Links to the Psalms


The key to the charts below is, if it is red, then I have completed the exegesis of that psalm and it is available online, and you should be able to click on the link to get to the psalm. Those in magenta, I have decided where I will place them, but I have not begun the exegesis yet. Those in blue, but not underlined, have not been placed or exegeted. The first chart are for HTML psalms, which will open easily in your web browser; however, the Hebrew characters will be messtup or missing. The PDF psalms will be formatted exactly as they should be, with the Hebrew in tact; however, the larger files may not open on your computer. In that case, you will have to right click, select “save link as...” and place it on your own hard drive and open it using acrobat reader.


I have some notes to myself, called the Order of the Psalms (PDF version). In this, I have spent time giving a brief summary of each psalm and I have attempted to place the psalm into a logical place in Scripture (as I did not want to come to the psalms and exegete them all at the same time). My reasons for placing a psalm here or there is not always a matter of authorship, but sometimes of subject matter. There are an assortment of short doctrines in this document as well, including various classifications of the psalms.


By the way, there is some significance to the colors used below. Red indicates that this psalm has been exegeted and is available at my website. Red is a link to that psalm. Magenta indicates that I have placed the psalm, but I have not exegeted it yet. Blue indicates that I have not yet placed the psalm or exegeted it.


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Although I have exegeted more psalms than are found below, these are the most recent additions (since 2007).


Just added: Psalm 32 (October 30, 2011) Psalm 41 (October 31, 2012) Psalm 55 (November 9, 2012) Psalm 61 (December 1, 2012) Psalm 62 (February 9, 2013).



Psalm 12 added 5-1-2007 (HTML) (PDF) Here's what I suggest; read this psalm; particularly v. 6. So, what is an earthen furnace? The key to this verse is ellipsis and the key to the psalm is organization. Once you understand that, everything will hold together and make sense. By the way, this is one of the most up-to-date portions of Scripture; this deals with the internet and the political left and their present-day tactics.



Psalm 20 completed 9/11/09 (HTML) (PDF) Most of the time, I end up feeling as if I had a good understanding of a psalm and its time and place. However, I never felt that with Psalm 20. I felt that in my exegesis, I was missing something, some key which would have unlocked this psalm for me. This does not necessarily mean that exegeting and interpreting the psalm was problematic. However, at the very end of this psalm, I put together a possible way that this psalm may have been sung (i.e., who sung what), and that may explain David's organization for this psalm (his literary organization could be quite complex). Part of the problem is determining, to whom is David speaking from verse to verse.


In this psalm, we will examine God's protection for believers in time; God's protection of the United States; propitiation; the accuracy of the text of the Bible; the Dead Sea Scrolls; the state of America in 2009; how and why God is protecting the United States in the year 2009; our spiritual obligations; and our temporal lives in the light of eternity.


Some of the doctrines covered include God answers prayer from His holy place; God's right hand in the life of David; and God hears us and answers our prayers.


http://kukis.org/Psalms/Psalm020.htm


http://kukis.org/Psalms/Psalm020.pdf



Psalm 21 completed 9/14/09 (HTML) (PDF) God the Holy Spirit guides the writer of Scripture in such a way that, without waving that writer's intelligence, vocabulary, train of thought and personality, records God's Word to man. In prophecy, we often find portions of prophecy which have a near and a far fulfillment. Psalm 21 tells us what is going on with David and, simultaneously, with David's Greater Son. So, in a way, we have two psalms here by two authors. Understanding this is the key to this psalm, and at the end of the psalm, I will give the two interpretations side-by-side the text.


This study also explains why David, although the most spiritually mature of the kings, does not have an emphasis upon the Tabernacle or the sacrificial worship in his own writings. There is also a builder analogy which helps to explain the functions of the Trinity. This is another psalm where we find the name Jesus in the psalm itself. We will also examine David, his stability and his rise to power; what is a righteous war; economic and social justice; and David, in this psalm, recognizes the blessings which God has laid on him.


The doctrines covered include "The Ministry of the Holy Spirit to Jesus Christ," "The Prayers of Jesus," "How Majesty and Splendor are placed upon David, upon Jesus Christ, and upon the Church Age believer," "God's Essence as Portrayed in the Psalms," "God's relationship to man as found in the psalms," "The Baptism of Fire," "The Places of Judgment after Death," "The Doctrine of Evil," "Satan's Present-Day Attacks against the 4 Divine Institutions."


There may be too much material on differentiating between the terms glory, honor, majesty, and splendor.



Psalm 24 (HTML) (PDF) This short psalm was probably written by David specifically for the carrying in the Ark into Jerusalem. Although the Bible is not a scientific book, it makes a few statements which were pretty amazing to have been written by a shepherd-king 3000 years ago.



Psalm 32 added October 30, 2011 (HTML) (PDF) Most people connect this psalm to David’s sin with Bathsheba and her husband Uriah. That may or may not be the case, but Psalm 32 does lay out a complete description of the Old Testament spiritual life. There are a number of general topics in this psalm; among them are: man in the Old Testament did not fully understand the forgiveness of sin as we do; salvation in the Old and New Testaments; David’s discipline and the disciplining of your own children; the uses of Selah in this psalm; and the concept of God’s protection for the believer; The more formally developed doctrines include the Doctrine of Imputations, the Doctrine of Adam’s Original Sin (both taken from Robby Dean); the Stages of Discipline; Confession of Sins in the Old Testament; The Abbreviated Doctrine of the Ministry of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament; The Abbreviated Doctrine of Logistical Grace; How to be in the will of God and how to remain in the will of God; Guidance from the Word of God; and Psalm 32 Encapsulates the Spiritual Life.


Psalm 41 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) added October 31, 2012. This is a psalm written by David when on his sickbed, and there was a reaction of some that they hoped he would die. It appears that this was written after Absalom had returned to Jerusalem and had been formally recognized in David’s court (2Sam. 14:33). Soon thereafter, David took ill, which possibly planted the seed in Absalom to revolt against David. The inclusion of Absalom and Ahithophel in this psalm is an assumption made by most commentators. The illness which David suffered from is not found in the narrative of Samuel or Chronicles (only the final illness at the end of David’s life is recorded in these books). This psalm is of particular note because Jesus quotes it and applies it to His betrayal by Judas. However, clearly in the context of this psalm, David appears to be talking about being betrayed by Ahithophel. This introduces the concept of the Dual Authorship of Scripture, which is written both by man and God the Holy Spirit. This explains Psalm 41, and helps to explain why there are two different interpretations of this psalm; one from David’s viewpoint and one about our Lord. There is information in this psalm about the poor and our relationship with the poor; about your spiritual gift; David’s addiction to sex; and this answers the question, do we pray for our enemies or against them? This psalm is closely related to 2Samuel 15 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).


Psalm 46 (HTML) (PDF) I originally began this study, hoping to tie this psalm to the moving of the Ark by David into Jerusalem (there is one word found in the inscription which is only found in one other chapter of Scripture: 1Chronicles 15). After working on the psalm for about a week, it became apparent that such an interpretation was unwarranted. It is more likely that this psalm should be placed when Sennacharib first attempted to invade Judah by intimidating the Jewish people. I completed this exegesis, even though it was unrelated to where I am in the books of Samuel and Chronicles. I did not want to leave this psalm half-done. This, along with other events, helped to solidify my thoughts expressed above in War and the Believer. (4/12/07)



Psalm 47 added 5-19-2007 (HTML) (PDF) God is presented as Sovereign over all the world, something which is clear in Old Testament Scripture. This psalm was possibly sung when the Ark was transported into Jerusalem, and speaks of our Lord's 2nd Advent. There are some fascinating parallels between this psalm and the history of Israel and between this psalm and the resurrection of Jesus Christ.


Psalm 51 completed 10/8/2011 (HTML) (PDF) To the best of my knowledge this psalm has never been properly or fully exegeted until now. This is the psalm written by David after his affair with Bathsheba and after he had her husband killed. Nathan had come to David causing David to come to himself, to recognize the evil that he had done; and David both confesses his sin to God in this psalm and he demands complete and total forgiveness by God. One of the things which comes out in this psalm is the concept of the dual authorship of Scripture; there is a human author and a Divine Author (God the Holy Spirit), and it becomes clear in this psalm that, the human author writes one thing, and the Divine Author writes another. From this will come a series of doctrines related to this dual authorship: The Co-Authorship of God the Holy Spirit and David. What Did David (and Other Saints) Know About God’s Forgiveness? What Satan Did not Understand. The Dual Authorship of the Holy Scriptures. These are tremendously important doctrines which will represent a milestone in the interpretation of Scripture. Human author David will say one thing and God the Holy Spirit will say something else, using the exact same words. This is an amazing concept which helps to explain a great many things about the writings of the Old Testament--particularly, the Psalms, where this is more apparent than anywhere else. There are many additional doctrines in this psalm, including Confession of Sin in the Old Testament, the Sin Nature is Passed Down Through the Male, The Barrier between Man and God, Abortion--Logic and the Bible, The Importance of Bible Doctrine; The Sin unto Death; The Holy Spirit in the Old Testament; The Doctrine of the Way of God; Doctrinal Teaching Available to David; The Man-ward and God-ward Interpretation of Psalm 51:16; among others. There are many topics discussed in this psalm, which are not formally organized into a doctrine: progressive revelation; blotting out sins in the New Testament; how much David understood about the cross and how much he understood about God forgiving sin; degeneracy sins; homosexuality; alcoholics anonymous, victimless crimes, legalizing sins and then taxing them; Karla Faye Tucker (who was executed many years ago in Texas for a heinous murder); the long term consequences of David's sins; development of the soul and wild children; early sexual stimulation of a young person's soul; what it meant for God to take the Holy Spirit from David, David's limited understanding of the Trinity; what it means for David to teach sinners; a flurry of dog sins; David's understanding of what he has written; God's righteousness is what separates Christianity from all other religions; explaining from David's point of view, what he meant when he said God was not interested in burnt offerings; what this means from the view of God the Holy Spirit; David's broken spirit and breaking his sexual addiction; why God deals with the personal failings of rulers; and why God deals with us both individually and corporately.


Psalm 55 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) completed 11/20/2012 Psalm 55 may seem as up to date as the 2012 election. This psalm appears to concern itself with the Absalom revolution against David (Absalom is David’s son); and the tactics which are used by Absalom, found both here and in 2Sam. 15, are still used today, with few modifications. Therefore, I used the 2012 election to illustrate this psalm in several places; however, this psalm may be overlaid upon nearly any election, local or national, to show how politics works, or, in the words of Solomon, to reveal that there is no new thing under the sun (Eccles. 1:9). Included in this study are links to the Doctrine of Prayer; the Davidic Covenant; Do We Pray for our Enemies or Against them; the Doctrine of Sheol; Disaster Testing and the Faith-rest Technique (Stan Simonton); and Fear vs. Faith (Stan Simonton). You should be warned that there are 3 verses in this psalm which are very difficult to translate. Several doctrines are linked: the Doctrine of Revolution; the Laws of Divine Establishment; and the Doctrine of Evil. David uses doctrinal rationales in order to get out of the deep personal funk that he was in due to Absalom’s revolt.


Psalm 61 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) completed 12/1/2012. In nearly every chapter of the Bible and in nearly every psalm, I get the organization and/or gist of that chapter, and this understanding helps to explain and nuance each verse of that chapter. However, with Psalm 61, I did not quite get the unifying theme, the big idea, the reason the psalmist was driven to write these words down, the unique principle found here and nowhere else or the organization. Usually, I get one of those things, and then one or two of the others become clear. I did not get this with Psalm 61. I can reasonably place it in time, but cannot find its key or its unique aspect. Nevertheless, this required an examination of the Doctrine of Vows, the Doctrine of Wings, the Doctrine of Inheritance, the Eternal Nature of All the God is, and Grace and Truth in the Plan of God. However, the one thing that did stand out is, this contrasted David’s “I will’s” with the arrogant “I will’s” of Satan. Perhaps that is what is key to this psalm; and what makes this psalm unique. Also, the use of the word Tabernacle in this psalm might help us to place this and 3 other psalms into an historical context.


Psalm 62 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) completed 2/9/2013. This psalm is all about David’s great confidence in God, in under great trying circumstances. Included in this study is how the name of Jesus is found in the Old Testament (not just once, but many times).


This is an amazing psalm with many applications. We look at our youth today and in whom they trust. We evaluate recent presidential elections. We look at personal greed and desires; and we examine the CEO’s and those who are rich. We examine the prohibition of covetousness. We look at the difficulties which Paul endured, as well as the difficulties that David himself endured (David wrote this psalm); the fact that faith must be exercised; and the importance of having control over your soul. We also study the relationship of the believer to money, to working, to wealth, to financial security and relate this all to our dependence upon God.


This is one of the many psalms which has the name Jesus in it (3 times).


Some of the doctrines found in this psalm or referred to in this psalm: Jesus is the Rock; Jesus’ Name in the Old Testament; the Dual Authorship of Scripture; The Doctrines of Revolution, Lying, Flattery, Vanity, Grace, Human Good versus Divine Good; God rewards us according to what we have done in the flesh.


This is a marvelous psalm with many modern applications.


Psalm 64 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) completed 12/15/2012. Psalm 64 is all about the two kinds of people who support a revolution and the sins of the tongue utilized by revolutionists (and politicians). Included are many applications to the most recent elections and how verbal sins were employed. Also, Psalm 64 is an amazing chiasmos with 2 different interpretations and an additional application to the Tribulation. There are links and discussions of the doctrines of Fear; Revolution; Sins of the Tongue, and the Upright of Heart. There is also some discussion on why U.S. involvement in the Middle East, with our current strategy of establishing democracies is doomed to failure. Included are specific political applications and how sins of the tongue were used against George W. Bush in order for Barack Obama to win the presidency. Like much of the Bible, this psalm is as up-to-date as the next election. As J. Vernon McGee, sometime in the 1950's or 60's, commenting on Psalm 64: As I look at the world today, I have come to the conclusion that our hope is no longer in statesmen or politicians; our hope is no longer in science or education—they are all more or less failures. We are going to have to do what David did and what Israel will do in the future—start looking up. God is our only hope today. Footnote


Psalm 68 (HTML) (PDF), which is practically the most difficult chapter of the Bible that I have ever exegeted (which includes the chapters of Job that I have done so far). There were two verses for which I could form almost no explanation; and there were a half dozen verses which I half-explained, but not to my own standards. However, despite this, I feel as though this has been some of my most productive work to date. Here are some of the topics which I covered:

 

         Although I heard a lot of weird theories about the occasion for this psalm, I was able to nail that down with little trouble (comparatively speaking).

         Just who is Mary (the mother of Jesus) and why isn't she just a little bit better than all of us? The Catholic view of Mary taken out to its logical conclusion.

         Freedom, war, our involvement in Vietnam, Iraq; science and women's choices.

         The Lake of Fire; can this really be justified to our human minds?

         The inconvenient locations of Wal-mart in the ancient world.

         Quite frankly, there are some verses in the Bible that we will never understand...what does that mean? Did God screw up? How should we deal with the idea that some portions of Scripture are truly inscrutable.

         Why are there 4 gospels?

         Why do we need to be strong? Why does God want us to grow up spiritually? Isn't the man who can just sit on a park bench and wait for God to take care of him--isn't he the picture of a great, mature faith? What is spiritual growth all about?

         Why did God choose Solomon to build the Temple; why didn't God choose David, as it was in David's mind to build a Temple to God?

         Why do we praise God?

         What is the significance of the ancient heavens?

         Can any scientist fully comprehend anything, no matter how narrow his field?

         God's relationship with the Jew. Arabic hatred for Jews.

         What happened with the Conservative party in the US when we abandoned anti-Semitism.

         So, as you see, despite the fact that I fought tooth and nail with this psalm, I got so much out of it and felt that portions of this psalm reflect my best work (although, taken as a whole, this psalm may tend to be very ponderous).



Psalm 89 (added December 11, 2008) (HTML) (PDF) (the PDF document is not uploaded yet, as I am having document conversion problems—there are nearly 300 pages of exegesis). This examination of Psalm 89 presents the fundamental key to this psalm, which, insofar as I know, has never been presented before. What ought to occur to any exegete is, why is the Davidic Covenant presented in 2Sam. 7, 1Chron. 17, and in Psalm 89? There is more to it than just the idea that, this is an important covenant. What is amazing is, the psalmist pleads with God to fulfill this covenant to David, and, with the same words, presents Jesus Christ, the fulfillment of this covenant to David. There are many places in the Bible where a set of words has 2 or more fulfillments or 2 or more meanings, but this psalmist pleads with God and expresses concern about the fulfillment of this covenant, and, with the very same words, gives the fulfillment of the covenant. This is one of the most amazing passages that I have ever studied. I have spent over half of the past 4 months exegeting this psalm and am still impressed as to the parallel thoughts of Ethan the author and God the Holy Spirit.



Although I exegeted Psalm 95 about a decade ago, exegeting its companion psalm recently caused me to go back and rework this psalm. (HTML) (PDF) There are a number of important doctrines and studies in this psalm. First of all, it is important to note that the key to this psalm is either positive or negative volition after salvation, and we see both sides of this coin here. Some areas of interest might be (1) speculation versus dogmatism; (2) If God owns the earth, what right do we have to claim this or that plot of ground? (3) the proper posture in worship; (4) covenant theology both challenges the faithfulness and veracity of God as well promotes legalism; (5) how could both of the exodus generations fail, but one goes into the land? And (6) how God's promises to Israel parallel the promises made to us for time and eternity.



Psalm 96 added 2/26/08 (HTML) (PDF) This psalm both names Jesus by name and speaks of the earth's circular orbit (yes, I know the earth actually has an elliptical orbit). This is an amazing psalm. Also, with this psalm, because of the new version of WP (X4) and Windows Vista, most of the Hebrew characters are now accurately represented in the HTML documents (which should interest all of about 2 people). This is not retroactive, however, and all older documents will continue to accurately represent the Hebrew and graphics in the PDF documents, but not so much in the HTML docs. I did some minor updates on this psalm 2/25/08, to better explain how we find the name Jesus in Psalm 96. I also found out that Jesus being the Greek equivalent to Joshua is actually up for discussion. I went back and covered this particular issue letter by letter, so that there is no mistaking that our Lord's name in this Psalm.



Psalm 105 added 2007 (HTML) (PDF) The updating process took me 2.5 months and the exegesis is 240 pages long. The updated version has a lot more information than did the previous version. One of the striking features of this psalm is just how complex the organization is. The psalm seems simple to read, but the outline is quite fascinating. A point of interest to some is the spiritual life of Israel; this psalm lists 7 commands of the spiritual life in the Age of Israel. The Catholic Church often gets a bum rap for somehow getting a hold of the early Scriptures and making untold numbers of changes to them early on; this is completely false and covered in this study. Other important topics in this study: your memory is a part of your spiritual life; the exclusivity of the God of the Jews; the Problems of Covenant Theology; Jacob versus Israel; every word of every contract made by God with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob; the exact travels of Abraham and the other patriarchs; the amazing parallels between Joseph and Jesus (as type and antitype); the problem of pain; hints to parents; people tend to mistakenly believe that the Bible is filled with miracles and that, every time you walk into a church, you ought to expect a miracle; thus just is not true--see the time periods of miracles; God turning the Egyptians against His Own people; What About Reparations?; I have developed an hypothesis about God hardening Pharaoh's heart (I am not quite ready to commit to it yet); the meaning of the two "no-water" incidents in the desert wilderness; and, finally, just how accurate are the Old Testament manuscripts? Quite frankly, I am pretty happy with the end results of the commentary of this psalm and highly recommend it.



Psalm 146 (12/17/07) (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) This is one of the many psalms which is carefully organized. In this psalm, there is a different inscription in the Greek text. What does this mean to us? Does this bring all Scripture into question? How much has man messed with the Bible; can we trust it? I also cover the following topics: the Essence of the Soul, False Concepts of the Soul, what it means for Man to be Created in the Image of God, and Salvation in the Old Testament. I also discuss: what man has actually done to the Bible; why we know that we can trust the manuscripts that we have; politics and doctrine; why conservative candidates do not insure divine establishment government, the link to Romney's Religion speech (no, I am not a Mormon; it was still an excellent speech); contrary to what many people believe, the Bible does not beat us over the head with Biblical principals; illustrations of the greatness of R. B. Thieme Jr.'s teaching; the thoughts of men die with them; the plans of man and the constitution of the United States; the importance of the body; abortion (with links to Robby Dean's teaching on this topic); the rarity of water in this universe; the first recorded instance of Global Warming is found in the Bible; welfare and God's plan; why most Christians are failures; and criminals, jailhouse ministries and God's Word. Also, this is where I decided I needed to post the Doctrine of Intercalation.