they did not have human spirits anymore. They had been warned, “In dying, you will die.” The death which they experienced immediately was spiritual death. What separates man from animals is the soul. It is the soul which allows for us think and to relate to one another. Man’s soul is made up of his mentality, memory, vocabulary, emotion, conscience (norms and standards), volition and self-consciousness. The study of wild children reveals to us that soul development can be permanently arrested by limiting the stimulation of the soul throughout the developing years.


The human spirit is that immaterial part of man which allows man to interact with God. Adam and the woman had their human spirits shut down when they ate the fruit. Therefore, they gave no thought to God.


Gen 3:8 In the cool [literally, in the spirit] of the evening, the man and his woman heard the LORD God [Yehowah Elohim] walking around in the garden. So they hid from the LORD God among the trees in the garden.


Tree is in the singular, but then it is in the singular back in Gen. 1:11. It behaves like our word forest—it can in the singular refer to trees in the collective sense. Walking and hid are both in the Hithpael stem, which is reflexive. The time of day in the NASB is translated as the cool of the day (or, the wind breeze of the day). The New Revised Standard Version calls this at the time of the evening breeze. Even the Emphasized Bible gives several similar renderings. The Amplified Bible doesn't amplify anything here. It is just cool of the day. I mentions this to show how having several translations does not always give you a better idea of what is being presented. Certainly, you're thinking, big deal, it's moderately chilly, there's a breeze in the air and maybe it's daytime or early evening; I've got the gist of it. There are two nouns here, the second one being the common noun for day and found in Gen. 1:5,8,14,19, etc. The first word found here is rûwach (רוּחַ) [pronounced ROO-ahkh]. Rûwach has several meanings and this word has already occurred in Genesis 1:2 and it can be translated wind, breath or breeze, but it is usually translated spirit. This is the spiritual part of the day; this is when God came to talk with Adam and the woman in the garden; to have fellowship with them and to teach them.


God's Word, good food, right man/right woman and sex were all a part of perfect environment. What is indicated by this phrase is that there was a particular portion of the day devoted to fellowship with God. You cannot grow spiritually on Sunday worship service; nor can you grow spiritually by attending Sunday worship, Sunday school and Sunday evenings. We are continually inundated with human viewpoint; every person that we talk to, everything that we read and everything that we see on television is filled with human viewpoint. We are constantly bathed in the devil's world with human viewpoint. We are brainwashed and socially conditioned to think in certain ways; to believe certain things. Take any page of the newspaper, any ten minutes on television, any five-minute conversation with another person. You are receiving a way of thinking, a standard that you are to adhere to in the devil's world and it is wrong. Often there is just enough truth mixed in there to make it palatable. We only have one line of defense and that is God's Word. There is only one way to live in this devil's world and it begins with our thinking. If Adam and the woman required fellowship with God and spiritual truth on a daily basis to where there was a specific time period set aside for this; then how much more do we as Christians need this fellowship and feeding on the Word?


The man and the woman have been receiving Bible teaching from Jesus Christ in the garden for perhaps a century and they do not remember that God is omnipresent. They do not flee the garden because that is their home. This is not unlike hiding in a closet or the attic of one's home. They do not call out to God; they do not present themselves to God. They are in a fallen state. They do not know how to have fellowship with God nor do they desire fellowship with God. God will have to make all of the first moves in order restore fellowship in this new world. Therefore, God will call to them.


Gen 3:8 In the cool [literally, in the spirit] of the evening, the man and his woman heard the LORD God [Yehowah Elohim] walking around in the garden. So they hid from the LORD God among the trees in the garden.


We need to look at the Trinity again. There is God the Father, Who planned everything. He designed us, and these blueprints of His design are our genetic code (just as you may have blueprints to your house in the attic, we carry around the blueprints for us in most of the cells of our body). God the Father is a Spirit and He must be worshiped by means of the filling of the Spirit and in the truth of the Word of God (John 4:24). We are unable to see God the Father (John 1:18 6:46). The 3rd member of the Trinity is God the Holy Spirit, Who provides the power, the energy, the life for all things. The Holy Spirit does not speak from Himself but according to the plan of God (John 16:13). The second member of the Trinity is God the Son, the revealed member of the Trinity. Throughout the Old Testament, God will appear to various people in a variety of ways. These are called theophanies. It is He Who will be born of the woman. So, the Lord God here (Yehowah Elohim) is the 2nd person of the Trinity. Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, but in these last days He has spoken to us by His Son, whom He [God the Father, the Planner] appointed the Heir of all things, through [= by means of] Whom also He created the world. He [Jesus Christ] is the radiance of the glory of God [i.e., the essence and character of God] and the exact imprint of His nature [Jesus Christ is God], and He upholds the universe by the word of His power. After making purification for sins, He sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high (Heb. 1:1–3).


Most often when we find the name Yehowah Elohim in the Old Testament, we are referring to the revealed member of the Trinity. Whatever form God chooses to take—whether a burning bush, a cloud, or a form similar to ours—this form is called a theophany. In the New Testament, there will be no more theophanies, because He reveals Himself as Jesus Christ. This is a true metamorphism. God the Son will undergo an actual change in becoming the God-man. At this point in human history, God the Son does not simply take the form of a man—as a temporary manifestation—but He actually becomes man, born of a woman, the Seed of the woman, Who will crush the head of Satan (Gen. 3:15). In the fullness of time, God sent forth His Son, having come into being out from a woman (Gal. 4:4a).


Properly, in the Old Testament, when God makes Himself known to this or that person, this is Jehovah Elohim, the 2nd person of the Trinity. How He reveals Himself is a temporary physical manifestation. However, when Jesus is born of a woman, this will reflect a real and eternal change. This is God the Son’s eternal form from this point in history on. There is no need to sing the song, What if God was one of us; He is one of us. God the Son entered into human history—He entered into time—and was eternally changed by becoming man.


Gen 3:8a In the cool [literally, spiritual] of the day, the man and his woman heard the LORD God walking around in the garden.


Now Jesus Christ (Jehovah Elohim) came to Adam and the woman every day in the cool of the day, to teach them Bible doctrine. The word that most Bibles translate as cool is rûwach (רוּחַ) [pronounced ROO-ahkh], which means wind, breath, spirit, apparition. Strong’s #7307 BDB #924. We have found this word once already in the book of Genesis, back in Gen. 1:2: The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.


Adam and the woman did not think about God or talk about God after they sinned. They sinned and the first thing they did was cover themselves with fig leaves, an act of human good and human morality. They do not say to one another, “What will we say when Yehowah comes into the garden? How will we explain this to Him?” God had warned them, “In dying, you will die.” When they ate of the forbidden fruit, they immediately died spiritually. They looked at one another and tried to solve that problem of nakedness, but they did not think about God. They each had a human soul, so that they could relate to one another, but their human spirits had been shut down.


Yehowah coming to them during the spirit of the day was, apparently, a daily occurrence. We learn two things by this. There is a time daily in which we ought to commune with God. That is, there is time which ought to be devoted in each day to the study of God’s Word. I studied the Bible an hour a day for about 25 years and I have studied the Bible for 2–4 hours a day for the past 5 years, and have come to realize that there is so much more for me to learn. The Bible is not a book which can be mastered after 10 years of intense study.


The second thing that we learn from this verse is, we have time off as well. It is important for us to know what God has for us to learn; but God also gives us free time; He lets us have recess. There is a balance in our lives. In fact, we have far more time off than we have time where we are to have fellowship with God through His Word. I mentioned that I study the Bible from 2–4 hours daily. That is not normal and that is not expected of every believer in Jesus Christ. Certain believers with specific gifts might spend that time or even longer studying the Word (R. B. Thieme Jr. used to claim to study 10–12 hours a day and the quality of his teaching reflected this).


Notice how the time in their day was spent: Adam was off working in the garden and the woman was in the garden (on this day, being deceived by the serpent). Adam returns—there is no indication that the woman went to find him—and the woman hands him the fruit. Adam understands that eating this fruit is disobedience to God, and he eats the fruit, and they both enter into a fallen state. Then Yehowah comes walking in the garden. Much of this narrative suggests that there was an order in which things were done each day: Adam worked, the woman hung out with the animals, and then Adam returned from work; and then Jehovah came to them during the spirit of the day, which would be when He would teach them the Word of God. Obviously, whatever the 2nd member of the Trinity said to them during the spiritual part of the day would be truth, which is equivalent to Bible teaching today. We do not know what was taught, although we can surmise that God taught Adam and the woman at least 3 sets of doctrines: (1) how the world was created and restored; (2) how man and the woman were created; and (3) the one prohibition.


God has allowed us, through numerous analogous situations, to understand Him. Much of our lives are parables from which we can learn. What does a parent teach his child? He teaches his child about the world, he often will tell the child about the day he or she was born, and he will lay out a set of prohibitions. Do we as parents do this once? Of course not! We repeat and repeat. We as parents are like God to our children. Our training and teaching a child sticks with that child often for his entire life. As a teacher, I had dealings with thousands of students, and now and again, I would think to myself, “What is wrong with you, kid?” Then, in a parent-teacher conference, I would meet the parents, and often this would answer this question for me.


In any case, for days and possibly years, Jesus Christ came into the garden and spoke to Adam and the woman, and taught them. However, when they sinned, Adam and the woman gave no thought to God. They only thought about one another and about their nakedness. However, as soon as they heard God’s voice, they responded—they hid from Him in a forested part of the garden.


Genesis 3:8c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

châbâʾ (חָבָא) [pronounced khawb-VAW]

to withdraw, to hide; to hide onself

3rd person masculine singular, Hithpael imperfect

Strong’s #2244 BDB #285

ʾâdâm (אָדָם) [pronounced aw-DAWM]

a man, a human being, mankind, Adam

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #120 BDB #9

we (or ve) (וְ or וּ) [pronounced weh]

and, even, then; namely; when; since, that; though

simple wâw conjunction

No Strong’s # BDB #251

ʾîshshâh (אִשָּה) [pronounced eesh-SHAW]

woman, wife

feminine singular noun with the 3rd person masculine singular suffix

Strong's #802 BDB #61

min (מִן) [pronounced mihn]

from, away from, out from, out of from, off, on account of, since, above, than, so that not, beyond, more than

preposition of separation

Strong's #4480 BDB #577

pânîym (פָּנִים) [pronounced paw-NEEM]

face, faces, countenance; presence

masculine plural construct (plural acts like English singular)

Strong’s #6440 BDB #815

Together, min pânîym mean from before the face of; out from before the face, from the presence of. However, together, they can also be a reference to the cause, whether near or remote, and can therefore be rendered because of, because that; by.

YHWH (יהוה) [pronunciation is possibly yhoh-WAH]

transliterated variously as Jehovah, Yahweh, Yehowah

proper noun

Strong’s #3068 BDB #217

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

tâveke (תָּוֶ) [pronounced taw-VEKE]

midst, among, middle

masculine singular construct

Strong's #8432 BDB #1063

With the bêyth preposition, tâveke can mean in the middle of, in the midst of; into, among. In the Hebrew, this is spelled בְּתוֹך׃. With the 2nd person masculine plural suffix, it can mean in your midst, among you. with the 3rd person masculine plural suffix, it can mean in their midst, among them.

ʿêts (עֵץ) [pronounced ģayts]

tree, wood; wooden post, [wooden] stake, gallows; [collectively for] a forest of trees

masculine singular construct

Strong’s #6086 BDB #781

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article; pausal form

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171


Translation: ...the man hides himself and his woman, from the presence of Yehowah Elohim among the trees of the garden. Most of the sentences have involved plural nouns and plural verbs. They both heard Jehovah Elohim in the garden walking; but here, the man hides himself. Now, although this is not an unusual thing to find, it can mean possible that the man thought about himself first, and maybe he dragged the woman along with him, but this was an act that the man took for himself.


Although we do not really know what the garden was like, I have been in places in the wetlands where, in some places, you can stand 10 yards from someone else and not see them because of the thickness or the trees and brush. So the man and the woman found a place to hide probably among a thicket of trees and bushes.


Gen 3:8 In the spirit [or, spiritual part] of the day, the man and his wife heard the Yehowah Elohim [the Lord God] walking around in the garden. So they hid from Yehowah Elohim among the trees in the garden.


The man and the woman have spent some time in the garden after they sinned working on their aprons. Then they heard Jesus Christ, the 2nd person of the Trinity, walking in the garden. Now, they think of God and what they have done. The automatic response of someone who is spiritually dead is, they hide from God. The revealed member of the Trinity comes to talk with them during the spiritual part of the day, and their first thought is to hide.


Adam and the woman had both sinned. Before God, they were fallen creatures. They understood their predicament. They were filthy before a holy God.




——————————


Chapter Outline

Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines


The Fall: God Gathers the Facts


And so calls, Yehowah Elohim, unto the man and he says to him, “Where [are] you?”

Genesis

3:9

Yehowah Elohim then called unto the man, saying to him, “Where [are] you?”

Jehovah God then called out to the man, saying, “Where are you?”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And the Lord God called to Adam, and said to him, Is not all the world which I have made manifest before Me; the darkness as the light? and how have you thought in your heare to hide from before Me? The place where you are concealed, do I not see? Where are the commandments that I commanded you? [JERUSALEM. Walking in the garden in the strength of the day......And the Word of the Lord God called to Adam, and said to him, Behold, the world which I have created is manifest before Me; and how thinkest thou that the place in the midst whereof thou art, is not revealed before Me? Where is the commandment which I taught thee?]

Latin Vulgate                          And the Lord God called Adam, and said to him: Where are you?

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so calls, Yehowah Elohim, unto the man and he says to him, “Where [are] you?”

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And the LORD God called to Adam, and said to him, Where are you, Adam?

Septuagint (Greek)                And the Lord God called Adam and said to him, Adam, where are you?

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Contemporary English V.       The LORD called out to the man and asked, "Where are you?"

Easy English                          But the *Lord God called aloud to the man. God said, `Where are you?'

Good News Bible (TEV)         But the LORD God called out to the man, "Where are you?"

The Message                         GOD called to the Man: "Where are you?"

New Berkeley Version           Then the Lord God called out to the man [This, too, is an eternal principle: God wants His children back.]; He said to him: Where are you?

New Life Bible                        But the Lord God called to the man. He said to him, "Where are you?"


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And Jehovah God called to Adam, saying, 'Where are you Adam?'

God’s Word                         The LORD God called to the man and asked him, "Where are you?"


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And the voice of the Lord God came to the man, saying, Where are you?

NET Bible®                             But the LORD God called to [The Hebrew verb ????? (qara', "to call") followed by the preposition ???? or ?? ('el- or lÿ, "to, unto") often carries the connotation of "summon."] the man and said to him, "Where are you?" Where are you? The question is probably rhetorical (a figure of speech called erotesis) rather than literal, because it was spoken to the man, who answers it with an explanation of why he was hiding rather than a location. The question has more the force of "Why are you hiding?"


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

Concordant Literal Version    And calling is Yahweh Elohim to the human, and He is saying to him, "Adam! Where are you?

English Standard Version      But the LORD God called to the man and said to him, "Where are you?"

English Standard V. – UK       But the Lord God called to the man and said to him, "Where are you [In Hebrew you is singular in verses 9 and 11]?"

Syndein                                  And theJehovah/God Elohim/Godhead kept on calling to the man {adam}, and said unto him, "Why are you . . . where you are?"

World English Bible                Yahweh God called to the man, and said to him, "Where are you?"

Young’s Updated LT             And Jehovah God calls unto the man, and says to him, “Where are you?”

 

The gist of this verse:          God calls out to the man asking where he is.


Genesis 3:9a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

qârâʾ (קָרָא) [pronounced kaw-RAW]

to call, to proclaim, to read, to call to, to call out to, to assemble, to summon; to call, to name [when followed by a lâmed]

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong's #7121 BDB #894

YHWH (יהוה) [pronunciation is possibly yhoh-WAH]

transliterated variously as Jehovah, Yahweh, Yehowah

proper noun

Strong’s #3068 BDB #217

ʾĚlôhîym (אלֹהִים) [pronounced el-o-HEEM]

God; gods, foreign gods, god; rulers, judges; superhuman ones, angels; transliterated Elohim

masculine plural noun

Strong's #430 BDB #43

ʾel (אֶל) [pronounced ehl]

unto; into, among, in; toward, to; against; concerning, regarding; besides, together with; as to

directional preposition (respect or deference may be implied)

Strong's #413 BDB #39

ʾâdâm (אָדָם) [pronounced aw-DAWM]

a man, a human being, mankind, Adam

masculine singular noun with the definite article

Strong's #120 BDB #9


Translation: Yehowah Elohim then called unto the man,... There are several clues which suggest that we are not getting the entirety of the interchange between Yehowah and Adam. Probably, at this point, Jesus Christ is calling out, “Adam, Adam.”


Genesis 3:9b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

lâmed (לְ) [pronounced le]

to, for, towards, in regards to

directional/relational preposition

No Strong’s # BDB #510

ʾêy (י̤א) [pronounced āy]

where

adverb; with a suffix, the verb to be may be implied; with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #335 BDB #32


Translation: ...saying to him, “Where [are] you?” God speaks directly to Adam, as we have the 2nd person masculine singular suffix for this adverb. Adam is in charge, so God calls out to speak to the one in charge.


Several translators rendered this, “Adam, where are you?” This is legitimate, as God probably did call out Adam’s name to begin with.


Gen 3:9 The LORD God called to the man and asked him, "Where [are] you?"


Jesus Christ is omniscient and He knew exactly where Adam and the woman were. It is important to note that God always makes the first move in our relationship with Him (again, setting a precedent—we do not go looking for God; He comes looking for us). Adam and the woman did not have to go looking for God; God came to them. In the Hebrew, Jehovah Elohim utters one word, the adverb where, affixed to which is the 2nd person masculine singular suffix.


Interestingly enough, God calls out to Adam, and not to Adam and the woman. In the Hebrew, God calls to unto the Adam. The 2nd person masculine singular suffix can refer only to the man. There is a strict order of authority. God is the authority over the man and the man is the authority over the woman. Since Adam is in charge, and since it is obvious that Adam and the woman are hiding, God calls out to Adam, the one in authority.


God must speak first and He calls to the man, as the federal head of the earth. God is omniscient and He knows where they both are, but He must open the lines of communication. God must always reach out to us to provide us a grace means or a non-meritorious way to have fellowship or to restore fellowship with Him. God's question is a simple interrogative adverb with a second person, masculine singular suffix.


Let me remind you that when Satan spoke to the woman, he continually said, “You all.” It was not that Satan is a southerner, but when speaking to only the woman, he included Adam in everything that he said. Here, God calls out to Adam and Adam only.


The fact that God called out to Adam does not mean that God had no idea where he was. God knew in eternity past that Adam and the woman would sin and then hide in the forest of the garden. However, this sets up a precedent. Adam and the woman have sinned. They are now under eternal condemnation from God, even though this may seem like a trivial sin to you and me. However, when they hear the voice of God, they both know Who it is and they both believe in Him (if they did not believe in Him, then it would make no sense to hide from Him). What we find here is the gospel being laid out, even though it is not specifically stated. The book of Genesis is very subtle. The seed of every major doctrine is found in the pages of Genesis, but often, it is just a seed (however, about a third of the way through Genesis, it will be clear that we are saved by faith in Jehovah Elohim in Gen. 15:6).


The Spirit is involved and God speaks to man; man does not go looking for God. Adam hears Jehovah Elohim and the woman hears Jehovah Elohim, and they do respond, believing that He is there. They know Who He is, and they believe in Him. This does not mean that, when we are called, we hear an audible voice—in fact, that would be highly unlikely if not psychotic.


——————————


Adam answers God.


And so he says, “Your sound I heard in the garden and so I am afraid for naked I [was]; and so I hide myself.

Genesis

3:10

And Adam [lit., he] replied [lit., said], “I heard Your sound [or, voice] in the garden, and I was afraid because I [was] naked; therefore, I hid myself.”

And Adam replied, “I heard You in the garden and I was afraid because of being naked; therefore, I hid myself.”


Here is how others have translated this verse:


Ancient texts:

 

Targum of Onkelos                And he said, The voice of Thy Word heard I in the garden, and I was afraid, because I am naked; and the commandment which Thou didst teach me, I have transgressed; therefore I hid myself from shame.

Latin Vulgate                          And he said: I heard thy voice in paradise; and I was afraid, because I was naked, and I hid myself.

Masoretic Text (Hebrew)        And so he says, “Your sound I heard in the garden and so I am afraid for naked I [was]; and so I hide myself.

Peshitta (Syriac)                    And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and when I saw that I was naked, I hid myself.

Septuagint (Greek)                And he said to Him, I heard Your voice as You walked in the garden, and I feared because I was naked and I hid myself.

 

Significant differences: 


Thought-for-thought translations; paraphrases:

 

Contemporary English V.       The man answered, "I was naked, and when I heard you walking through the garden, I was frightened and hid!"

Easy-to-Read Version            The man said, “I heard you walking in the garden, and I was afraid. I was naked, so I hid.”


Partially literal and partially paraphrased translations:

 

American English Bible          And [Adam] replied to God: 'I heard Your voice as You were walking through Paradise, but I was afraid because of my nakedness, so I hid myself.'

Ancient Roots Translinear      He said, "I heard your voice in the garden, and I feared, for I am bare! I concealed myself."

God’s Word                         He answered, "I heard you in the garden. I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid."

NIRV                                      "I heard you in the garden," the man answered. "I was afraid. I was naked, so I hid.".

New Jerusalem Bible             'I heard the sound of you in the garden,' he replied. 'I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid.'


Mostly literal renderings (with some occasional paraphrasing):

 

Bible in Basic English             And he said, Hearing your voice in the garden I was full of fear, because I was without clothing: and I kept myself from your eyes.

Ferar-Fenton Bible                 And he repliced, “I heard Your sound in the Garden, and perceiving that I was naked, I hid myself.”

NET Bible®                             The man replied [Heb "and he said."], "I heard you moving about [Heb "your sound." If one sees a storm theophany here (see the note on the word "time" in v. 8), then one could translate, "your powerful voice."] in the orchard, and I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid."


Limited Vocabulary Translations:


 

International Standard V        .


Catholic Bibles (those having the Imprimatur):

 

The Heritage Bible                 .


Jewish/Hebrew Names Bibles:

 

Kaplan Translation                 .


Expanded/Embellished Bibles:

 

Kretzmann’s Commentary    .

Lexham English Bible            .

Translation for Translators     .

The Voice                               .


Literal, almost word-for-word, renderings:

 

The Amplified Bible                He said, I heard the sound of You [walking] in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; and I hid myself.

Updated Brenton                    And he said to him, I heard your voice as you walked in the garden, and I feared because I was naked and I hid myself.

Concordant Literal Version    And saying is he to Him, "The sound of You walking hear I in the garden, and fearful am I, for naked am I, and I am hiding.

Darby Translation                  And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and I feared, because I am naked; and I hid myself.

exeGeses companion Bible   And he says,

I hear your voice in the garden;

and I awe because I am naked;

and I hide myself.

Heritage Bible                        And he said, I attentively heard your voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.

Syndein                                  {Preliminary Hearing}

And he {Adam} said, "I heard your voice in the garden {calling him to bible class}, and I kept on being afraid {spiritually dead so no desire for doctrine}; because I was naked {`eyrom} . . . and I hid myself." {Note: In Hebrew only one dot in syntax is the difference between 'crafty'( 'aruwm) of the serpent and naked (`eyrom) here. The words are syntactically related.}.

World English Bible                The man said, "I heard your voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself."

Young’s Updated LT             And he says, “Your sound I have heard in the garden, and I am afraid, for I am naked, and I hide myself.”

 

The gist of this verse:          The man, now covered by fig leaves, replies to God, “I heard you in the garden, but I was afraid. Because I am naked, I hid myself.”


Genesis 3:10a

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

ʾâmar (אָמַר) [pronounced aw-MAHR]

to say, to speak, to utter; to say [to oneself], to think

3rd person masculine singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #559 BDB #55

ʾêth (אֶח) [pronounced ayth]

generally untranslated; occasionally to, toward

indicates that the following substantive is a direct object

Strong's #853 BDB #84

qôwl (קוֹל) [pronounced kohl]

sound, voice, noise; loud noise, thundering

masculine singular noun with the 2nd person masculine singular suffix

Strong’s #6963 BDB #876

shâmaʿ (שָמַע) [pronounced shaw-MAHĢ]

to listen [intently], to hear, to listen and obey, [or, and act upon, give heed to, take note of], to hearken to, to be attentive to, to listen and be cognizant of

1st person singular, Qal perfect

Strong's #8085 BDB #1033

be (בְּ) [pronounced beh]

in, into, through; at, by, near, on, upon; with, before, against; by means of; among; within

a preposition of proximity

No Strong’s # BDB #88

gan (גַּן) [pronounced gahn]

a garden, enclosure, an enclosed garden

masculine singular noun with the definite article; pausal form

Strong’s #1588 BDB #171


Translation: And Adam [lit., he] replied [lit., said], “I heard Your sound [or, voice] in the garden,... God called out to Adam and asked where he was. Here, Adam explains why he was hiding, which is not what God asked him. However, probably what is missing from this conversation is, “I am here.” “Why are you hiding from Me?’


Adam tries to explain away why he was hiding from God; and he is probably still speaking from behind a tree. First, he heard God in the garden. Whether it is God’s voice or sound, the text is not clear.


What is deep in Adam’s mind is the sound of God walking through the garden, a sound he had heard many times before and always welcomed. However, this time, Adam was afraid. He places Your sound at the beginning of this sentence, because that is what struck him as the most remarkable aspect of what was happening.


Genesis 3:10b

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

yârêʾ (יָרְא) [pronounced yaw-RAY]

to fear, to be afraid; to fear-respect, to reverence, to have a reverential respect

1st person singular, Qal imperfect

Strong’s #3372 BDB #431

This is the first occurrence of this very common verb.


Translation: ...and I was afraid... Now, this is interesting, that Adam knows the word for afraid. God may have been teaching him all of this time, and this word came up in a lesson. Adam may have first heard this word in connection to reverence, rather than to fear; and this word came to mean both, as Adam is certainly afraid.


Note what occurs; Adam is fearful, an emotion that he has never had before; and he immediately justifies himself (which he will continue to do throughout this chapter). He possessed no shame or regret prior to his fall. Being naked before God and before his right woman was not an issue. He has always been naked and at this point in time, he is covered with a loin cloth, so he is not even naked now. And note, more importantly, he does not tell God that he is hiding because he ate of the fruit. God knows all of what has happened. His speaking to the man is to restore fellowship and to pass judgement on the man and the woman. However, the facts must be clearly stated for the man, and the woman and for all angelic creation. This is the purpose of the subsequent interrogation.


Genesis 3:10c

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

kîy (כִּי) [pronounced kee]

when, that, for, because

explanatory conjunction; preposition

Strong's #3588 BDB #471

ʿêrôm (עֵרֹם) [pronounced ģay-ROAM]

naked; exposed

masculine singular adjective

Strong’s #5903 BDB #735

This is also spelled with a yodh: ʿêyrôm (עֵירֹם) [pronounced gay-ROAM] (the yodh is found here).

ʾânôkîy (אָנֹכִי) [pronounced awn-oh-KEE]

I, me; (sometimes a verb is implied)

1st person singular personal pronoun

Strong’s #595 BDB #59

As with all pronouns, sometimes the verb to be is implied.


Translation: ...because I [was] naked;... Have you ever seen your child lie to you for the first time, and they do a lousy job? This is Adam’s problem here. He had never lied before; he did not even give lying any thought. However, he is quickly trying to explain to God why he is hiding. So he offers up what he seems to be a reasonable excuse, “I am hiding because I am naked.” However, remember, he is no longer naked. He is wearing fig leaves.


Genesis 3:10d

Hebrew/Pronunciation

Common English Meanings

Notes/Morphology

BDB and Strong’s Numbers

wa (or va) (וַ) [pronounced wah]

and so, and then, then, and; so, that, yet, therefore, consequently; because

wâw consecutive

No Strong’s # BDB #253

châbâʾ (חָבָא) [pronounced khawb-VAW]

to hide onself; to lie hiding; [fleeing away] secretly

1st person singular, Niphal imperfect

Strong’s #2244 BDB #285


Translation: ...therefore, I hid myself.” And here is the complete explanation for why Adam his himself; he was afraid. The other stuff is just what Adam said.


Gen 3:10 He answered, "I heard You in the garden. I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid."


Adam now has the knowledge of evil and human good. Furthermore, he has developed a superficial code of human morality. Now note, Adam does not reveal the true reason why he is hiding. He doesn’t say, “I have sinned and ate from the fruit of the tree.” He says he is hiding because he is naked. Adam is no longer naked; he is wearing fig leaves. So the idea that he is concerned that God will see him naked is ridiculous. However, this is Adam’s first attempt at lying, so he is not very good at it. He recognizes that this act of morality did not fix the problem between himself and God. The real problem is, Adam ate from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, disobeying God. So, his automatic response, without thinking, is to lie, albeit, a poorly conceived lie. “I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid.” He isn’t naked. He is wearing an apron of fig leaves. He is obviously flustered, however.


Recap: Adam and the woman have sinned. God told them not to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, and yet they did. Satan first deceived the woman, and she ate; but when she handed the fruit to Adam, he ate with full cognizance, understanding that he was disobeying God’s explicit command. He was not confused or deceived; he knew that he was making a choice between the fallen woman and Jehovah Elohim. Although it is difficult to determine a person’s motivation when it is not explicitly stated, the woman stood before Adam with the forbidden fruit in her hand. No conversation between Adam and the woman is recorded. No other motivation seems reasonable, other than Adam knew that he was choosing the fallen woman over Jehovah Elohim.


After they sinned, Jehovah Elohim came to speak to them in what appears to be a daily session of teaching.


Gen 3:8 In the spirit [or, spiritual part] of the day, the man and his wife heard the Yehowah Elohim [the Lord God] walking around in the garden. So they hid from Yehowah Elohim among the trees in the garden.


In order for the man and the woman to hide from Jehovah Elohim, they had to first believe that He is.


Gen 3:9 The LORD God called to the man and asked him, "Where [are] you?"


Is it possible that God came into the Garden of Eden and taught Adam only? As we have studied, God calls out to Adam alone, calling out with just one word: “Where [you]?”


Gen 3:10 He answered, "I heard You in the garden. I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid."


As we have already studied, Adam’s first communication with God was his first attempt at a lie, and Adam was not very good at it. He explains that he is hiding because he is naked; but he is not naked—he is wearing a fig-leaf apron. Adam now clearly has a sin nature because he lies to God. Lying is his first and automatic response to God.


Almost everyone has their own idea of the worst sins that they can commit. However, apart from the fall itself, note that Satan lied to the woman and note that Adam is lying to God. By way of contrast, the Word of God is truth (Psalm 119:34 John 17:17 2Tim. 2:15) and God is truth (Psalm 31:5 Isa. 65:16).


One of the worst sins found in the Bible is that of lying. Lying is fundamentally opposed to all that God is. It is exactly opposed to His very character in every way.

The Doctrine of Truth and Lies

1.      First we need to understand that God is the truth, and because of that, all falsehood is abhorrent to Him. David, in Psalm 31:5, writes, in anticipation of the cross: Into Your hand I commit my spirit; You have redeemed me, O Jehovah, the God of truth. See also Ex. 34:6 Isa. 65:16

2.      God never lies. Titus 1:2

3.      Furthermore, God’s Word is truth; the Bible is truth. Jesus Christ, speaking to God the Father in prayer, said, “Your Word is truth.” (John 17:17b). See also Psalm 119:34 2Tim. 2:15

4.      Truth and lies are mutually exclusive. That is, if the truth is corrupted by falsehood, then it is no longer the truth. You know that no lie is of the truth (1John 2:21b).

5.      Jesus bore witness to the truth. When Pilate asked Jesus if He is the King of the Jews, Jesus answered him, “You say that I am a king. To this end I was born, and for this cause I came into the world, that I should bear witness to the truth.” (John 18:37). John 8:45

         1)      As an aside, one of the most illogical positions a person can take is that, Jesus was a great teacher and a great religious leader, but He was not God. As many have pointed out, there are only 3 logical positions which a man can take with regards to the Person of Jesus Christ: (1) Either He is a liar of the greatest magnitude, leading thousands of people astray in His time, claiming Deity which He did not possess; (2) He was a crazed man, who insanely believe that He was God (and before you take this option, remember all that He said and did—were these the actions and words of a crazy person?); or, (3) Jesus is the Son of God, just as He claimed throughout His ministry. Not a son of God but the Son of God.

         2)      It makes little sense for a man to do and say what Jesus did and said, and for this to be nothing more than a charade.

6.      God desires for all to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth. 1Tim. 2:4

7.      Jesus Christ told His disciples, “I am the way, the truth and the life; no man comes to the Father but by Me.” (John 14:6).

8.      We do not know how Satan tempted a third of the angels to rebel against God, but it is reasonable to assume that this was done by lying to some or all of them. Rev. 12:4

9.      Satan employed dishonesty when tempting the woman. When Satan, in the form of a serpent, spoke to the woman, he lied to her. “You certainly will not die!” And he promised the woman, “[If you eat from the tree,] you [and Adam] will be like God, knowing good and evil.” Implied here is a better and greater existence, which will come to pass by disobeying God. Gen. 3:1–4

10.    Jesus calls Satan the father of lies (He said this when calling the religious men of His day, children of the Devil). John 8:44

11.    One of the Ten Commandments is, You will not speak a false statement against an associate (Ex. 20:16).

12.    There are 7 sins which are abhorrent to the soul of God, and two of these involve lying: one who has a lying tongue and one who is a false witness. Some teach that these are the worst sins that man can commit. Prov. 6:17, 19

13.    Lying is condemned throughout the New Testament as well. Eph. 4:25 Col. 3:9 1Tim. 1:10 Rev. 21:8

14.    Men, by their very nature, will attempt to suppress and subvert the truth. For the wrath of God is revealed from Heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, because the thing which may be known of God is clearly revealed within them, for God revealed it to them. For the unseen things of Him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being realized by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, for them to be without excuse. Because, knowing God, they did not glorify Him as God, neither were thankful. But they became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish hearts were darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools and changed the glory of the incorruptible God into an image made like corruptible man, and birds, and four-footed animals, and creeping things. Therefore God